Eversheds Outsources IT Systems: Sign of the Law 2.0 Times?

In my writings and presentations over the years, I’ve often commented that law firms need to take a good hard look at what business they are really in, what are their core competencies, and whether it makes sense for firms to continue to try to handle all IT operations in house. This is especially true in the case of large electronic discovery efforts.
TheLawyer.com reports that Eversheds has asked itself those questions and decided to outsource its IT systems.
The money quote:

Eversheds UK managing partner Bryan Hughes said: “We’re a law firm, not a specialist IT provider and this, coupled with the fact that we had finite internal resources, meant that we could never be at the cutting edge of legal technology.”

The short article also indicates that we might be seeing the start of a trend, especially in the UK. There’s much to think about in both the above quote and the few paragraphs in this article.
There’s a good roundtable article on outsourcing in Law Practice Today called “Inside vs. Outside: When Does it Make Sense for Law Firms to Outsource?” and Tom Mighell has a good list of legal outsourcing resources here.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Learn more about electronic discovery at Dennis Kennedy’s Electronic Discovery Resources page.
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Comments

  1. says

    As e-discovery technologies become more advanced and complex, the need for outsourcing becomes more essential. The expertise needed to complete such data retrieval and review goes beyond what attorneys are able to analyze in-house. With companies like Cataphora, Inc. paving the way, this next-generation of comprehensive search is allowing a level of transparency never before contemplated in the legal system and law firms are forced to realize that they are not only unprepared for the change, but also unqualified for the work. Outsourcing is essential for their success and will only become more important as time goes on.