Technology-Lawyer

Dennis Kennedy

Technology Law and Legal Technology. Dennis Kennedy is one of the few technology lawyers who is also an expert on the underlying technologies. Dennis an award-winning leader in the application of technology and the Internet to the practice of law. DennisKennedy.com gives you access to a wide variety of Dennis Kennedy's resources on legal technology, his writings, his well-known blog, DennisKennedy.Blog, and information about how you can have Dennis speak to your organization or group.

Dennis Kennedy is one of the most knowledgeable legal technologists you will find. - Michael Arkfeld.

Dennis Kennedy, a lawyer and legal technology expert in St. Louis, Mo., has been a significant influence in the ever-evolving relationship between lawyers and the Web. - Robert Ambrogi

Archive for July, 2009

Recent Microblog Posts – July 27, 2009

Monday, July 27th, 2009

DennisKennedy.Microblog is a supplement to this blog that can be found on Twitter at @dkennedyblog. I invite you to become a follower. An explanation of the microblog can be found here.
Here are recent posts from the microblog. As an aside, it’s intriguing to me that any one or all of these would have turned into a blog post with some discussion of the topic several years ago.

Om Malik on “The Social Web Prays at Email’s Altar” – http://bit.ly/s2v0G – ways to fix email?
Here’s a great podcast – Hanselminutes Podcast 172 – Dan Bricklin on Technology – http://bit.ly/KDglD
RT @TomMighell: Introducing the Tom Mighell Linkstream (http://linkstream.inter-alia.net). For more info: http://bit.ly/1aWeDs
New blog post – Working in the Cloud – Lawyers and SaaS – http://bit.ly/o4WPM
Alex Payne on the future of feed readers – http://bit.ly/15UJYN
John Robb on Space – http://bit.ly/18pXUx – outward vs. inward direction
E-discovery guru Mary Mack has free new ebook for you to download – http://bit.ly/Cuvr9 – it’s called A Process of Illumination
The NPR Open API – http://bit.ly/1zuhHo and http://bit.ly/uTZyk – very cool stuff
Great post telling the story of one of my all-time favorite albums – Peter Gabriel’s Passion – http://bit.ly/7S3El
Email Etiquette 2.0 – the newest episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast – http://bit.ly/17PqnA (and on iTunes)
New blog post: “A Crowdsourcing Experiment: Help Me with Topics for Upcoming ABA Journal Columns” http://bit.ly/DRolD
Looking for topic suggestions for future ABA Journal tech columns: include @denniskennedy or @dkennedyblog in your tweet w/idea or email me
RT @LegalTalk: Tomorrow on The Kennedy-Mighell Report: “Email Etiquette 2.0″ http://bit.ly/3snriS
New blog post: Speaking on Social Media Panel & a Few Thoughts on Transparency – http://bit.ly/18UGyZ
It’s GTD Legal Week at Rocket Matter – http://bit.ly/s0TKP – I’m focused on it too as I mentioned on our last podcast – http://bit.ly/pclVV
Dave Winer “Rebooting the RSS Cloud” – instantaneous RSS – http://rsscloud.org/ – definitely a space to watch
Dave Winer succinctly summarizes the fundamental publishing / conversation dichotomy in blogging and Twitter – http://bit.ly/BIeBd
Paul Lippe: Welcome to the Future: Revolutions & Other Models of Change – http://bit.ly/iXQBc - recognizing inflection pts in law practice
What technology has been declared dead today? A new episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast: http://bit.ly/pclVV
Heather Milligan: Known, Liked and Trusted 2.0 – http://bit.ly/JbGdb – great point; recall discussion on similar topic at 1st LexThink conf.
Ron Friedman offers some theories on why the “most profitable law firms” don’t blog – http://bit.ly/bUw0N

Check out the new The Kennedy-Mighell Report Podcast on the Legal Talk Network.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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Working in the Cloud – Lawyers and SaaS

Sunday, July 26th, 2009

My latest technology column for the ABA Journal is out. It’s called “Working in the Cloud” and it focuses on the area now known as Software as a Service (SaaS) or hosted services or cloud computing. In fact, it’s my effort to make the concept of cloud computing accessible and understandable to the average lawyer. It’s probably well-known than I’ve long been a fan of the SaaS approach, but this column is intended to provide a balanced discussion of the concept.
After sketching out some history, I cover the general benefits and concerns about the SaaS approach and give some suggested tips when considering this approach:
1. Ask “compared to what?”
2. Do your due dil­igence.
3. Know your SLAs.
4. Deal with confidentiality.
5. Plan for transition,
6. Start small.

The details about the tips are in the article, of course, which you should now check out here.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Listen to The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal Talk Network.
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Email Etiquette 2.0

Tuesday, July 21st, 2009

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes. The episode is called “Email Etiquette 2.0” and here’s the description:

As the way we use and respond to email has evolved, has traditional email “etiquette” changed too? On this edition of the Kennedy-Mighell Report, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell take a look at the “Email Golden Rule” and come up with some new guidelines to improve your email experience, and the experience of anyone who receives a message from you. In the Q & A segment, Dennis and Tom will answer audience questions and wrap up with Parting Shots, leaving you with lasting tips and observations.

In the episode, Tom and I talk about whether the evolution of email and our use of email has led to changes in what is accepted and advisable email etiquette. You can take a look at my early article “Ten Habits of Highly Effective Emailers” for good list of standard email etiquette. It’s interesting to see how much of the article is still valid and how times have changed.
My premise is that email etiquette needs to involve and, to an extent, is evolving toward a more dynamic, recipient-focused approach with you as sender taking a more active role in the email recipient’s email experience. The podcast expands on that point.
A few of the email etiquette points we mention:

Email is just one communication channel – choose email for what’s right for email channel
Think about where and on what device your recipient will receive the email.
You really want to be smart about using subject lines
- No reply necessary and EOM subject lines
If you will be delayed in a response, let people know – it’s OK. Is the best reply sometimes no reply
Be careful with attachments
Why are you cc’ing people?
Use bullet points and formatting to get your main points across to people who only scan emails
BlackBerry/iPhone etiquette (possibly a topic for a whole podcast)
Don’t subscribe me to your email newsletter just because I followed you on Twitter, added you as a connection on LinkedIn or gave you my business card.

Our last point was an attempt to summarize the new email etiquette with something we informally called the “Email Golden Rule.” It says: Email to others as you would have them email to you.” That’s my guiding principle for email etiquette 2.0.
There’s a good chance that Tom and I will turn the content of this podcast into an article in the near future.
We also take on a question from our audience on whether the “walled garden” approach to legal publications will continue or whether we’ll see a move toward more open, free and ungated law-related content from legal publishers. Remember, you can contact me anytime with a question that might use for this segment of our podcast.
In my “parting shot” (useful tip), I mention how much I like the Secunia Personal Software Inspector as a way to make sure that you have applied all of the latest security patches and updates for the software you use.
Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think.
A special thanks to our ace production team at the Legal Talk Network who were able to work around technical glitches from Tom and me (mine was the more serious one).
And try some of the back episodes as well.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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A Crowdsourcing Experiment: Help Me with Topics for Upcoming ABA Journal Columns

Monday, July 20th, 2009

I find it much easier to write columns than it is to come up with topics for columns. My usual trick is to brainstorm a bunch of topics and then put together a calendar of topics for several months in advance.
It’s that time again for my technology column in the ABA Journal (latest column here).
However, this time I’d like to try an experiment in “crowdsourcing.”
I’m inviting you, as a reader of this blog post, to join in an experiment in helping me put together a list of future topics.
The idea of the column is to cover technology topics of general interest to the practicing lawyer. Topics should not be too specific or too tied to a single product. I don’t write reviews.
Here’s an example. The last column I wrote (which is not yet published) talks about ways lawyers can avoid sending huge attachments by email. More than likely, my next column will be a look at “next-generation search” and alternatives lawyers might consider to Google.
If you’d like to participate (and part of this experiment is simply to see if anyone will), you can do so in several different ways:
1. Post a comment to this post with your suggested topic(s).
2. Email your suggested topic(s) to me at denniskennedyblog @ gmail . com.
3. Tweet your suggested topic on Twitter and include either @dkennedyblog or @denniskennedy in the text of the tweet.
Thanks for your help.
I also have another “crowdsourcing” opportunity. Tom Mighell and I have a segment in our podcast, The Kennedy-Mighell Report on the Legal Talk Network, in which we answer questions about legal technology submitted by our audience, You can also use the methods above to send me questions that we might use in that segment of future episodes.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Listen to The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal Talk Network.
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“Lean Legal Technology” – Making Lemons out of Lemonade

Sunday, July 19th, 2009

Let me add my “me too” to the many accolades for the new issue of the Law Practice Today webzine with its focus on tips for “suddenly solo” lawyers. “Suddenly solo” is a phrase that refers to lawyers (increasingly these days long-time law firm partners) who find, often with little warning, that their law firm no longer needs or wants their services. In today’s economy, these lawyers frequently find that rather than moving to another law firm and a comparable position, their only option is to start up their own solo practice.
The issue has many useful articles and I expect it to receive many pointers as the “go to” resource on the topic.
The article includes a new article from me called “Lemons, Lemonade and Lean Legal Technology – A Shoestring Approach to Legal Technology for the Suddenly Solo Lawyer.” My friend Wendy Werner, who is doing a great job as editor-in-chief of Law Practice Today, called me one day and ignored my protests that I had no time to write an article for this issue and planted the seed for a topic that intrigued me.
The idea behind the article is to try to scope out how little a lawyers who finds himself or herself suddenly solo might actually need (as opposed to want) in order to get a new practice off the ground.
I offer a list of twelve steps to consider:
1. Take a Deep Breath. Really.
2. Take an Inventory of What You Already Have.
3. Go on a Treasure Hunt.
4. Identify Your Software.
5. Take a Hard Look at What You Really Need to Do Your Work and Manage Your Practice.
6. Match What You Have to What You Need.
7. Make Lemonade Out of Lemons.
8. Free is Good, Especially for Software.
9. Turning Technology into a Utility Cost.
10. Find Internet Bargains.
11. Develop Your Internet Presence.
12. Think About Technology Selection as a Process.
Interestingly, when I thought of using the term “lean legal technology,” I did a quick search on Google to see how the term might have been used before. Apparently, it hadn’t been used before, at least accrding to Google, so maybe I coined a term as part of the article.
Anyway, the articles represents a fresh approach to some of these legal tech topics and I hope the article is helpful to some lawyers trying to make it through a tough period.
Read the article and let me know what you think.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Listen to The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal Talk Network
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Speaking on Social Media Panel & a Few Thoughts on Transparency

Wednesday, July 15th, 2009

I’m looking forward to be one of the panelist on Thursday night (July 16) at the Social Media Club of St. Louis’s legal and ethics panel discussion and networking event. It’ll be held at Moulin Events, in the first floor Chouteau Room at 2017 Chouteau Ave, Saint Louis, MO 63103. Sign up for a spot here. It’d be great to meet some readers of this blog in person there.
It’s a stellar panel, moderated by Matt Homann. Other panelists include Rex (@rex7) Gradeless, Dana (@dloesch) Loesch and Eric Kayira. It’s meant to be educational and entertaining and give an introduction to some of the legal and ethical issues we are finding in the era of social media.
I know Matt is busily gathering questions and I’m not quite sure what to prepare for, but I’ll do my best.
As I prepare, I’ve been thinking about the basic notions of openness and transparency in the social media setting.
I had this idea for a simple three-step approach to openness and transparency that I’ll probably offer at the session and that I’ll try out here in advance.
Here’s the concept:
Three Basic Steps:
1. Capacity
2. Required or Recommended Disclosures
3. Practical Impact; Setting Expectations.

The Details.
1. Capacity.
First, identify who you are and in what capacity you are speaking. The will help address the work/personal issue. State clearly that you are speaking in your personal capacity and not in your work capactiy. Also, if you are speaking in your work capacity (after making sure you are permitted to do that), state clearly that you are speaking in that capacity. Clarify capacity in any other case where people might be confused (e.g, if someone thinks that you might be speaking on behalf of someone else). I always spell out that I am speaking in a personal capacity. Interestingly, I’ve given thought lately to spelling out that just because I write a column for the ABA Journal, I am not speaking on behalf of the American Bar Association. Surprisingly, there are occasionally people who seem to think that it’s an official statement of the organization (which it isn’t) rather than a personal opinion column (which it clearly is).
2. Required and Recommended Disclosures. I probably need to come up with a better word for the second category. The idea here is that you might have certain legally-required or otherwise mandated disclosures or disclaimers. Lawyers, for example, will clearly identify that they are not giving legal advice or post other required disclaimers. Others might have similar requirements or even legal requirements. There are often recommended disclosures of facts that your audience would want to know – whether you’ve been paid, received gifts or have financial or other interests or conflicts. This step requires some exercise of judgment and, at least in part, an exercise of putting yourself in the place of your audience to see what you, as an audience member, would want to know to help fairly evaluate what you are presenting.
3. Practical Impact; Setting Expectations. In one sense, this is optional, but, in another, it’s quite a valuable thing to do. Help your audience understand what the practical impact of steps 1 and 2. For example, if I state that I can’t give legal advice, then it’s helpful to tell your audience that you will speak very generally, not answer specific questions based on unique facts or even indicate that it might seem that you are ducking questions. You can also say that although you won’t give specific answers, you’ll try to sketch out the issues to consider and give a framework for addressing the type of question. Others might indicate that they can’t discuss “forward-looking” information or will avoid topics where they have a financial interest. That’s all part of setting realistic expectations and respect your audience.
If you handle these steps sequentially, you can establiish transparenct, set expectations and connect whith your audience quickly when speaking, blogging or doing your profile or making other introductions in social media. It can be quite simple: “I’m a lawyer at XYZ firm, but I’m speaking personally not on behalf of my firm. I’m here to educate, not to give legal advice. As a result, I’ll be teaching general concepts, approaches and ways to analyze legal issues rather than providing specific answers to specific questions. That said, let’s jump into the topic.”
Anyway, that’s the idea I’m toying with. I’d be interested in your reactions.,
Also, Tom Mighell and I will be recording a new episode of our podcast this week. If you have any questions of general interest about legal technology for our audience Q & A segment, let me know.
And, if you are in St. Louis on the 16th, stop on by the Social Media Club panel event and say hello. It’s a great panel and should be fun and educational.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Listen to The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal Talk Network.
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Using Technology Audits to Save Money in Law Firms

