Recent Microblog Posts – July 27, 2009

DennisKennedy.Microblog is a supplement to this blog that can be found on Twitter at @dkennedyblog. I invite you to become a follower. An explanation of the microblog can be found here.
Here are recent posts from the microblog. As an aside, it’s intriguing to me that any one or all of these would have turned into a blog post with some discussion of the topic several years ago.

Om Malik on “The Social Web Prays at Email’s Altar” – http://bit.ly/s2v0G – ways to fix email?
Here’s a great podcast – Hanselminutes Podcast 172 – Dan Bricklin on Technology – http://bit.ly/KDglD
RT @TomMighell: Introducing the Tom Mighell Linkstream (http://linkstream.inter-alia.net). For more info: http://bit.ly/1aWeDs
New blog post – Working in the Cloud – Lawyers and SaaS – http://bit.ly/o4WPM
Alex Payne on the future of feed readers – http://bit.ly/15UJYN
John Robb on Space – http://bit.ly/18pXUx – outward vs. inward direction
E-discovery guru Mary Mack has free new ebook for you to download – http://bit.ly/Cuvr9 – it’s called A Process of Illumination
The NPR Open API – http://bit.ly/1zuhHo and http://bit.ly/uTZyk – very cool stuff
Great post telling the story of one of my all-time favorite albums – Peter Gabriel’s Passion – http://bit.ly/7S3El
Email Etiquette 2.0 – the newest episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast – http://bit.ly/17PqnA (and on iTunes)
New blog post: “A Crowdsourcing Experiment: Help Me with Topics for Upcoming ABA Journal Columns” http://bit.ly/DRolD
Looking for topic suggestions for future ABA Journal tech columns: include @denniskennedy or @dkennedyblog in your tweet w/idea or email me
RT @LegalTalk: Tomorrow on The Kennedy-Mighell Report: “Email Etiquette 2.0″ http://bit.ly/3snriS
New blog post: Speaking on Social Media Panel & a Few Thoughts on Transparency – http://bit.ly/18UGyZ
It’s GTD Legal Week at Rocket Matter – http://bit.ly/s0TKP – I’m focused on it too as I mentioned on our last podcast – http://bit.ly/pclVV
Dave Winer “Rebooting the RSS Cloud” – instantaneous RSS – http://rsscloud.org/ – definitely a space to watch
Dave Winer succinctly summarizes the fundamental publishing / conversation dichotomy in blogging and Twitter – http://bit.ly/BIeBd
Paul Lippe: Welcome to the Future: Revolutions & Other Models of Change – http://bit.ly/iXQBc - recognizing inflection pts in law practice
What technology has been declared dead today? A new episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast: http://bit.ly/pclVV
Heather Milligan: Known, Liked and Trusted 2.0 – http://bit.ly/JbGdb – great point; recall discussion on similar topic at 1st LexThink conf.
Ron Friedman offers some theories on why the “most profitable law firms” don’t blog – http://bit.ly/bUw0N

Check out the new The Kennedy-Mighell Report Podcast on the Legal Talk Network.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Technorati tags:

Working in the Cloud – Lawyers and SaaS

My latest technology column for the ABA Journal is out. It’s called “Working in the Cloud” and it focuses on the area now known as Software as a Service (SaaS) or hosted services or cloud computing. In fact, it’s my effort to make the concept of cloud computing accessible and understandable to the average lawyer. It’s probably well-known than I’ve long been a fan of the SaaS approach, but this column is intended to provide a balanced discussion of the concept.
After sketching out some history, I cover the general benefits and concerns about the SaaS approach and give some suggested tips when considering this approach:
1. Ask “compared to what?”
2. Do your due dil­igence.
3. Know your SLAs.
4. Deal with confidentiality.
5. Plan for transition,
6. Start small.

The details about the tips are in the article, of course, which you should now check out here.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Listen to The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal Talk Network.
Technorati tags:

Email Etiquette 2.0

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes. The episode is called “Email Etiquette 2.0” and here’s the description:

As the way we use and respond to email has evolved, has traditional email “etiquette” changed too? On this edition of the Kennedy-Mighell Report, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell take a look at the “Email Golden Rule” and come up with some new guidelines to improve your email experience, and the experience of anyone who receives a message from you. In the Q & A segment, Dennis and Tom will answer audience questions and wrap up with Parting Shots, leaving you with lasting tips and observations.

In the episode, Tom and I talk about whether the evolution of email and our use of email has led to changes in what is accepted and advisable email etiquette. You can take a look at my early article “Ten Habits of Highly Effective Emailers” for good list of standard email etiquette. It’s interesting to see how much of the article is still valid and how times have changed.
My premise is that email etiquette needs to involve and, to an extent, is evolving toward a more dynamic, recipient-focused approach with you as sender taking a more active role in the email recipient’s email experience. The podcast expands on that point.
A few of the email etiquette points we mention:

Email is just one communication channel – choose email for what’s right for email channel
Think about where and on what device your recipient will receive the email.
You really want to be smart about using subject lines
- No reply necessary and EOM subject lines
If you will be delayed in a response, let people know – it’s OK. Is the best reply sometimes no reply
Be careful with attachments
Why are you cc’ing people?
Use bullet points and formatting to get your main points across to people who only scan emails
BlackBerry/iPhone etiquette (possibly a topic for a whole podcast)
Don’t subscribe me to your email newsletter just because I followed you on Twitter, added you as a connection on LinkedIn or gave you my business card.

Our last point was an attempt to summarize the new email etiquette with something we informally called the “Email Golden Rule.” It says: Email to others as you would have them email to you.” That’s my guiding principle for email etiquette 2.0.
There’s a good chance that Tom and I will turn the content of this podcast into an article in the near future.
We also take on a question from our audience on whether the “walled garden” approach to legal publications will continue or whether we’ll see a move toward more open, free and ungated law-related content from legal publishers. Remember, you can contact me anytime with a question that might use for this segment of our podcast.
In my “parting shot” (useful tip), I mention how much I like the Secunia Personal Software Inspector as a way to make sure that you have applied all of the latest security patches and updates for the software you use.
Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think.
A special thanks to our ace production team at the Legal Talk Network who were able to work around technical glitches from Tom and me (mine was the more serious one).
And try some of the back episodes as well.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Technorati tags:

A Crowdsourcing Experiment: Help Me with Topics for Upcoming ABA Journal Columns

I find it much easier to write columns than it is to come up with topics for columns. My usual trick is to brainstorm a bunch of topics and then put together a calendar of topics for several months in advance.
It’s that time again for my technology column in the ABA Journal (latest column here).
However, this time I’d like to try an experiment in “crowdsourcing.”
I’m inviting you, as a reader of this blog post, to join in an experiment in helping me put together a list of future topics.
The idea of the column is to cover technology topics of general interest to the practicing lawyer. Topics should not be too specific or too tied to a single product. I don’t write reviews.
Here’s an example. The last column I wrote (which is not yet published) talks about ways lawyers can avoid sending huge attachments by email. More than likely, my next column will be a look at “next-generation search” and alternatives lawyers might consider to Google.
If you’d like to participate (and part of this experiment is simply to see if anyone will), you can do so in several different ways:
1. Post a comment to this post with your suggested topic(s).
2. Email your suggested topic(s) to me at denniskennedyblog @ gmail . com.
3. Tweet your suggested topic on Twitter and include either @dkennedyblog or @denniskennedy in the text of the tweet.
Thanks for your help.
I also have another “crowdsourcing” opportunity. Tom Mighell and I have a segment in our podcast, The Kennedy-Mighell Report on the Legal Talk Network, in which we answer questions about legal technology submitted by our audience, You can also use the methods above to send me questions that we might use in that segment of future episodes.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Listen to The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal Talk Network.
Technorati tags:

“Lean Legal Technology” – Making Lemons out of Lemonade

Let me add my “me too” to the many accolades for the new issue of the Law Practice Today webzine with its focus on tips for “suddenly solo” lawyers. “Suddenly solo” is a phrase that refers to lawyers (increasingly these days long-time law firm partners) who find, often with little warning, that their law firm no longer needs or wants their services. In today’s economy, these lawyers frequently find that rather than moving to another law firm and a comparable position, their only option is to start up their own solo practice.
The issue has many useful articles and I expect it to receive many pointers as the “go to” resource on the topic.
The article includes a new article from me called “Lemons, Lemonade and Lean Legal Technology – A Shoestring Approach to Legal Technology for the Suddenly Solo Lawyer.” My friend Wendy Werner, who is doing a great job as editor-in-chief of Law Practice Today, called me one day and ignored my protests that I had no time to write an article for this issue and planted the seed for a topic that intrigued me.
The idea behind the article is to try to scope out how little a lawyers who finds himself or herself suddenly solo might actually need (as opposed to want) in order to get a new practice off the ground.
I offer a list of twelve steps to consider:
1. Take a Deep Breath. Really.
2. Take an Inventory of What You Already Have.
3. Go on a Treasure Hunt.
4. Identify Your Software.
5. Take a Hard Look at What You Really Need to Do Your Work and Manage Your Practice.
6. Match What You Have to What You Need.
7. Make Lemonade Out of Lemons.
8. Free is Good, Especially for Software.
9. Turning Technology into a Utility Cost.
10. Find Internet Bargains.
11. Develop Your Internet Presence.
12. Think About Technology Selection as a Process.
Interestingly, when I thought of using the term “lean legal technology,” I did a quick search on Google to see how the term might have been used before. Apparently, it hadn’t been used before, at least accrding to Google, so maybe I coined a term as part of the article.
Anyway, the articles represents a fresh approach to some of these legal tech topics and I hope the article is helpful to some lawyers trying to make it through a tough period.
Read the article and let me know what you think.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Listen to The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal Talk Network
Technorati tags: