Technology-Lawyer

Dennis Kennedy

Technology Law and Legal Technology. Dennis Kennedy is one of the few technology lawyers who is also an expert on the underlying technologies. Dennis an award-winning leader in the application of technology and the Internet to the practice of law. DennisKennedy.com gives you access to a wide variety of Dennis Kennedy's resources on legal technology, his writings, his well-known blog, DennisKennedy.Blog, and information about how you can have Dennis speak to your organization or group.

Dennis Kennedy is one of the most knowledgeable legal technologists you will find. - Michael Arkfeld.

Dennis Kennedy, a lawyer and legal technology expert in St. Louis, Mo., has been a significant influence in the ever-evolving relationship between lawyers and the Web. - Robert Ambrogi

Archive for March, 2006

Where are the Lawyers at Legal Technology Seminars These Days?

Thursday, March 30th, 2006

The nice people at IKON put on a great legal technology seminar in St. Louis yesterday. I learned a lot and took a lot of notes. Among other things, there was great coverage of electronic discovery, records management and legal tech from the corporate law department point of view (something I call “client-driven technology”).
It was well-attended (more than 70 people), but when they “qualified the audience,” there were only a handful of lawyers in the room.
The rest were IT staff, paralegals and legal administrators. I’ve noticed this trend over the last several months as I’ve attended legal technology and electronic discovery seminar sessions that are increasingly made up of IT people rather than lawyers.
Maybe I’m off target, but I feel that lawyers should want to hear a representative from the legal department of a major corporation talk about where they would like to go with their technology and how their law firms could help them. They might also like to know where their clients feel that their law firms are not responsive enough.
If you want one “take-away” to consider carefully, it was this: corporate legal departments are increasingly being called on to be part of the business team in terms of budgeting and other standard business approaches. Law firms that do not help them do that should expect to find a growing impatience. Electronic billing is one way to help.
I learned a good deal about the current state of affairs in electronic discovery, compliance and records management, and other things as well, but, looking back on my notes, I can’t help but notice this comment – “What is the mix of this audience and where are the lawyers?”
If you are one of those lawyers who seem to be staying away from good educational events on legal technology, let me encourage you to attend ABA TECHSHOW 2006. Hope to see you there. I guarantee that you’ll get a competitive advantage over the lawyers who seem to be isolating themselves from learning about the leading technology issues of the day that are front-and-center for their clients.
My thank you goes out to IKON for inviting me to this seminar and I’m glad I had a gap in my schedule to attend it. Well worth it and, if this show comes to your town, I recommend it.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Learn more about legal technology at Dennis Kennedy’s Legal Technology Central page.
Technorati tags:

Keeping Your Mobile Phone or PDA with You For Always

Wednesday, March 29th, 2006

Martin Geddes at the Telepocalypse blog reports on a “just when you thought you had heard of everything” story of people being buried with their cell phones at their sides in their caskets.
No reports yet of people being buried wearing those headsets with the bright blue LEDs. However, there are apparently stories of people being buried with extra batteries.
Hey, if you consider what ancient pharoahs and royalty have been buried with, maybe it’s no so strange.
Well . . . yes, it is strange.
In my case (thank you Verizon), my reception six feet underground probably cannot be any worse than the reception I get on my cell phone at my house.
By the way, I like how Martin turns this weird story into a lesson that he draws about the telcom industry. I met and had dinner with Martin last year after the Chicago BlogWalk and was greatly impressed with his knowledge of the telcom industry and its trends and challenges. Be sure to read his whole post.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
This post brought to you by LexThink!(R) – The Legal Unconference. Ask us about private LexThink retreats and conferences for your firm, business or organization. Coming soon – LexThink Lounge – April 19, 2006.

Congratulations to Evan Schaeffer on a Year of Podcasting Legally

Tuesday, March 28th, 2006

I listened today to Evan Schaeffer’s Legal Underground Podcast #47, which is his un-anniversary podcast honoring his first anniversary of podcasting.
As always, it’s well-produced, witty, insightful and very professional. If you wondered what podcasting is and how lawyers might use it, this is a great podcast to check out. It’s just over 8 minutes long, so it’s an easy one to get on your to-listen list.
Longtime readers of this blog, especially those with sharp memories, will recall that Evan’s podcast won my 2005 Blawggie Award for Best Legal Podcast.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
This post brought to you by LexThink!(R) – The Legal Unconference. Ask us about private LexThink retreats and conferences for your firm, business or organization. Coming soon – LexThink Lounge – April 19, 2006.
Technorati tags:

BlawgWorld 2006 eBook Now Available for Public Download

Tuesday, March 28th, 2006

TechnoLawyer’s BlawgWorld 2006 is a great sampler of useful, thought-provoking and enjoyable blog posts from more than fifty of the many law-related blogs out there these days, including two posts from me – one from this blog and one from the Between Lawyers blog. Download it for free here.
BlawgWorld 2006 gives those new to the world of blogging a great sampling of the range and nature of the law-related blogs. It’s not comprehensive, or even designed to be, but it’s a very nice sampler, especially for those who have heard about blogs, but haven’t really read any blogs yet.
Although it’s easy for people these days to over-think and over-discuss the whole “blogging phenomenon,” I will note that if you read through BlawgWorld 2006, you’ll see why I’ve begun to describe blogs as “online newspaper or magazine columns without the newspaper or magazine.” Don’t think so much about the items in the eBook as part of “blogging,” just view them as short, informative and enjoyable articles.
Download it for free here.
blawgworldbook.png
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
This post brought to you by LexThink!(R) – The Legal Unconference. Ask us about private LexThink retreats and conferences for your firm, business or organization. Coming soon – LexThink Lounge – April 19, 2006.
Technorati tags:

National Sleep Awareness Week 2006 Starts Today

Monday, March 27th, 2006

I’ll be ringing in National Sleep Awareness Week this evening by taking a follow-up sleep study tonight. As some of you know, I’m among the estimated 18 million Americans trying to deal with sleep apnea. My condition has lasted several years and is characterized as mild-to-moderate (but still difficult). I have made some significant improvement and have gotten praise from my doctors for doing everything they suggest.
As a result, I’ve become a big advocate for getting sleep-tested when the symptoms are apparent (male, over 40, snorer, 17″ neck size, to name a few). For more info, check out this article and Wikipedia entry.
If you have sleep apnea or know someone who does (or might have), the best resource I’ve found is Paretz Lavie’s excellent book, Restless Nights.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Like what you are reading? Check out the other blogs where I post – Between Lawyers (feed) and the LexThink Blog (feed).
Technorati tags:

SaaS: The Next Big Thing?

Sunday, March 26th, 2006

Eric Knorr’s InfoWorld article called “Software as a Service: The Next Big Thing” is a great overview of the current state of affairs in the world of the “hot” Software as a Service (“SaaS”) trend.
Although it’s tempting to see SaaS as the old Application Service Provider model with a new name, those in the SaaS industry see some important differences, or at least some important evolutionary developments. This article helps you see those differences.
The article points to Salesforce.com as a leader in SaaS and, more specifically, its AppExchange as the key development to watch in this area.
Even though the following quote is pretty technical and jargon-laden, you will be well rewarded for unpacking this one, making it my money quote:

The ultimate disruptive effect of the “services wave” may well resemble that of the dot-com era, when companies that were smart about leveraging the Web exploited unforeseen growth opportunities. As the viral growth of Web 2.0 mash-ups and walled gardens like AppExchange make clear, every true SaaS application is potentially part of an XML-driven ecosystem.

As you probably know, I’ve long been a fan of the ASP, hosted services or SaaS model as a technology strategy and have written and spoken about it on many occasions over the years.
You can also read about my thoughts on the unique legal issues raised by SaaS approaches in Jennifer Jones’s ComputerWorld article called “Data Diligence.”
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Learn more about legal technology at Dennis Kennedy’s Legal Technology Central page.
Technorati tags:

Replay of Law Firm Tech Committee Webinar Available

Sunday, March 26th, 2006

Aspen Conferencing has made the replay of my recent video webinar “Best Practices for Law Firm Technology Committees” available for free viewing. You can view it here (https://ase.on.raindance.com/confmgr/view_stored_doc.jsp? docId=91919523631781116747306485130&docType=recording).
I encourage you to check it out and let me know what you think.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Learn more about legal technology at Dennis Kennedy’s Legal Technology Central page. This post brought to you by Dennis Kennedy’s legal technology consulting services, featuring RSS and blogging consulting, technology audit, strategic planning and technology committee coaching packages especially for medium-sized law firms (15 – 100 lawyers) and corporate legal departments. More information on the “Second Pair of Eyes” packages for legal technology audits and strategic planning may be found here (PDF).
Technorati tags:

Introduction to the OODA Loop and its Business Implications

Thursday, March 23rd, 2006

I mention John Boyd’s OODA Loop on this blog from time to time. OODA is an acronym for Observe – Orient – Decide – Act. I’m fascinated by the OODA Loop literature and the discussions around the topic.
Chet Richards, one of the leading thinkers on the OODA Loop, has recently made available his PowerPoint slides for a briefing that explains the OODA Loop. The presentation is an excellent introduction and I especially recommend it to anyone who wonders what the heck I’m talking about when I mention the OODA Loop.
I also recommend it to those who might like to join a conversation with me about the implications of the OODA Loop in the practice of law and Law 2.0.
Perhaps an even better introduction to the business implications of the OODA Loop and Boyd’s thinking bbis Richards’ Certain to Win PowerPoint presentation (with lots of notes).
If you want to dig deeper into to this very rich vein, I thoroughly recommend Robert Coram’s Boyd: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of War and Chet Richards’ Certain to Win.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
This post brought to you by LexThink!(R) – The Legal Unconference. Ask us about private LexThink retreats and conferences for your firm, business or organization. Coming soon – LexThink Lounge – April 19, 2006.
Technorati tags:

Strategic Planning Tips for Mid-sized Law Firms (and Others)

Thursday, March 23rd, 2006

I’m a fan of Tom Collins and his More Partner Income blog. Today, he features a guest post from John Remsen, Jr. called “Keys to Successful Strategic Planning.”
It’s a good list of sound, solid information with an eye toward the needs of mid-sized firms.
The money quote:

Many midsized firms seem to think that strategic planning is for larger firms. However, any firm with an eye toward the future can benefit from the process. Planning can help a firm develop a consensus on key big-picture issues, promote internal communication within the firm, inspire attorneys to get out and do things they wouldn’t otherwise do, and help the firm allocate its resources more effectively.

My favorite tip relates to measuring and rewarding desired behavior.
A good strategic plan makes your technology (and other) decisions so much easier. If you have a good strategic plan, you’ll see the benefits of creating a strategic technology plan for your firm, something that really makes sense in the mid-sized law firm category.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
This post brought to you by Dennis Kennedy’s legal technology consulting services, featuring RSS and blogging consulting, technology audit, strategic planning and technology committee coaching packages especially for medium-sized law firms (15 – 100 lawyers) and corporate legal departments. More information on the “Second Pair of Eyes” packages for legal technology audits and strategic planning may be found here (PDF).
Technorati tags:

Trimming Your News Aggregator Subscriptions

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2006

Fred Faulkner’s “Information Overload = Loss in Productivity: Trimming Down the News Aggregator Fat” offers some good practical tips for people who feel that they have subscribed to too many RSS feeds from blogs and other resources. How many is too many? Well, that can vary – see my post called “Heart of Blogness.”
Here are a few techniques I use:
1. Saved Searches. Most newsreaders allow you to run searches over all of the posts in your newsreader. I have a set of saved searches on terms of interest to me (e.g., ABA TECHSHOW or LexThink). These “saved search” folders will locate any posts from all of the feeds to which you subscribe that contain those terms. In a certain sense, they make the total number of feeds to which you subscribe irrelevant. You can easily get to the posts that interest you. Long-term potential problem: too many saved searches.
2. The “River of News” approach. There’s no requirement that you read every post in every feed in your aggregator. Think of a newspaper – you don’t read every item in a newspaper. Your news aggregator will probably have a folder that collects all items that are from “today” or “unread.” Simply scroll through, as if browsing a newspaper, and read what catches your attention without considering which blog or feed the item comes from. If you build up a backlog of unread posts, simply mark them “read” and move forward. Again, in this approach, there’s no real need to limit your number of subscribed feeds.
3. “Page 1 / Page 2.” I used to organized subscribed feeds in folders by category. However, the number of category folders can grow and your system can become unwieldy. I’m now trying an approach that is almost the reverse of Steve Nipper’s “probation folder” approach. I have a “Page 1″ folder and a “Page 2″ folder. The Page 1 folder contains feeds I like to read on a daily basis. “Page 2″ is everything else. I may move items from Page 1 to Page 2 and vice versa on a regular basis. As you might expect, I tend to read most of the items in Page 1. I tend not to read most of the items in Page 2 (but, remember that I’m catching the items that interest me in Page 2 with my saved searches or I may see them if I am reading in the “River of News” mode).
I haven’t found it to be a good use of time to do a lot of trimming of feeds, although I will delete a good number of feeds from time to time. If I find a new feed, I’ll subscribe to it and throw into Page 2 (or, rarely, right into Page 1). If something continues to catch my attention, I’ll move it into Page 1.
I’ve found that this combination of approaches serves me well and offers me several techniques to use depending on the time I have available, what my mood is and other factors.
It also seems to scale pretty well as you move up in the number of feeds. I prefer to add a few more feeds that try to delete feeds that I basically like in order to get down to an arbitrary number of feed subscriptions.
By the way, if you don’t use a news aggregator and this seems oh-so-arcane to you, remember that (assuming that you are reading this post on my blog) you can get each of my new blog posts delivered to you automatically via email by using the Feedblitz subscription form in the left column of the front page of my blog.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Learn more about legal technology at Dennis Kennedy’s Legal Technology Central page.
Technorati tags: