Technology-Lawyer

Dennis Kennedy

Technology Law and Legal Technology. Dennis Kennedy is one of the few technology lawyers who is also an expert on the underlying technologies. Dennis an award-winning leader in the application of technology and the Internet to the practice of law. DennisKennedy.com gives you access to a wide variety of Dennis Kennedy's resources on legal technology, his writings, his well-known blog, DennisKennedy.Blog, and information about how you can have Dennis speak to your organization or group.

Dennis Kennedy is one of the most knowledgeable legal technologists you will find. - Michael Arkfeld.

Dennis Kennedy, a lawyer and legal technology expert in St. Louis, Mo., has been a significant influence in the ever-evolving relationship between lawyers and the Web. - Robert Ambrogi

Archive for August, 2009

Recent Microblog Posts – August 30, 2009

Sunday, August 30th, 2009

DennisKennedy.Microblog is a supplement to this blog that can be found on Twitter at @dkennedyblog. I invite you to become a follower. An explanation of the microblog can be found here.
Here are recent posts from the microblog:

Amber Riviere: Your blog is your mothership – http://bit.ly/6cixA
Patrick Lamb on Rob Millard’s Insights Into The Future Of Law – http://bit.ly/17nPvA – “vectors” and strategy as ongoing process
RT @collabtools: Jon Udell on using FriendFeed for collaboration – http://bit.ly/OnDTa – the potential of FriendFeed rooms and more
Ron Friedmann’s great notes on “Technologies That Will Disrupt Traditional Legal Practice” – http://bit.ly/4FK8Tv – stellar panel @ilta09
Jeff Carr “Talkin’ Revolution” in Corporate Counsel magazine – http://bit.ly/Zkbw1 – alternative fee models from a visionary
Online reputation management is the subject of new episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast – http://bit.ly/q7OIc
Luis Suarez on the second coming of blogging – http://bit.ly/2wLNDp
RT @InsideLegal: Find InsideLegal/ILTA survey here http://tinyurl.com/ndyfvw – Me: best info about legal tech in law firms available #ilta09
I’ll be following the #ilta09 hashtag this week; will not be at the ILTA Conference in person this year – http://conference.iltanet.org/
Five document assembly/legal technology blogs to follow – http://bit.ly/usvdK – looks like I’ll have chance next month to relearn HotDocs
Bricklin on Technology – a new blog post – http://bit.ly/qhTmG
Can’t attend a tradeshow like #ilta09 in person? Attend via LegalQB – http://bit.ly/19sIB (& a short video of me on LegalQB homepage)
My wife’s great article on wellness programs in law firms – http://bit.ly/I9rMB – congratulating her on her first published article.
Ken Strutin’s list of Law Practice Technology Information Sources and Tools on LLRX.com – http://bit.ly/NAY9p

Check out the latest The Kennedy-Mighell Report Podcast on the Legal Talk Network.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Listen to The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on Legal Talk Network. Latest episode: “The State of the Blawgosphere
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Onliine Reputation Management – Podcast

Monday, August 24th, 2009

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes. The episode is called “Online Reputation Management” (show notes website) and here’s the episode description:

Have all of your posts, comments and mentions on the Internet, especially in social media, become the dreaded “permanent record?” Is what people see in Google about you what you want them to”know” about you? As lawyers participate in social media – Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn, just to name a few – there’s a growing sense that Internet presence is becoming online reputation. In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell look at this important new phenomenon and suggest practical ways that you can find and manage your online reputation, while avoiding the most common pitfalls.

In the episode, Tom and I start from Jim Calloway’s recent excellent post called “Online Reputation Management: First Rule is to Avoid Self-Inflicted Wounds” and a few recent conversations we’ve had with people about whether to “friend” bosses and colleagues on Facebook and explore how social media is changing the nature of online reputation management. It used to be that you were mainly concerned with getting yourself into search engines and getting the word out about you. Now we’re starting to worry about what we can keep out of search engines and who can see what of our online footprints.
We discuss the two key areas of monitoring and mentoring, and offer a few of our favorite practical tips, as well as analogize social media as having some unnerving similarities to the “permanent record” our teachers used to threaten us with.
I wanted to mention my favorite quote from Jim’s post that I didn’t get the chance to use in the podcast:
“So to me, the key to online reputation management is to put lots of positive information about you online and to tell your story. Just overwhelm any critics.”
The podcast also includes answers to two audience questions: what tech would we recommend for law students (probably no one will agree with my recommendation, but, after you think about it, you’ll start to see that I might actually have a good idea or two) and the role usability testing might play in law firm tech decisions.
We end the post with our Parting Shots – practical tips you can use right away. I give my favorite places to find tech tips and Tom points to MIT’s new Personas tool, which is not a bad way to get a handle on your online reputation.
Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think. Show notes are not currently available but should be up soon.
And try some of the back episodes as well.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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Bricklin on Technology

Tuesday, August 18th, 2009

People occasionally ask me about the ROI (return on investment) of Twitter. I see what I’m doing on Twitter (especially DennisKennedy.Microblog) as a series of experiments. I also look at Twitter as another channel for some of my writing and an experimental channel for certain types of information.
To make a long story short, I find it difficult to quantify the ROI of Twitter, mainly because I’m not especially looking at my efforts there in terms of something to quantify.
But let me share a story about an interesting ROI for Twitter for me that illustrates how Twitter can open doors in unexpected ways.
A while back, I was excited to find a blog post linking to Dan Bricklin’s original business school paper about VisiCalc. As many of you know well, Bricklin was a co-creator of the original spreadsheet and a software pioneer in many ways.
I posted the following to Twitter: “Here’s a piece of computing history – Dan Bricklin’s 1978 business school paper on the VisiCalc spreadsheet program – http://bit.ly/Bx3Jd”
Shortly thereafter, probably based on my Twitter post (or at least close enough in time that I’ll assume it was to fit my story), I got an email from Eric Holmgren at Bricklin’s publisher asking if I would like to get a review copy of Bricklin’s book, Bricklin on Technology.
Would I ever.
The book arrived and it was my favorite read of the summer. I cannot recommend it highly enough to anyone interested in both the history of technology and the thought process and observations of one of the undisputed computer technology pioneers.
Yet it’s not just the content of the book, which I’ll talk about in a minute, that fascinates me. The book as a package brilliantly makes the case for the value of a book collection of previously-published blog posts, essays and transcripts thoughtfully arranged and updated. I actually read a good number of the posts feature in the book when they came out, but to have them in one place, in a context and sequence made them feel like new discoveries to me.
“Curation” is a popular buzzword these days, but I get a sense of the value of collection and curation from the way this book is arranged.
However, I’m not recommending the book for its arrangement. It’s simply a great collection of essays, many of them grappling with issues that have been with us throughout the Internet era, and looking at them in their original contexts in the past, as they now exist, and how they might persist into the future.
Yes, you get the story of VisiCalc and the spreadsheet, the first “killer app” that launched the widespread use of PC and some great information and insights about the history of PCs from someone who really was there. That’s great, but even more interesting to me is the breadth, depth and scope of Bricklin’s explorations. When I read the book, I found that I dog-eared a lot of pages that I return to as I write this post.
Consider some of the chapter titles:
What Will People Pay For? (His seminal, thought-provoking essay from 2000 is the springboard to this discussion and his observations about mobile phones and human feeling changed my way of thinking about them)
The Recording Industry and Copying (“Continuing to do things as they have been done for previous decades is not always a good answer in light of technological changes.”)
Leveraging the Crowd (“what drives individuals in their own quest for personal benefit or altruism to the task of helping the whole group”}
Cooperation (singing my song here – after alll I co-authored a book on collaboration and collaboration tools – a fascinating discussion in this chapter about the way the U.S. Navy used chat rooms to collaborate)
Blogging and Podcasting: Observations Through Their Development (on a personal note, I was struck by how many of the earliest “important” blog posts I remember, as I remember Bricklin’s early podcasts. A quote: “When people figure out the uses of technology, it often does not followthe ‘common wisdom’ of the current dominant players. THe old guard’s skepticism doesn’t always hold things back.”)
Tools: My Philosophy About What We Should Be Developing (I wish all software developers read this one. The idea that stuck with me – “the strange goal of computers as natural assistants.”
Hands On: Tablet and Gestural Computing (Now I truly regret moving away from my Tablet PC after it wore out. See my article on Tablet PCs at http://blog.technolawyer.com/2005/04/lets_celebrate_.html, especially point #10 in the article. Bricklin makes a compelling case for a tablet/gestural approach -
The Long Term. (“some principles that could be applied to making software that fits with the long-term needs of society.”}
The PC: Historical Information about an Important Tool. (If you like tech and its history, this is a must-read.You get a feel for the excitement of the early days.}
The Wiki: An Interview with its Inventor (Why do people sometimes think a wiki is the solution for, well, everything? You’ll see why here.The story of Ward Cunningham, the wiki, and creating cooperatively.)
VisiCalc (a great insider’s story of the first killer app)
Summing it All Up. (I was struck with the way Bricklin hit on all of my favorite “big themes,” which is probably why I like the book.)
Bricklin closes with these two sentences that really do seem to sum it all up: “In the world we have been building, all can participate, not just a special few, That is how we are molding technology into a force with which we all can be creative and connect with what is really meaningful to us.”
That’s enough for now. I want you to go out and read Bricklin on Technology.
For me, the book has reshaped my thinking and focus and the ideas have begun to filter into my writing and podcasts.
You might also enjoy Scott Hanselman’s recent podcast with Dan Bricklin and Bricklin’s blog (one of the earliest of all blogs).
I thank Dan Bricklin’s publisher for spotting me and offering me a review copy. I thank Dan for writing the book. Maybe it will help me convince a publisher of the viability of a book called “Kennedy on Legal Technology.” ;-)
What’s the ROI on Twitter? It’s still an experiment for me, but I think the ROI on that tweet was pretty darned good.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Listen to The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on Legal Talk Network. Latest episode: “The State of the Blawgosphere
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Recent Microblog Posts – August 12, 2009

Wednesday, August 12th, 2009

DennisKennedy.Microblog is a supplement to this blog that can be found on Twitter at @dkennedyblog. I invite you to become a follower. An explanation of the microblog can be found here.
Here are recent posts from the microblog. As an aside, it’s intriguing to me that any one or all of these would have turned into a blog post with some discussion of the topic several years ago.

