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Dennis Kennedy

Technology Law and Legal Technology. Dennis Kennedy is one of the few technology lawyers who is also an expert on the underlying technologies. Dennis an award-winning leader in the application of technology and the Internet to the practice of law. DennisKennedy.com gives you access to a wide variety of Dennis Kennedy's resources on legal technology, his writings, his well-known blog, DennisKennedy.Blog, and information about how you can have Dennis speak to your organization or group.

Dennis Kennedy is one of the most knowledgeable legal technologists you will find. - Michael Arkfeld.

Dennis Kennedy, a lawyer and legal technology expert in St. Louis, Mo., has been a significant influence in the ever-evolving relationship between lawyers and the Web. - Robert Ambrogi

Archive for February, 2006

Have You Found Any Good New Legal Technology Blogs Lately?

Tuesday, February 7th, 2006

New is a relative term, but I will highlight five legal tech blogs that have either started or become much more active recently.
1. The I Heart Tech blog is Adriana Linares’ blog. Adriana focuses her work on tech training and her blog is a great source of helpful tips and techniques on technology issues for legal professionals.
2. The Information Governance Engagement Area is Rob Robinson’s blog. Rob focuses on electronic discovery, compliance, records management and information governance issues. He also did a great job of covering the recent LegalTech conference.
3. David Munn’s Legaltech.com Blog covers a variety of legal tech issues from the viewpoint of corporate legal departments.
4. Rick Borstein of Adobe writes the Acrobat for Legal Professionals blog, which posts detailed information about specific Acrobat techniques and issues found by lawyers. It’s a great complementary blog to the PDF for Lawyers blog.
5. The TechnoLawyer Blog is not quite as new, but is another good one for your list. I especially enjoyed Neil Squillante’s recent post on his notes from LegalTech.
For a list of some of the long-lived legal tech blogs, see my Strongest Links column on legal tech blogs from the April 2004 issue of Law Practice Today. It’s also worth noting that a brand new (and excellent) issue Law Practice Today has just been published. Check it out.
Speaking of long-time legal tech bloggers, Jeff “Law Tech Guru” Beard has a helpful post today for those trying to decide what to do when the other shoe finally drops in the Blackberry patent saga.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
This post brought to you by Dennis Kennedy’s legal technology consulting services, featuring RSS and blogging consulting, technology audit, strategic planning and technology committee coaching packages especially for medium-sized law firms (15 – 100 lawyers) and corporate legal departments. More information on the “Second Pair of Eyes” packages for legal technology audits and strategic planning may be found here (PDF).
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Is There a Web-based Search Tool for Digests of Court Cases Involving Electronic Evidence?

Tuesday, February 7th, 2006

My friends and electronic discovery wizards Sharon Nelson and John Simek at Sensei Enterprises have just unveiled a handy search engine that allows you to research electronic evidence cases in their database of digested versions of relevant court decisions. The Electronic Evidence Case Digest is found at http://www.senseient.com/case_search.asp . Add this one to your electronic discovery toolbox.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
This post brought to you by Dennis Kennedy’s half-day electronic discovery seminar – “Preparing for the New World of Electronic Discovery: Easing Your Transition from Paper to Electronic Discovery.” Contact Dennis today for more information and to schedule a seminar for your firm or legal department.
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What Was Worse: the Super Bowl Game, the Commercials or the Rolling Stones?

Monday, February 6th, 2006

I must admit how I am flummoxed at how people who brag about how they use their Tivos to skip commercials seem to watch and study commercials during the Super Bowl.
However, let me address the question.
1. The game was not very good, but Hines Ward had an MVP game and the Jerome Bettis story line was a great one. And the Steelers had a atrick play that worked. The game was not the worst of the three choices, although the clock management of the Seahawks at the end of the first half and at the end of the game reminded me why I don’t like to watch college football games anymore.
2. Admittedly, I don’t get the fascination with commercials, but I did see a colleague from my old law firm, Andy Puzder, now CEO of Hardee’s in a commercial. Being able to say that you know someone in a Super Bowl commercial is kind of cool. So, for admittedly a personal reason, the commercials were not the worst, although I think most of the advertisers would have gotten a zillion times more bang for the buck by advertising on blogs – but you knew I would say that.
3. With all the prep for this event, did anyone think of doing a sound check for the Rolling Stones? The sound was terrible. The recording of “Start Me Up” that plays over the PA at every sporting event must sound about ten times better. I don’t think that we need an extended version of “Satisfaction” last night or ever. I found myself thinking, “Let’s get back to the game. Will this ever end?” Yet another of those odd cultural events that was better in concept than reality. So, the Rolling Stones get my vote as the worst of the three.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
This post brought to you by Dennis Kennedy’s half-day electronic discovery seminar – “Preparing for the New World of Electronic Discovery: Easing Your Transition from Paper to Electronic Discovery.” Contact Dennis today for more information and to schedule a seminar for your firm or legal department.

