Your Innovation Style

What is your innovation style? One theory suggests that there are four styles of innovators.
The Innovation Tools blog has a post called “New tool for innovation team design: Innovation Styles Online” that discusses and points to a great website, InnovationStyles, with some tests and other tools, that will help you determine your innovation style and learn more about innovation styles, how to recognize them and the role of stylles in teams.
Near the bottom of the post on Innovation Tools, you’ll find a link called “Discover your own innovation style (through October 31, 2006)” that will let you take an online test to determine your innovation style. Try it out.
Those who know me probably won’t be too surprised that I fell under the Exploring style.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
This post brought to you by LexThink!(R) – The Legal Unconference. Ask us about private LexThink retreats and conferences for your firm, business or organization.
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Mickey Spillane, RIP; Mike Hammer in the 21st Century

I’m a fan of classic American film noir and the hard-boiled detective novel genre.
I decided to mark the recent passing of one of the masters of the genre, Mickey Spillane, by rereading two excellent collections of Mike Hammer novels: The Mike Hammer Collection, Volume 1 and The Mike Hammer Collection, Volume 2.
Each volume has three novels. Each novel grabs you and compels you to read it from start to finish.
I like the spare and lean writing style, the relentless narrative pace and the twists and turns. It’s tough and violent and a great read, although not for those with gentle sensibilities.
I’m intrigued at how the novels seem to bet set so concretely in and capture a specific era and place – New York City in the 1950s – and, yet, it in intriguing way, also capture something essential about our current times, if you suspend judgment and let the stories take you for the ride.
There are still a few more weeks left in summer and it’s hard to find a better set of summer reads.
There’s even a legal angle: the book “I, the Jury” may change how you think about juries.
Anyway, I found my re-reading of these collections a good and appropriate way to mark the passing of another American icon.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Like what you are reading? Check out the other blogs where I post – Between Lawyers (feed) and the LexThink Blog (feed).
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Innovation + Action = InnovAction

Here’s a must-read PDF download for anyone interested in innovation in the legal profession:
InnovAction_Cover_Page_01.jpg
The College of Law Practice Management has just released the Inaugural issue of its e-publication called InnovAction, which celebrates innovation in the legal profession.
I’m pleased to be part of a stellar cast of authors featured in this first issue.
In fact, I highly recommend that you read the wide-ranging Roundtable on innovation topics in which I participated with Merrilyn Astin Tarlton, Simon Chester, Matt Homann and Dan Pinnington. Some of the learning Matt and I have had over the past year or so in our LexThink venture made their way into this article.
You’ll also find great articles from Gerry Riskin, Patrick McKenna, David Maister, Silvia Coulter, and Bruce MacEwen, and other great stuff. Kudos to Jordan Furlong for bringing this project to a successful launch.
Download the article here.
While you are downloading great e-publications, be sure to check out Patrick McKenna’s highly-regarded new publication called First 100 Days: Transitioning a New Managing Partner.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
This post brought to you by LexThink!(R) – The Legal Unconference. Ask us about private LexThink retreats and conferences for your firm, business or organization.
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Checking in with Elvis

I never met or talked with Elvis Presley, but I once had a late night conversation with an Elvis impersonator that probably was even better than the real thing.
I was thinking about that and my recent “Shuffle Me This” post (note: when Evan Schaeffer writes about one of my posts, I know I’ve done a good job) this morning as I was driving. I knew today was the anniversary of the day Elvis Presley died.
I had the iPod on shuffle and it played a live version of Joe Grushecky’s “Talking to the King,” a song about Elvis. This evening, it popped out a song called “Harbor Lights” from Elvis’s Sun Sessions.
Coincidence? I don’t think so.
If you’re thinking about Elvis today, you might enjoy my late night conversation post.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Like what you are reading? Check out the other blogs where I post – Between Lawyers (feed) and the LexThink Blog (feed).
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Using PowerPoint Slides to Avoid or Enhance Communication

I really enjoy good PowerPoint presentations. Unfortunately, it’s kinda rare to see them, especially in the world of lawyerdom.
On the other hand, the only thing more boring than bad PowerPoint slides is another round of broadly dismissive general pronouncements that PowerPoint is evil. It always seems like blaming the tool for the way it is used. There are times that slides work really well and other times when you want to use a different approach.
The issue is always communication and reaching your audience with a message that works for them. If you are doing that, you’ll be surprised at how great people think your PowerPoint slides are.
With that in mind, I recommend that anyone who uses PowerPoint slides to present and anyone who spends time as part of an audience for a speaker who uses PowerPoint slides, read carefully a post on the Presentation Zen blog called “PowerPoint printouts used for communicating battle plans?”
This post, and the underlying post from that prompted the post from the Arms and Influence blog, will give you a great primer on the different ways PowerPoint slides can be used and the nuances you need to consider when you use slides in different ways.
The money quote:

In the end, I don’t think PPT is the cause but rather the symptom of a very large and very complex communication problem here.

By way of comparison, I recently found a set of PowerPoint slides from Chet Richards a great way to learn about first through fourth generation warfare and elements of military strategy. I’m not sure that I would have found a long single-spaced paper on the topic nearly as accessible and useful to me.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Learn more about legal technology at Dennis Kennedy’s Legal Technology Central page.
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