Monday, July 13th, 2009

My latest technology column for the ABA Journal is out. It’s called “Countdown to Savings” and it focuses on ways that law firms can use technology audits, from the simple to the complex, to get information that they can use to make good business decisions about technology.
The idea is that too often law firms make guesses about technology needs, Even a simple counting can give you a numerical / factual basis for making better technology decisions. As I commonly do, I wanted to focus on the business side of legal tech more so than on the purely technical side.
My sense for the value of tech audits stems in no small part from my own experience one day at a former law firm. Our one-person IT department left without warning and I spent the day with a consultant brought in on an emergency basis struggling to answer basic questions like: how many PCs on your network? what version of the network software do you use? how many users do you have?
It’s a lot easier when you have the numbers upon which to base your decisions. Here are two examples.
First, note how your decision-making changes when asked to approve a purchase of a new scanner when you know that you have two aging scanners versus learning that you have six of them scattered around your office. Your decision might move from whether to purchase to whether to move locations and better deploy to match workflow.
Second, note how your decision on who gets to use a software program for which you have 50 licenses changes when you know that you have 24 users as compared to 48 users.
I like the way tech audits can be used to gather “actionable intelligence” to help you make real-world decisions. The column sets out the wide range of technology audits you can use – from the simplest (running a free tool to find out the hardware and software on your computer or walking around and counting PCs) to the most complex (sophisticated network audits or security audits run by outside experts).
The decisions that I think tech audits can really help you make are those that save you money. And that’s a good thing these days.
The response to this column surprised me. I had a larger than usual number of emails, all quite positive. Yet, if you visit the article (and I hope you will), you’ll see a couple of quite negative comments.
I note these comments because they surprised me. In fact, I had to re-read the article (in part because I actually wrote it several months ago and my columns usually get edited for space reasons) after I read the comments. Substantively, I have no problem with the comments although I do think they take me to task for a postion I did not and would not take – they emphasize that there are definitely audits that lawyers will want either their IT department or outside technology consultants to run. I think my article actually makes that point, but the comments provide some good emphasis. No, what surprised me was the condescending tone of the comments, from people apparently so new to the legal profession. I know that I still have a lot to learn, so it’s interesting to see the level of confidence the commenters already have and the tone and attitude they are willing to take at this point in their careers. I’ll let you be the judge. I’ll probably write a response to the comments at some point.
The comments seem to take the position that lawyers should never do anykind of tech audit and that all audits be left to tech professionals. I’m not sure that I can agree that it makes sense for a small firm to hire an outside expert to count the number of scanners it has or do other simple counts. Perhaps I used the word “audit” too imprecisely, but I think there are many ways we all can obtain the types of actionable numbers we need to make business decisions about technology.
Check out the column and see what you think.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Listen to The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal Talk Network.
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Baseball Images: In the Zone – Exhibition

Monday, July 13th, 2009

Lots of interest in St. Louis about the baseball all-star game. On Saturday evening, we took in the opening of a new photography exhibit featuring some prominent baseball photographers, including my brother-in-law, Dan Donovan, who has several excellent photos (see the show’s home page for one of my favorites and you’ll see more here).
The show is at the Maryland Gallery in Clayton, Missouri, and even the most casual baseball fan will the images. If you’re in town for the All-Star Game or are in Clayton from now through August, you’ll want to check out the exhibit.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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OK, What Technology Will We Hear is Dead Today?

Monday, July 6th, 2009

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes. The episode is called “What Technology is Dead Today?” and here’s the description:

Twitter, Facebook, blogging? Hardly a day goes by without someone proclaiming that a technology is “dead.” On this edition of the Kennedy-Mighell Report, co-hosts, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell talk about what technologies to stick with, what to abandon and how you can determine which are best for your law firm. In the Q & A segment, Dennis and Tom will answer audience questions and wrap up with Parting Shots, leaving you with lasting tips and observations.

I had noticed last week that I was seeing a large number of references to technologies being “dead,” most commonly Twitter. I was talking to Tom about building a podcast episode on the topic and did a quick search in my Google Reader, finding seventeen technologies that someone had declared “dead” recently. I didn’t check on ones that had been called “dying.”
In the episode, Tom and I talk about this phenomenon and both what it might mean and what people might mean when they say it. We also talk about how such a declaration might change your approach to technology (or not), how to evaluate such declarations, and a bit about our approach to deciding whether to stay with or abandon a given technology. These are important, but rarely discussed, areas of legal technology.
We also take on a couple of questions that I was asked last week by law students in a class on law practice management at St. Louis University Law School, including what are the “hot” technologies law student might want to focus on. I hope to write a blog post about my experience speaking with that class later this week.
In my “parting shot,” I discuss my rededication to David Allen’s Getting Things Done“>Getting Things Done (GTD) approach to organization and how much I liked Allen’s new book, Making It All Work.
We also extend congratulations to our friend Adriana Linares who has springboarded from her well-received appearances as a guest co-host on our podcast to her own Legal Talk Network podcast with Debbie Foster called Legal Three Point Oh!.. Check it out, along with the other great podcasts on the Legal Talk Network.
Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think.
And try some of the back episodes as well.

A reminder that we have a regular segment in which we answer questions from our audience. Send me your questions about legal technology and we’ll work them into upcoming episodes.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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Recent Microblog Posts – July 1, 2009

Wednesday, July 1st, 2009

DennisKennedy.Microblog is a supplement to this blog that can be found on Twitter at @dkennedyblog. I invite you to become a follower. An explanation of the microblog can be found here.
Here are recent posts from the microblog. As an aside, it’s intriguing to me that any one or all of these would have turned into a blog post with some discussion of the topic several years ago.

Martha Sperry on Friendfeed for Lawyers – http://bit.ly/dNdqg – still more reasons for having Friendfeed on my to-learn list
Steve Rubel: Blogs are Out of Beta, But Bloggers Should Always Be in Beta” – http://bit.ly/WztTW
Meryl Evans on 8 ways to extend your presentations – http://bit.ly/bl0xN
Tim O’Reilly and John Battelle on “Web Squared” – http://bit.ly/vIzrS – the Web on its collision course with the physical world
The Economist on social networking on Internet vs. traditional business networking – http://bit.ly/lfk8t
For fans of Babylon 5, JMS interview on Babylon Podcast – http://bit.ly/g6FGk ‘Nuff said. Even better, there’s a second part coming.
My new blog post – “A Blogging Guide for St. Louis (and Other) Lawyers (and Others)” – http://bit.ly/ZHrMm
John Heckman on Richard Susskind – Commoditization – Part 1 http://bit.ly/WyX15
RT @GreatDismal: Twitter: Return of “telegraphese”. The headline writer’s art. The core art of semantic compression. Lose the trim.
Steve Rubel’s “Posterous is Changing How I Think About Blogging” is changing how I think about blogging – http://bit.ly/d9nTT
Is iPhone really a threat to domination of BlackBerry in legal profession? The new Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast – http://bit.ly/45TLG
RT @GreatDismal: RT @DougCoupland – a strange measure of technology’s acceleration – no cell-phone images of 9-11 attacks.
RT @collabtools: Dion Hinchcliffe on Twitter on your intranet: 17 microblogging tools for business – http://bit.ly/dL2Er
We’re looking for audience questions for tomorrow’s recording of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast – why not yours? [Note: Email me with questions for our podcast Q & A segment any time]
Kevin Kelly on the increasing ubiquity of technology – http://bit.ly/dqW3G – esp. pace of change and impact of a billion of any technology
Peter Bregman: Two Lists You Should Look at Every Morning – http://bit.ly/XKdGY – your focus list & your ignore list – don’t ignore the 2nd
Wish I’d seen Bernard Hibbitts (of Jurist fame) present on “The Technology of Law” – great summary by Library Boy – http://bit.ly/U0TJC
The new episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast is out; it’s about ways lawyers can learn new technology – http://bit.ly/160RKh
Liked AppScout’s “TuneUp Cleans your Music Collection” – http://bit.ly/fgV3r
Note to estate planning lawyers: is Suze Orman on your list of competitors? http://bit.ly/15dNE8 – what can you learn from this?

Check out the new The Kennedy-Mighell Report Podcast on the Legal Talk Network.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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