Technology-Lawyer

Dennis Kennedy

Technology Law and Legal Technology. Dennis Kennedy is one of the few technology lawyers who is also an expert on the underlying technologies. Dennis an award-winning leader in the application of technology and the Internet to the practice of law. DennisKennedy.com gives you access to a wide variety of Dennis Kennedy's resources on legal technology, his writings, his well-known blog, DennisKennedy.Blog, and information about how you can have Dennis speak to your organization or group.

Dennis Kennedy is one of the most knowledgeable legal technologists you will find. - Michael Arkfeld.

Dennis Kennedy, a lawyer and legal technology expert in St. Louis, Mo., has been a significant influence in the ever-evolving relationship between lawyers and the Web. - Robert Ambrogi

Archive for February, 2009

Recent Microblog Posts – February 25, 2009

Wednesday, February 25th, 2009

DennisKennedy.Microblog is a supplement to this blog that can be found on Twitter at @dkennedyblog. I invite you to become a follower. An explanation of the microblog can be found here.
Here are posts from the microblog for the last week or so to give you a flavor of what expect:

Frederic Lardinois has stats on search engine inquiries getting longer – http://bit.ly/Yctyn – do you notice Google giving poorer results?
Adam Thierer on just how far the Internet has come since 1996 – http://bit.ly/NKQZ3 – makes me feel a little nostalgic
Ed Yourdon’s updated presentation on using Twitter in the enterprise – http://bit.ly/XTX1I
Eric Mack on using Twitter as a tool for personal knowledge management – http://bit.ly/1av4SV
Larry (@rocketmatter) Port explains cloud computing to lawyers – http://bit.ly/kLqID – a couple of quotes from me.
Tamar Weinberg on how to present while people are twittering – http://bit.ly/rDgsl – essential skills for today’s presentations [Note: actual post by Olivia Mitchell]
Rob Paterson on a transformational plan for public radio and television – http://bit.ly/15slE7 – Do these ideas apply in other settings?
How are things made? Evolving Excellence’s Factory Tour of the Week will show you – http://bit.ly/A76w6 Fascinating.
Doug Cornelius on ways webinars fail – http://bit.ly/jCTQb
A brand new way for lawyers to analyze contracts and other documents? http://bit.ly/sKS2E I’ve used on articles, but an interesting idea [Note: I got some questions about what I meant by this. My idea would be to use a tag cloud for a document to get a quick overview of key points and concepts in a document.]
More details on my #TECHSHOW presentations – http://bit.ly/lv55T #collaboration
Dave Taylor explains Twitter hashtags – http://bit.ly/S4YRh – try #collaboration, #techshow and #gas at http://search.twitter.com
The FASTforward Blog Guide to Twitter – http://bit.ly/j8IOJ
Want to understand cloud computing? Great explanation at http://bit.ly/TBTIN

Let me know what you think about the microblog idea.
Also, Tom and I have started to do some regular posting at the Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration blog. I invite you to check it out and add it to your RSS reader.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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By Request: Any Open Source Apps to Create Legal Pleadings and Documents?

Sunday, February 22nd, 2009

As part of blawgiversary week at DennisKennedy.Blog, I’ve invited readers to send me their questions and I’ll try to answer each of them with a “By Request” post.
Not surprisingly, real life has intruded on my plan, so I’m running behind. However, keep sending your questions in and I’ll see how many I can answer this week.
Here’s the next question:
By Request: Any Open Source apps I can use on Ubuntu to create legal pleadings and documents?”
As longtime readers know, I’m a big fan of Open Source applications and the whole Open Source concept. However, I don’t use any flavor of Linux, Ubuntu or otherwise, so I don’t have an answer based on my own experience., although I have two suggestions for you.
If you are looking for Open Source software, I generally suggest checking Sourceforge to see what specific applications might be available. In this case, however, I’d suggest starting with something much simpler – Open Office. OpenOffice is an Open Source competitor to Microsoft Office. It’s available in a Linux version. I’d check into its capabilities and see if can do what you want it to do. Check some of the OpenOffice resources and forums to see if there are other suggestions. I just did a quick search and found some interesting comments on the topic here.
I’m also thinking that your question also shows some of the reasons Software as a Service (SaaS), or hosted applications, has become such an intriguing alternative. In SaaS, you are able to access the functionality of full-featured applications over the web using only a browser. On Ubuntu, you’d need only run a browser (such as Firefox) and find a hosted service that provides the functionality you need. For example, if you wanted to use document assembly to automate your forms and document creation, you could sign up for a doc assembly service like that from Exari and you be able to do what you want to do in a platform-independent environment.
Those would be my best two ideas. I invite readers to leave comments with other thoughts and recommendations.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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By Request: What Will It Take to Get Howard onto Facebook?