What Happens to Blogs, Email and the Rest of Your Online Presence When You Die?

Monday, February 6th, 2006

Scott Reeves (Forbes) has a good article called “What happens to your e-mail when you die?” that addresses some of the issues involving email, blogs, websites and the rest of your online empire that arise when you die. These issues will only continue to grow in importance.
Tax professor blogger Jim Maule and I were quoted in another good article on probate and estate planning issues we will increasingly be running into as we move to an Internet society. The article, by Susan Shor, is called “Digital Property and the Laws of Inheritance” Read it along with the Forbes article and you will get a good intro to these issues.
I like this quote from me that was used in the article:

If someone dies, there are a lot of people who should be notified. The fact that someone has died is very meaningful and a paper address book may not have closest friends. Those people who are known mainly through e-mail or online may wonder what happened. By the time things get sorted out, the funeral is long over, and it’s too late.

Estate planning and probate law is another area of law in which the Internet is having some surprising consequences. If you have a significant online presence and intellectual property, you probably want to do some shopping around for a lawyer who understands the value of what you have and the implications of what must happen when you die to pass the value of what you have to your survivors.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Like what you are reading? Check out the other blogs where I post – Between Lawyers (feed) and the LexThink Blog (feed).bb

What’s the LexThink! Lounge and How Can You Be Part of It?

Friday, February 3rd, 2006

Matt Homann has announced the next of our public LexThink! events – the LexThink! Lounge on April 19. Matt has all the details in his post, but here are some highlights:
When: April 19, 2006
Where: Chicago
Presented by: Dennis Kennedy, Matt Homann and JoAnna Forshee.
What: A salon-like gathering of some of the brightest minds in legal technology today (100 invited guests).
Beginning at 4:00 pm, and continuing into the evening, the LexThink! Lounge will combine LexThink! collaborative brainstorming techniques, Open Space facilitation, and small discussion groups with fine food and drink to create an amazing atmosphere for in-depth discussions about the future of legal technology, with a special “5 by 5″ panel discussion featuring some people you will really want to hear. And bowling.
We’re working on both the sponsors and the invitation list. If you want to attend or become a sponsor, let Matt know – matt @ lexthink.com. (You can contact me, too.)
Many of the attendees will be alumni/ae of the previous LexThink events, like the wonderful and generous Yvonne Divita, who has written recently about what she liked about the LexThink approach to conferences and events.
While LexThink is best known for the public events, we also do private retreats and unconferences for organizations. Contact us for more details about out private conference options.
I hope to see you at LexThink! Lounge.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
This post brought to you by LexThink!(TM) – The Conference, Re-imagined. LexThink! – Think big thoughts, do cool things, change the world. Ask us about private LexThink retreats and conferences for your firm, business or organization. Coming soon – LexThink! Lounge – April 19, 2006.
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Did You Want to Clarify that You Are NOT Part of the USALAW.com Blog Network?

Friday, February 3rd, 2006

I definitely want to clarify that and correct any misimpression people may have.
One of the best things about my trip to LegalTech was that I got a number of opportunities to talk with Kevin O’Keefe, who I have long admired as one of the pioneers in the use of the Internet by lawyers. Check out this roundtable article we did with Kevin from back in 2000 about virtual communities to learn more about his background and get some insights into his innovative thinking about ways lawyers might use the Internet.
I read Kevin’s recent post on the USALAW.com blog network and found myself nodding my head in agreement as I read about the concerns he expressed.
It would be very easy for someone going to that site to see a listing of excerpts of my posts on this blog and conclude that I had applied for and was part of that blog network. THAT IS ABSOLUTELY NOT THE CASE.
I want to make it clear that I have no involvement in the USALAW.com blog network WHATSOEVER. I have not talked with them and, like Kevin, was not asked for permission to have excerpts put on their site. Although what they are doing may qualify as “fair use,” I am concerned that people think that I am part of their blog network, endorse it or receive financial benefit from it. THAT IS NOT THE CASE.
It is very likely that my blog will become part of a blog network in the near future and I do not want people to be confused about which network I might be in. In addition, I do not want to lose opportunities to be invited into another blog network because people mistakenly believe I am part of the USALAW.com blog network.
It is possible to repurpose RSS feeds in many ways these days and probably many of those ways will technically qualify as “fair use.”
HOWEVER, I have two simple rules for blog networks and other aggregation sites whose business model presumably involves making money, through ads or otherwise, by aggregating other people’s feeds or “repurposing” their content where there is no license that explicitly allows for that:
1. Ask yourself how you would feel if someone else took your writing or other creative work and used it in the way you intend to use other peoples’ work.
2. Notify people and ask permission, at least as a courtesy, when you “repurpose” their feeds on an ongoing basis, even if you think it is “fair use.” Most of the time I will say yes (I let people reprint my articles and posts on a regular basis), but I hate to learn from someone else that my content is appearing somewhere else and that people think that I am involved in the other site, especially when I know nothing about the other site or who is behind it. And I really don’t like it when I’m talking to someone about joining a blog network, since it makes it look like I am part of another blog network.
I’ve already posted a notice about another site that I am not associated with. I’m hoping I do not need to set up a new category for posts in which I announce that I am not associated with blogs or aggregation sites. Just ask me about what you plan to do – it’s really easy to do.
Read Kevin’s post – he makes some excellent points.
As a final point, as we continue to move into a more commercialized blog era, bloggers do not want to find out that someone unknown to them is making more money off their content than they are, unless they have applied a Creative Commons or other license that allows others to do so. I have not.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Like what you are reading? Check out the other blogs where I post – Between Lawyers (feed) and the LexThink Blog (feed).

Are You in a New Podcast and Will You Be Doing More Podcasts?

Friday, February 3rd, 2006

My latest podcast appearance was posted earlier this week. If you want to hear some more of my thoughts on the future of legal technology and where technology is taking the practice of law, I’m interviewed as part of a new podcast from Thomson West, which can be found here and is identified as “Episode 2.” I had a great time talking with Leonard Lee, who did the interview, before, during and after the actual interview.
Tom Mighell and I have been discussing and starting to work on a podcast series that we hope to launch by the first of March. And, yes, we would be interested in talking about sponsorship options. Tom and I will be presenting a session on podcasting at ABA TECHSHOW 2006 in April.
Also, I’ve been talking with the very knowledgeable Anthony Reading of Aspen Conferencing about doing videocasts on legal technology topics with tech trainer extraordinaire, Adriana Linares, and perhaps other videocasts with others as well.
I’ve become intrigued lately by the development of Internet media tools and ways they can be used as information channels for materials that are better seen or heard than read.
I’ve done some earlier podcasts with Randy Holloway and Zane Safrit. I also have done a series of short webinars on electronic discovery as part of Merrill’s On-demand Seminars and will have some audio seminars appearing soon on the DigiLearn Online site.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
This post brought to you by LexThink!(TM) – The Conference, Re-imagined. LexThink! – Think big thoughts, do cool things, change the world. Ask us about private LexThink retreats and conferences for your firm, business or organization. Coming soon – LexThink Lounge – April 19, 2006.

Will You Be Making Your Slides for Your Electronic Discovery Trends Presentation at LegalTech NY 2006 Available?

Thursday, February 2nd, 2006

I’ve put a PDF file (approx. 600K download) of a 3 slides per page handout of my PowerPoint slides from my recent presentation “Electronic Discovery Technology Trends for 2006″ on my website for free download. The URL for the PDF file is http://www.denniskennedy.com/pdfs/Kennedy2006EDDTrendsppt.pdf.
I’ll write more about my experiences at LegalTech NY over the next few days (it was great), but I especially enjoyed the chance (thanks to my friends at Caselogistix) to give this presentation. I really liked the way the presentation turned out and am pleased by the very positive response I got to the presentation. It was a great audience to work with.
Rob Robinson posted some photos from the presentation here. A special thanks to Tom Mighell for his inspired last-minute idea to get a balky projector to show these slides during the actual presentation.
Download PDF of slides.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
This post brought to you by Dennis Kennedy’s half-day electronic discovery seminar – “Preparing for the New World of Electronic Discovery: Easing Your Transition from Paper to Electronic Discovery.” Contact Dennis today for more information and to schedule a seminar for your firm or legal department.
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