Dennis Kennedy’s Links of the Week – February 24, 2008

Links of the Week is a regular feature on this blog where I list some of the most interesting links I’ve found during the previous week – sort of a “best of” from my Google Reader Shared Items. The idea is that I pick out a set of links that I might have wanted to write about or that I found especially thought-provoking or useful. I might or might not agree with the posts or items I link to, but I found them to be something I wanted to share.
In general, I’m just going to give a link to the item, without any explanation. I’ll try to do this every weekend, and I’ll include the latest additions to my 52 books in 52 weeks project.
This week’s links:
Predicting the Future of E-Discovery
The Most Frequestly Used Features in Microsoft Office
7 Ways to Write with Numbered Lists
The Answer to the Toughest Interview Question
Interview with Linus Torvalds
Thinking Inside the Box
Must-Read Essay on Our Changing Profession
Success Secrets of Olympic Athletes
Cover Me
Alan Turing, Cloud Computing and IT’s Future
How Vulnerable is Google on Search?
Cold Boot Attacks on Disk Encryption
Give an Old Laptop New Life with Cheap (or Free) Projects
The Case for Collaboration Among Lawyers
KETC – The Future of Public TV – A Perspective
Seven Steps to Revolution
Inbox Heaven: The Ultimate Email Setup
This Week’s Additions to 52 Books in 52 Weeks:
The Art of Learning, by Josh Waitzkin

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Read the blog posts and RSS feed items I find most interesting on Google Reader Shared Items or subscribe to its RSS feed. High volume, but lots of interesting items that will get you thinking.
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By Request: What’s Your Best Advice for a Lawyer Wanting to Start a Solo Practice?

With the economy looking a little shaky (or more than a little shaky) and some rumblings already about law firms considering laying off lawyers, the solo option will become a consideration for many lawyers in 2008.
The short answer to your question is to find a great mentor. However, that’s really the answer to any question about the practice of law and it’s easier said than done.
In my own case, the advice I got that really stuck with me was to be sure to be able to identify exactly where your first client from a client would come from. That simple exercise helps you move from fantasy to reality.
In my recent Blawggie awards, I singled out the solo practice blogs as being a great resource for solos and aspiring solos. You’ll want to do some reading there.
This question also gives me the chance to single out and praise Carolyn Elefant’s new book, Solo by Choice: How to Be the Lawyer You Always Wanted to Be. I had the privilege of reading a pre-publication version of the book and wrote the following short blurb about it:

Carolyn Elefant’s new book continues the tradition of her MyShingle.com website, which I once called “the perfect example of a great web resource.” It’s chock-full of exactly the practical advice I was looking for when I left a big firm to go solo. Highly recommended.

It’s the most current of the books about solo practice. It’s also worth tracking down a copy of the latest edition of Flying Solo (you’ll find a few chapters in there that I wrote) and, of course, Jay Foonberg’s classic, How to Start and Build a Law Firm.
However, after having left a large firm to go out on my own almost five years ago and spent a good deal of time thinking about the solo practice and how best to prepare for it and improve how you do it, I’ve recently found a resource that I plan to recommend so much that people will get tired of hearing it from me.
The best advice I can give right now is to watch regularly and study BBC’s Gordon Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares.

My cable company shows it on Thursday nights on BBC America, but you can also buy a DVD. I’ve recently started watching it and it’s a revelation to me. There’s so much that I can see in the show that I wish I would have known earlier.
In the show, restaurateur, chef and absolute master of dropping the F-bomb, Gordon Ramsay, visits and tries to turn around a struggling restaurant and its struggling chef and owner. What is key for a solo practice is how he helps you walk the line between business and profession, accounting and art.
If I were thinking of starting a solo practice now, I’d watch episode after episode of this until I started to see the repeating patterns, the common issues and the common solutions. It really does start to become clear what will work and what won’t (at least in concept – implementation and execution are vital factors as well). It strikes me that in the successful situations there is a fascinating balance between being ruthless objective about what you are doing and, at the same time, being very passionate about the service and product that you provide. In addition to some valuable business lessons that you’ll see play out in a number of settings, you will also get a feel for whether the life of running a business is something that you want to have. I can’t recommend immersing yourself in this show enough, and you will also get the side benefit of learning a whole lot about good food and fantastic new ways to use swear words.
That’s my best advice these days. That, and to be willing to be ruthlessly honest with yourself about whether or not the solo life really fits you. You do not want to become a effing solo practice nightmare.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
If you enjoy this blog, remember it has its own Amazon Wishlist and appreciates your generosity. ;-)
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By Request: What Will You Be Speaking About at TECHSHOW?

Yes, ABA TECHSHOW is getting closer and I’ve recently been working on the slides for my presentations, having volunteered to take on the task of creating the first drafts of the slides.
First of all, let me once again say that every lawyer who wants to learn about and get better with technology (and every lawyer is on his or her firm’s technology committee) really should try to attend one of the major legal technology conferences at least every couple of years. TECHSHOW is a great show for practicing lawyers because there is so much emphasis on the actual sessions and the sessions are directed at the interests of practicing lawyers. I’m a little biased in favor of TECHSHOW because I spent a couple of years on the TECHSHOW Board, but I also have spent time trying to figure out the differences among the major legal tech shows and the focus on practicing lawyers is what I consider the differentiator for TECHSHOW. Don’t get me wrong, I like all the shows (and was disappointed to miss LegalTech NY this year), but each has its unique strengths and audiences. You still have plenty of time to register for TECHSHOW.
But on to your question.
I’ll be speaking at two sessions, both on Friday, March 14, with two of my favorite co-presenters, Dan Pinnington and Tom Mighell.
Dan and I will be speaking at a session called “The Virtual Law Office: Is Software-as-a-Service Ready for Prime Time?” Long-time readers of this blog and my articles will know that the odds are very high that my answer will be “yes,” but Dan and I plan to take a realistic and practical look at SaaS and the pros and cons for practicing lawyers. We have some new ideas for presenting this topic that I think people will like.
Tom and I are doing a session called “Working Together Wherever You Are: The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaborating on the Internet.” As the program description says: “Collaboration is no longer an option. Online tools like WebEx, Sharepoint, Acrobat Connect, Basecamp, Zoho, wikis and others make it easy for lawyers to work instantaneously with clients and colleagues, whether they’re across the hall or on the other side of the world. Come join the authors of a soon-to-be published ABA book on collaborative technologies as they discuss the options available to lawyers, developing a collaboration strategy, and the ethical implications of working with others in an online environment.” Yes, this session marks the official launch of our book, which is now at the printers and scheduled to debut at TECHSHOW. It looks like this:
COLLABORATIONcover200x286.jpg
Tom and I are also hosting one of the TECHSHOW dinner events for attendees on Friday night, giving TECHSHOW attendees a chance to talk about collaboration tools and technologies with us.
As usual, I will do everything I can to make myself accessible to readers of this blog while at TECHSHOW. Please say hello. I’d be delighted to see you at my sessions.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Coming Soon: The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.
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By Request Posts Coming Soon

Got a little busier than I expected, so the blawgiversary series of posts hasn’t happened yet (always a danger of pre-announcing what you’ll do on your blog). Got the birthday celebrated, the book is at the printers and on schedule for a debut at ABA TECHSHOW, and watching the lunar eclipse here tonight took the place of catching up on the blog.
I’ve been working on some by request posts and will probably do them as a batch in the next couple of days.
If you have questions for me that you’d like to see answered as a “by request” post, go ahead and email me. I’ll add them to the list.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
If you enjoy this blog, remember it has its own Amazon Wishlist and appreciates your generosity. ;-)

Dennis Kennedy’s Links of the Week – February 17, 2008

Links of the Week is a regular feature on this blog where I list some of the most interesting links I’ve found during the previous week – sort of a “best of” from my Google Reader Shared Items. The idea is that I pick out a set of links that I might have wanted to write about or that I found especially thought-provoking or useful. I might or might not agree with the posts or items I link to, but I found them to be something I wanted to share.
In general, I’m just going to give a link to the item, without any explanation. I’ll try to do this every weekend, and I’ll include the latest additions to my 52 books in 52 weeks project.
This week’s links:
Law bloggers who link out the most carry the most influence
Learning More About Generation M
Knowing When to Ask for Help – Microsoft’s SharedView
Built for Speed: Part 1
Why WiMAX?
Why You Should Take a Look at the Free / Open Source Software Movement
100 Ways to Use Your iPod to Learn and Study Better
The Results are In (Microsoft Word)
JONNY’S LEGAL ADVISERS HEREBY INFORM YOU OF JONNY’S WISH THAT YOU ENJOY A HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY
Friday Flashback: KM 0.0 — A Pragmatic Approach to Social Networking and Knowledge Management for Business
Sites of the Week: Sites for Mac Lawyers

Wikis vs. Knowledge Management

What Diversity Looks Like Today
Top 10 iTunes Smart Playlists
50 Tricks to Get Things Done Faster, Better, and More Easily
Deep or Wide? You Decide
Don’t Cut IT During a Downturn
SaaS is the Future
2008 Corporate Legal Technology Trends @ InsideCounsel
This Week’s Additions to 52 Books in 52 Weeks:
The Shell Game, by Steve Alten

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Read the blog posts and RSS feed items I find most interesting on Google Reader Shared Items or subscribe to its RSS feed. High volume, but lots of interesting items that will get you thinking.
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