Looking Forward: Legal Technology in 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “Looking Forward: Legal Technology in 2010” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Bill4Time. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – we’re very pleased with the growing numbers of downloads the podcast is getting.
Here’s the episode description:

In part two of this two-part series on legal technology trends, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell peer into the crystal ball to find the key trends and storylines to expect in legal technology in 2010. Will the economy keep a lid on significant developments? What role will Internet and mobile technologies play? What should lawyers, law firms and other legal organizations be putting into their strategic technology plans? In addition, Dennis and Tom make predictions about technology in general and legal technology in particular.

Tom and I boldly look into the crystal ball to highlight some key trends for 2010. It’s a wide-ranging conversation that covers the continuing role of the current economic situation on technology decisions, cloud computing and mobile technologies, real-time tech, the maturation of social media, and WIndows 7 and Office 2010.
[By the way, despite what I've read recently on blogs and in Twitter, Dennis Kennedy definitely does NOT believe that Windows 7 will bomb in law firms. I'll probably need to set the record straight in a blog post soon. In the meantime, you might listen to our earlier podcast on Windows 7 to get my perspectives on Windows 7. I'm also working on my annual legal tech trends article.]
In our audience questions segment (we always welcome your questions for any podcast), we made a few quick predictions in couple of legal tech areas. We didn’t discuss our individual predictions in advance and I was able to catch Tom off-guard with some of my predictions.
We end the podcast with our Parting Shots – practical tips you can use right away. Tom raves about LogMeIn Express, a simple screensharing application that can be used for collaboration and other things. I point people to the new iPhone App from Dragon that lets you do speech recognition through an iPhone or iPod Touch nicely illustrates the mobile and cloud computing trends we discuss in the podcast.
Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think. Show notes for the podcast are at here.
And try some of the back episodes as well.
THE KENNEDY-MIGHELL REPORT PODCAST IS NOW ON TWITTER. You can now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.
Just a note about the experiment we want to try with a public “wave” for the show we’ve opened up in Google Wave. If interested in joining the wave, you can either ask us to add you or, assuming you are already a Wave user, search for it in Wave using “with: public” “Kennedy-Mighell Report”. Among other things, we’ll use it as a way to gather questions for our audience Q&A segments and also use it as an experiment in how Google Wave might be used.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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Comments

  1. says

    Drop box and Google Apps are two of the hottest new tech arenas I will be using in 2010. Of course my BlackBerry Curve 8530 is incredible too. I will be leaving my office in Beverly Hills and going totally home office cloud computing. Don’t you think that FaceBook and Twitter are kind of a waste of time?

  2. says

    I totally agree with Los Angeles Paralegal. For business purposes, FaceBook and Twitter ARE a waste of time. Real business usually still comes from Google searches, websites, referrals and even phone book ads. Who is really going to be looking for a lawyer on Twitter?