Thursday, February 19th, 2009

As part of blawgiversary week at DennisKennedy.Blog, I’ve invited readers to send me their questions and I’ll try to answer each of them with a “By Request” post.

Not surprisingly, real life has intruded on my plan, so I’m running behind. However, keep sending your questions in and I’ll see how many I can answer this weekend.
Here’s the next question:
“What Will It Take to Get Howard onto Facebook?”
OK. One of the risks in doing “By Request” is that people will ask questions that are too “insider” or don’t have application to my general audience. That said, I’ll still take a stab at this one.
Although on the surface, this might seem to be a question about one of my high school classmates, there are really two different, and increasingly important, questions hidden within this question, and I’ll answer those.
The two questions are: 1. How do you convince an adult, professional person (let’s say a lawyer) that it actually makes any sense at all to sign up for Facebook? And 2. Has it become obligatory for all of us to have an active Facebook account as part of our Internet presence?
Let’s take the second question first.
I’ve been on Facebook for a while. I did so as an experiment at the time bloggers and others first looked to Facebook as a possible platform for business networking. It’s still an experiment for me, and I have mixed conclusions about it. In fact, Tom Mighell and I did a podcast about a year-and-a-half ago about the ways lawyers might use Facebook. I’m not sure that my opinions in that podcast have changed in many meaningful ways since then.
My biggest difficulty with Facebook is that it is an additional silo for me – one more destination that isn’t among the first tier of Internet places I frequent. So, I’m not actually “on Facebook” that much, especially since I have an RSS feed for friends updates on Facebook.
That said, I’m gradually reaching the conclusion that having a Facebook page has become almost like having an email address. It’s one of the basic building blocks of an Internet presence, and it’s striking how often now I hear adults talking about having a Facebook page. The “killer app,” if you will, is using Facebook to reconnect with high schools, college and childhood friends.
The key word to keep in mind with a Facebook account is judgment, judgment and judgment, especially if you expect to have colleagues, clients or potential clients with any kind of access to your Facebook presence. Equally important is trying to make sure that your Facebook friends are friends who exercise good judgment as well, especially about you. In simplest terms, there are privacy settings on Facebook and you need to know what they are and how to use them.
Let me say it again: use good judgment.
Question #2. How do you convince someone who is reluctant or dubious that they need to be on Facebook?
I personally think that you can’t, but you can point to the path that will help someone make their own decisions.
In many ways, Facebook reminds me of the earliest days of Internet email in law firms. As I’ve said in several of my presentations, it wasn’t clients that led lawyers to use email; it was the children of law firm partners in college who wanted to communicate with them that moved lawyers to use Internet email. I see a similar pattern with parents today.
I probably cannot convince anyone of overwhelming benefits or “need” to get on Facebook, but I can point them to the ability to connect or reconnect with family, friends, high school classmates, fellow bloogers, legal technology experts, and the like. If there is a sufficient “hook,” people will try Facebook.
There are a lot of issues lawyers who use Facebook need to think through carefully (and I’m planning to write about that in the near future), but, in general, it will be the ability to connect personally with an important group of people that will motivate people to try Facebook.
Finally, what about the Howard question? What will it take?
I thought we were going to get him quite a while ago. When Mike got on Facebook, I thought we had him. When both Eric and Elaine were on, I thought we had him. When Howard IMed me that he was actually working on setting up an account, I almost believed him. I recently thought that Roger would be the tipping point. I doubt that this blog post will get him over the hump, but I’m an optimist. And I know that one day soon, we’ll see him and maybe even you on Facebook.
But remember the word “judgment” if you go there.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

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By Request: Are You Aware of Any SharePoint Training Programs for Lawyers?

Thursday, February 19th, 2009

As part of blawgiversary week at DennisKennedy.Blog, I’ve invited readers to send me their questions and I’ll try to answer each of them with a “By Request” post.

Not surprisingly, real life has intruded on my plan, so I’m running behind. However, keep sending your questions in and I’ll see how many I can answer this weekend.
Here’s the next question:
“Are you aware of any tailor-made programs being offered as CLE programs, or simply in-house training presentations for Sharepoint use in-house or in the small/large (legal) office setting?”
My short answer is “no,” but I did some checking into this question.
When it comes to SharePoint questions, my “go to” person is my friend Randy Holloway at Microsoft, who, among other things, has written a book on SharePoint, SharePoint 2007 and Office Development Expert Solutions (Programmer to Programmer).
Randy pointed me to Microsoft’s online training for SharePoint Server 2007 as a good place to start. It has a set of 21 twenty to thirty minute sessions on a variety of topics.
For legal-specific SharePoint seminars, I’d consider attending the annual ILTA conference or seeing what local or regional ILTA programs might be scheduled on the topic of SharePoint.
I’m curious about whether readers have other suggestions for SharePoint seminars, online or live, or other ways to learn about SharePoint for law firms and legal departments. If you have suggestions, leave a comment.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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By Request: Can You Give Us More Details on Your Presentations at TECHSHOW?

Monday, February 16th, 2009

As part of blawgiversary week at DennisKennedy.Blog, I’ve invited readers to send me their questions and I’ll try to answer each of them with a “By Request” post.
Today’s question was: “Can you give us more details on your presentations at TECHSHOW?”
While I like the new design of the ABA TECHSHOW 2009 site, I haven’t found a way to see in one place a list of presentations by speaker with descriptions of the sessions, so I’m sympathetic to this question.
I’ll be co-presenting at three sessions on Friday, April 3. All are about collaboration tools and technologies.
1. Building Bridges: Collaboration Tools Corporate Clients Will Love, with Joel Alleyne. (10:30 – 11:30)
Here’s the official description:

There is no room for inefficiency or insecurity during information exchange between client and law firm. Save your clients money and provide a unique experience by mastering the wealth of collaboration tools available to work with clients, co-counsel, and even opposing counsel. Extranets, webinars, SharePoint, online project management, online video conferencing and many more tools provide alternatives to voice and email communication. Come learn about the different options, both synchronous and asynchronous, to share information and collaborate on work product with these effective new technologies.

In this session, I’m expecting to focus on client-focused collaboration tools and strategies, with an emphasis on some fresh approaches to one of my longtime favorite themes – client-driven technologies.
2. Smart Ways to Work Together: Collaboration Tools and Technologies for Lawyers, with Tom Mighell. (12:30 – 1:30)
Here’s the official description:

Cut out the phone tag and down time while getting more work done with your colleagues. Learn what new or ripening technologies are available, how to select the right tool for the job, and practical tips for using collaboration tools in common settings, including ethical issues and other considerations. Shared calendars and documents, meeting managers, IM, wikis, video conferencing – it’s all waiting to boost your productivity, and much of it is FREE!

This presentation will, of course, be based on our book, but Tom and I have decided to take a modified “60 Collaboration Tips in 60 Minutes” approach to this session to maximize the amount of practical information we deliver and to provide useful info to all attendees regardless of their levels of experience or expertise with collaboration tools.
3. Collaboration Tools for Lawyers, with Tom Mighell (2:30 – 3:30)
Here’s the official description:

The authors of Collaboration Tools & Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together will lead this roundtable discussion, which will cover all the many technologies, both general and legal-specific, that lawyers can use to work together more effectively. Come hear what works for others, and share what has worked for you.

In this session, Tom and I want to focus on what the audience wants to learn. We are planning to use an “unconference” approach (probably some modified Open Space and LexThink techniques) to make the session as interactive as possible and to help share the experience and expertise of everyone in the room. It was great to see Bob Ambrogi’s blog post today with his very favorable response to his recent experience with “unconference” approaches. Here are some of my thoughts on unconferences.
In addition to the presentations, I expect to put in some volunteer time as a “conference concierge” at the entrance station, and expect that Tom and I will co-host one of the dinner outings.
If you still haven’t made a decision about attending TECHSHOW this year, now is the time to make up your mind. There’s a $200 early bird discount available until the end of February. If you join the ABA’s Law Practice Management Section (and you should if you read this blog and are an ABA member), you will be eligible for a discount as well. If someone else from your organization is also wanting to go, multiple attendee pricing is also available. Lots of good deals for a great legal technology conference. Hope to see you there.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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It’s Blawgiversary/Birthday Week at DennisKennedy.Blog!

Sunday, February 15th, 2009

On February 15, 2003, I launched this blog with the following post:

And so it begins . . .
I realized the other day that I had first written about blogs well over a year ago. In fact, the rise of blogs was one of my 2002 predictions for legal technology in my annual legal tech predictions article. As I was working on updating my web site (http://www.denniskennedy.com), I finally decided that I had to have my own blog. Thanks to people like Jerry Lawson, Sabrina Pacifici, the Support Forum at MovableType.org, it’s finally here.

The blog was my early birthday present to myself in 2003. I’m sure that many readers will appreciate the Babylon 5 allusion in the title.
One of the annual traditions on this blog is to have a combined blawgiversary (or blogiversary) and birthday (February 17) celebration. I’ve had a lot of fun with this over the years, and done more than a few silly things as part of these celebrations.
However, at heart, blawgiversary/birthday week is a reader appreciation week and a way to say thank you to all the readers of this blog, some of whom have been with me all the years. To all readers, long-time, short-time or first-time, a big thank you for reading this blogger and giving me plenty of reasons to keep this blog rolling year after year.
As usual, I have some treats for readers this week. This year, I’ll give one gift and a couple of treats. There might be more surprises as the week goes on, so stay tuned.
First, I’m turning this week into a “By Request” week. Use the comments, email (denniskennedyblog @ gmail . com) or even Twitter (@dkennedyblog or @denniskennedy) to ask me any question you’d like that would be of general interest, and I’ll try to answer as many of those questions as I can this week. Of course, I reserve the right to duck difficult questions or to answer an easier question than the question you ask.
Two treats:
First, Tom Mighell and I have recorded a podcast about collaboration tools and technologies that you may download and listen to for free. The details on the podcast and how to download it are here.
Second, it wouldn’t be a blawgiversary here without me continuing my tradition of claiming that I’ve arranged a “special deal for readers” to say that something that was already happening today was actually done as a part of this blawgiversary. Tempting as it was, I’ve resisted saying that I worked out a deal for both the Daytona 500 and the NBA All-Star game to be scheduled this year on my blawgiversary day. Instead, I’ll offer up a special $200 discount for early registrants to ABA TECHSHOW 2009 through the end of the month.
Again, a big thank you to all my readers. I’m looking forward to another great year at DennisKennedy.Blog and to answering your questions.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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Recent Microblog Posts – February 15, 2009

Sunday, February 15th, 2009

DennisKennedy.Microblog is a supplement to this blog that can be found on Twitter at @dkennedyblog. I invite you to become a follower. An explanation of the microblog can be found here.
Here are posts from the microblog for the last week or so to give you a flavor of what expect:

Want to understand cloud computing? Great explanation at http://bit.ly/TBTIN
New post on DennisKennedy.Blog: “Using #Collaboration Tools in the Real World” – http://bit.ly/Ud3Zh
Bruce Marcus on “surviving in the current cascade of economic disaster – http://bit.ly/1aFhgV – the end of business as usual?
Kevin Kelly’s fascinating piece on Amish hackers and early adopters – http://bit.ly/Tr3l. In a similar vein – http://bit.ly/CgJVN
Based on the books I’ve read on the list, this list of 100 best business books is excellent – http://bit.ly/38F7sQ
This strikes me as a must-think-about post w/ bigger implications: Matt Ingram on “The NYT API: Newspaper as Platform” – http://bit.ly/dVEg
Gary Goldhammer reminds us “technology can’t help you if you have nothing to say” in useful tips about social media – http://bit.ly/42ftJI
Michelle Golden offers sage advice on operating and growing in a down economy – http://bit.ly/4izk0B
Ron Friedmann asks “Legal Tech New York 2009: Is EDD the New DOS?” – http://bit.ly/21tGb1 My early EDD 2.0 ideas – http://bit.ly/3de2 #ltny
Nick Carr talks about cloud computing and the Big Switch – http://bit.ly/p8Bo – podcast is a great intro to cloud computing concepts
Hildebrandt and Citi Private Bank 2009 Client Advisory on Trends in Legal Market – http://www.bespacific.com/mt/archives/020482.html

Let me know what you think about the microblog idea.
Also, Tom and I have started to do some regular posting at the Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration blog. I invite you to check it out and add it to your RSS reader.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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Congratulations to Julie Broyles – St. Louis 40 Under 40

Thursday, February 12th, 2009

For the second time in last four years, I’ve found myself at St. Louis Business Journal’s 40 Under 40 awards dinner celebrating a friend being named to the list. In 2005, it was Kevin Buckley and tonight it was my colleague in MasterCard’s law department, Julie Broyles.
What I’ve found is that I really enjoy seeing people I know getting well-deserved recognition.
A big attraction for me to join the law department at MasterCard was getting the chance to work with the excellent team we have in the St. Louis office, so it was great to see Julie get the recognition and us all to get the chance to share in her big moment on a big stage.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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Using Collaboration Tools in the Real World

