Technology-Lawyer

Dennis Kennedy

Technology Law and Legal Technology. Dennis Kennedy is one of the few technology lawyers who is also an expert on the underlying technologies. Dennis an award-winning leader in the application of technology and the Internet to the practice of law. DennisKennedy.com gives you access to a wide variety of Dennis Kennedy's resources on legal technology, his writings, his well-known blog, DennisKennedy.Blog, and information about how you can have Dennis speak to your organization or group.

Dennis Kennedy is one of the most knowledgeable legal technologists you will find. - Michael Arkfeld.

Dennis Kennedy, a lawyer and legal technology expert in St. Louis, Mo., has been a significant influence in the ever-evolving relationship between lawyers and the Web. - Robert Ambrogi

Archive for February, 2010

Social Media and Internet Tips for Law Students – Upcoming Presentation

Sunday, February 28th, 2010

On Tuesday, at St. Louis University Law School on March 2 at 5:00, I’ll be speaking to law students, recent law school graduates and anyone else who might be interested about social media, the Internet and tegal technology with a focus on how you can use these tools to effectively launch your legal career. Phi Delta Phi is sponsoring the event.
I’ll take an informal approach, with lots of Q & A, and I’m planning to let the audience pick the topics they most want me to cover. In other words,I’ll see if i can “crowdsource” the structure of the presentation.
I’ll highlight some of my ideas from this post on advice for 1Ls and my latest ABA Journal column called “Saving Face,” but I expect to share a lot of other information based on my own experience and what I’ve learned over the years. I’m also hoping to learn a lot from the perspecitives of law students who are facing these tough economic times.
There are two places you can find more information on the presentation – on the Law School’s calendar page and the Facebook page for the event. There’s also an email address for information – pdp@slu.edu.
Please mention the event to law students or others in St. Louis who might be interested. It’d be great to see you there.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Listen to The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on Legal Talk Network. Twitter: @tkmreport
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Opening Up to Open Source – Podcast

Thursday, February 25th, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “Opening Up to Open Source” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Bill4Time. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – we’re very pleased with the growing numbers of downloads the podcast is getting.
Here’s the episode description:

Budgetary concerns have forced lawyers to take a hard look at software costs. That’s brought Open Source software onto their radar screens. The price – free – is obviously attractive, but Open Source is a completely different approach to software than lawyers expect. In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell introduce the approach and philosophy of Open Source, the programs available, and when and where it might make sense for you.

I’ve long wanted to do an episode about Open Source software and Tom was gracious enough to let me pick the topic for this episode.
My interest in Open Source software and the Open Source licenses goes back a long way. Believe it or not, I’ve even written a law review article on the Open Source licenses, “Dennis M. Kennedy, A PRIMER ON OPEN SOURCE LICENSING LEGAL ISSUES: COPYRIGHT, COPYLEFT AND COPYFUTURE, 20 St. Louis U. Pub. L. Rev. 345 (2001), which was one of the early law review articles on the topic.
Although we talk a bit about the Open Source licenses and Open Source philosophy that are playing such a huge role in software development and the Internet these days, our main focus is on the ways lawyers might consider and make informed decisions about if, when and how they might use Open Source software.
If you have not considered Open Source before, I recommend this podcast as a gentle introduction. A diligent researcher should also be able to find other articles and a podcast I’ve done on Open Source topics. We also discuss Open Source programs in our collboration tools book.
In our “things we’ve been talking about” segment, I get Tom to explain the relatively new geo-location social media platform, FourSquare, to me. Tom does a great job of explaining, but he didn’t convince me yet.
We end the podcast with our Parting Shots – practical tips you can use right away. Tom likes a free only PDF form tool called FillAnyPDF andalso mentions a resource for PowerPoint templates. I rave about using the keyboard shortcut + .+ T to reopen browser tabs after you accidentally close them.
Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think. Show notes for the podcast are at here.
And try some of the back episodes as well.
THE KENNEDY-MIGHELL REPORT PODCAST IS NOW ON TWITTER. You can now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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Celebrating the Seventh Blogiversary of DennisKennedy.Blog

Monday, February 15th, 2010

Seven years ago today, I launched this blog on an unsuspecting world as an early birthday present to myself, with a general sense that not only was I late to blogging, but that I had in fact missed the whole blogging thing. I also saw this blog as means to get to what i really wanted to do – have my own RSS feed.
The initial post was a simple one:

And so it begins . . .
I realized the other day that I had first written about blogs well over a year ago. In fact, the rise of blogs was one of my 2002 predictions for legal technology in my annual legal tech predictions article. As I was working on updating my web site (http://www.denniskennedy.com), I finally decided that I had to have my own blog. Thanks to people like Jerry Lawson, Sabrina Pacifici, the Support Forum at MovableType.org, it’s finally here.