Ken Strutin’s list of Law Practice Technology Information Sources and Tools on LLRX.com – http://bit.ly/NAY9p
Matt Homann Video: Tips for the Suddenly Solo and New Law Firm Associates – http://bit.ly/41J9bA
Meg Edwards illustrates an essential component of #GTD – using next actions and verbs in your to-do lists – http://bit.ly/9mDbz
Just joined Lawyer Connection thanks to @econwriter5. How about you? http://lawyerconnection.ning.com
7 questions for author of ‘Say Everything’ – Scott Rosenberg on blogging and its impact – http://bit.ly/hz0jm – I highly recommend this book
RT @internetcases: Interviewed over at WBEZ studios on legal issues in social media: Listen here: http://is.gd/2aMVB
RT @jimcalloway Please don’t fire me and other thoughts on online reputation management http://tinyurl.com/ps4spf Jim at the top of his game
New blog post about new podcast on the state of the blawgosphere in 2009 – http://bit.ly/3sXfvE (show notes: http://bit.ly/udAVT)
Too common a sight in Chrome: “Sorry, an unexpected condition has occurred which is preventing Google Reader from fulfilling the request.”
My favorite new tech development – Dave Winer on OPML for Twitter, Day 2 – http://bit.ly/1WCsjz – let’s see what day 3 brings
Recording new episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report (http://bit.ly/6s3rX) tomorrow AM. Working title: State of the Blawgosphere 2009
Mike McBride on harsh reality from the Socha-Gelbmann Survey – http://bit.ly/RWpsi – important IT perspective on ediscovery
RT @InsideLegal: Just updated InsideLegal.com Legal Industry Master Events Calendar- Adds. http://tinyurl.com/cp9tzc
Getting more search results from one Site: Google fixes one of the biggest flaws in its display of search results – http://bit.ly/iV96P
My favorite tech idea, OPML reading lists (http://bit.ly/gYCn7), make a comeback in this week’s Rebooting the News – http://bit.ly/Zsqjj
RT @collabtools: Michael Samson on Mobile and Wireless Access to Collaboration Systems – http://bit.ly/3URwkV
RT @matthomann: Presenters, if you’ve got a slide you have to apologize for, it shouldn’t be in your deck. Me: Amen.
Here’s a great podcast – Hanselminutes Podcast 172 – Dan Bricklin on Technology – http://bit.ly/KDglD (Bricklin’s book is also great – hope to post a review soon)

Check out the latest The Kennedy-Mighell Report Podcast on the Legal Talk Network.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Listen to The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on Legal Talk Network. Latest episode: “The State of the Blawgosphere
Technorati tags:

State of the Blawgosphere 2009 – Podcast

Sunday, August 9th, 2009

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes. The episode is called “The State of the Blawgosphere” (show notes here) and here’s the episode description:

On this edition of the Kennedy-Mighell Report, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the current state of legal blogging on the Internet and share with you what is new in the blawgosphere. In the “Stuff We’ve Been Talking About Ourselves” segment, Dennis & Tom will look at the “mobile platform” and how to make your site more mobile-friendly. In Parting Shots, Dennis and Tom leave you with lasting tips and observations.

In the episode, Tom and I discuss the current state of legal blogging on the Internet, and give you our take on what’s going on. We share a few results from Tom’s massive research project on the law blogs he’s covered over the years in his Blawg of the Day feature. We discuss the scope and scale of law-related blogging, the “generations” of law blogging, and in what ways our advice to new law bloggers might be different today than it was a few years ago. I also recommend Scott Rosenberg’s new book, Say Everything: How Blogging Began, What It’s Becoming, and Why It Matters.
In a “Stuff We’ve Been Talking About Ourselves” segment, we note that we’ve been talking about smartphones and the “mobile platform.” We’ve been talking about whether it makes sense to create versions of our blogs and websites optimized for the mobile platform. Absolutely yes.
The question then became: Well, how do you do that? Does it require a web developer or are there simple, easy and free ways to create your own mobile versions. In about ten minutes of research, we found the answer was a resounding “yes!” and we put some helpful links in the show notes.
Here’s the quick, mobile-friendly version of my blog I created with Mofuse. (Note: it doesn’t seem to be displaying for me when I use the Google Chrome browser.)
In my “parting shot” (useful tip), I mention that I’ve been unsubscribing to a bunch of email newsletters, which leaves me more time to read my favorite email newsletters, especially the TechnoLawyer family of email newsletters. I also mention how much I liked the new issue of the Law Practice Today webzine Wendy Werner edited on the Suddenly Solo phenomenon. Tom talks about his latest web experiment – a linkstream.
Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think.
And try some of the back episodes as well.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Technorati tags: