Ross Kodner on the Difference between IT and Legal Tech; Laura Orr on Blogging

Two posts of note today for those interested in legal tech and blogging, which I guess would be most readers of this blog.
First, Ross Kodner has a great post on the differences between legal technology and information technology (IT). It’s a great discussion-starter and should make you think. Highly recommended.
The money quote:

A mistake I’ve observed SO many firms of ALL sizes across the continent is confusing IT and LT – not making, or not knowing there is a fundamental distinction between these two areas of information.

My short take is that legal technology focuses on lawyers, how they work, and technology that helps lawyers do their work better.
Second, Laura Orr has a great post chock full of great tips on blogging for lawyers. It was nice to see the reference to me, even though it reminded me that I really don’t write or speak as much on blogging as I used to.
Among Laura’s excellent tips, is one I want to highlight that’s both simple and often overlooked:

Open an email account for your blog.

My best advice to starting bloggers is to find one or two of the blogging “rules” that you can break when you do your blog. Personal voice, more so than strict obedience of blogging best practices, is the key to a great blog (and a great blogging experience. That said, you won’t find many better digests of the best blogging practices than Laura’s post.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Coming in March from ABA Publishing – The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.
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Comments

  1. says

    Dennis, thanks for posting about my entry today on Ross Ipsa Loquitur about the distinction between IT and LT and how law firms confuse one for the other, when in reality, all practices need both sources of guidance and advice. It’s so fundamental – and has always been true – from the first days of legal computing. But it’s still one of the key mistakes most practices seem to make. Thanks again for reaffirming the issue.