Wednesday, February 11th, 2009

I wrote a post on LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com the other day called “Eating Our Own Collaboration Tools Dog Food.” For those unfamiliar with the reference, “eating one’s own dog food” is a term, often associated with Microsoft, that refers to a company that actually uses its own products.
The reference in my post was to an example of Tom Mighell and I actually using some of the collaboration tools we wrote about in our book to actually, well, collaborate on a project we were working on. I recommend the post because it walks through some of the basic tools we used and how and why we used them.
I noted five takeaways from our experience:

1. We actually use the collaboration tools we write and talk about.
2. We like having a tool box of collaboration tools for different purposes rather than being concerned with a single all-purpose collaboration tool.
3. Different tools work well for different purposes.
4. Even in the same project you might use a number of different tools to do the same types of thins.
5. We really like the way you can open a constant communications channel to help you work by using instant messaging.

I’ve gotten some email about the post. I was struck by how people recommended another all-in-one tool that we could have used (for example, Acrobat.com) instead of the variety of common tools we actually used.
The emailers are exactly right – we could have done that. And it would have worked well for us, although we are creatures of habit and tend to use the tools we are most familiar and comfortable with..
The most interesting thing about collaboration tools is that there are many ways to get to the same place. The more versatility and flexibility you can have with these tools, the more collaboration options you’ll have and you’ll be able to find a good way to work with whomever you happen to be working with.
I appreciate all the comments, and invite others as well, once you read the post.
As I look back on the post, I also want to highlight the “takeaway” that instant messaging really can play a key role in collaboration efforts. Tom and I have written an article about this topic that should be appearing soon in the ABA’s Law Practice magazine.
This seems like a good time to mention that Tom and I will be speaking on collaboration tools at the ABA TECHSHOW in April, including a roundtable session in which we plan to use some “unconference” techniques. Hope to see you there. You can get quick updates on collaboration tools and our upcoming sessions via Twitter by following @collabtools.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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Recent Microblog Posts – February 3, 2009

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009

DennisKennedy.Microblog is a supplement to this blog that can be found on Twitter at @dkennedyblog. I invite you to become a follower. An explanation of the microblog can be found here.
Here are posts from the microblog for the last week or so:

Hildebrandt and Citi Private Bank 2009 Client Advisory on Trends in Legal Market – http://www.bespacific.com/mt/archives/020482.html
Susan Cram on not using smart technologies to do dumb things – http://bit.ly/4H37 – “hire motivated people and don’t de-motivate them”
Jordan Furlong (@jordan_law21) sketches out what the recession will bring for the legal profession, including unbundled services – http://tinyurl.com/aqmzvp
Rajesh Setty sums up the business case for giving away your best work for FREE! – http://bit.ly/ko7I
10 Privacy Settings Every Facebook User Should Know – http://bit.ly/16QFbp (Hat tip to Colette Vogele for the link)
Venkat Balasubramani: “Should Lawyers Worry About Confidentiality in Instant Messages?” http://bit.ly/pCy2 There are other worries, too.
More great speaking tips from Bert Decker: Six Don’ts for the End of Your Presentations – http://bit.ly/brXeR
Nicholas Carlson writes “Printing The NYT Costs Twice As Much As Sending Every Subscriber A Free Kindle.” http://bit.ly/tc0k Paradigm shift?
Recession Stat: More Google Searches for “coupons” than for “Britney Spears” – http://bit.ly/f7uM
My new blog post on using client technology surveys – http://bit.ly/mbzV
The law 2.0 revolution starts now? Mylawyer.co.uk (http://bit.ly/pvt3) Must-listen podcast here with details – http://bit.ly/Gh9N (877.mp3)
Surinder Kahai on the evolution of harmful email habits – http://bit.ly/15bxy – sometimes email may not be the best choice for communication
“Will Law Firm Technology Budgets Be Decimated in 2009? Discuss.” – http://bit.ly/plKG
Ron Baker on recession-proofing your firm, with action steps – http://bit.ly/2XaZUz
The Fully Connected Law Firm – http://bit.ly/10Cqy I wrote this several years ago, but it still seemed fresh to me today.

Let me know what you think about the microblog idea.
Also, Tom and I have started to do some regular posting at the Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration blog. I invite you to check it out and add it to your RSS reader.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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