Jerry Lawson pointed out to me that I first wrote about blogs for lawyers even earlier than I remembered inthat initial post before I actually started my own blog. When I read Soctt Rosenberg’s great history of blogging, Say Anything, last year, I was struck most by how long I was a reader of blogs (quite a few years) before I actually started my own. That was probably in large part due to the fact that I was writing a monthly legal tech column and other articles (and I was adding content regularly to my website), but it still is a big surprise to me to see how long I sat on the sidelines of blogging. I think I made up for the delay, and it’s difficult to put into words how mch I treasure the friendships that came to me through blogging. A special thanks to all of you.
It’s been a tradition here that I pull out the stops for the blawgiversary and tend to make extravagant claims about how the rest of the world treats the blawgiversary and do things like coin terms like blawgiversary (which I believe i might have done years ago in a momemnt of weakness). I was going to drop that this year until I realized that the US government had indeed created a federal holiday to give many of you a day off to celebrate the blawgiversary. Enjoy!
Seriously, though, I try to do a few special things this week to celebrate the birthdays of my blog and me. Although I’m planning to take a more low-key approach to that this week than I usually have done, I do like to take this time to thank my readers and do a little bit of a reader-appreciation week. So, watch for some special posts this week.
For the most part, however, I want to say a big thank you to readers of this blog and say that I’m looking forward to the next year of blogging, both here and on DennisKennedy.Microblog, the companion Twiiter experiment for this blog.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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iPad: Gadget or Game Changer? – Podcast

Saturday, February 13th, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “The iPad: Gadget or Game Changer?” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Bill4Time. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – we’re very pleased with the growing numbers of downloads the podcast is getting.
Here’s the episode description:

No product launch in recent memory has commanded the attention of Apple’s iPad announcement. Is the iPad a game-changer, the must-have of 2010, or just one more imperfect choice for technology users already facing too many choices? In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the iPad, hype vs. reality, and what this new product might mean for lawyers who use technology. Their conclusions might surprise you.

Undeterred by having no on-hands experience with an iPad whatsoever, Tom and I offer our reactions to Apple’s recent announcement of the iPad and our analysis of the prospects for the iPad. We take a look at the history of tablet computing, my long-time fascination with Tablet PCs and delve into the ros and cons of the iPad that most people seem to be talking about in the initial round of reactions to the announcment.
We’re intrigued by the way the iPad moves us further onto the mobile platform and cloud computing, but see the iPad as a content delivery device moreso than a content creation device, although the development of apps will be key to the content creation side of things. We end with our own take on the “odds makers” segment of ESPN’s Pardon the Interruption show, surprising ourselves with our very positive reaction to the iPad.
However, we’re not optimistic that we’ll see much adoption of the iPad in the legal community, except in the world of solos and small firms, and, of course, among the growing group of Macintosh-using lawyers. We’ll see some cool things happening in that space.
In our “things we’ve been talking about” segment, we talked about the chance we got to get a pre-release look at the new WestLaw Next release and our quite positive reactions to it. [Disclaimer: Like others asked to review the new WestlawNext, tom and I received iPod Nanos from Thomson Reuters - we received these gifts after this edition of The Kennedy-Mighell Report was recorded, so you can gauge our opinions in that context.]
We end the podcast with our Parting Shots – practical tips you can use right away. Tom points to ReadTwit, a way to get to Twitter links in an easy-to-manage RSS feed. I pick up on a recent article by Ross Kodner mentioning one of my favorite little tools, the typewriter feature in Adobe Acrobat..
Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think. Show notes for the podcast are at here.
And try some of the back episodes as well.
THE KENNEDY-MIGHELL REPORT PODCAST IS NOW ON TWITTER. You can now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.
Just a note about the experiment (as yet largely unsuccessful) we are trying with a public “wave” for the show we’ve opened up in Google Wave. If interested in joining the wave, you can either ask us to add you or, assuming you are already a Wave user, search for it in Wave using “with: public” “Kennedy-Mighell Report”. Among other things, we’ll use it as a way to gather questions for our audience Q&A segments and also use it as an experiment in how Google Wave might be used.
[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
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My Latest ABA Journal Technology Column Introduces the Mobile Platform

Tuesday, February 9th, 2010

My latest technology column for the ABA Journal is out. It’s called “Going Mobile: Your future work platform is on the phone ” and it takes a practical look at what is starting to seem like a smartphone revolution.
My goal in this column was to provide a simple introduction and primer to what Tom Mighell and I have been calling the “mobile platform” on our podcast. We are moving to a world where smartphones are commonplace, where smartphones run applications and give us anywhere, anytime Internet access, and, as a result, the everyday world of technology use seems to be moving us to working on our smartphones.
In the column, I offer a gentle introduction to world of iPhone and other mobile apps, the implications of anytime, anywhere access, and how expectations are changing and will continue to change. The idea is that you need to start looking at your smartphone to do more than handle email and make calls.
I highlight three key developments:

1. New expectations of availability.
2. Moving from synchronization to realtime access.
3. The “apps” phenomenon -using a smartphone to perform computer-like functions.

I end with four simple and gentle suggestions to get started on the mobile platform. None of this will be big news for heavy smartphone users, but it’s meant to be a primary for the many lawyers who are upgrading or moving for the first time to smartphones rather than standard cellphones. On the other hand, it might give you an outline for making the argument why you need a new-generation smartphone – iPhone, Android, BlackBerry, Palm or other platform. I do hope you’ll like the column more than the first commenter, who seemed to be a little underwhelmed.
The money quote:

Mobile is an area of technology where you don’t realize that you have a need until you understand what’s out there. Even a simple application for timekeeping can have great benefit if it helps you contemporaneously track time that you might otherwise forget.

Check out my new column. I also recommend a podcast on the mobile platform that Tom Mighell and I recorded a few months ago.
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[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]
Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog; Follow me – @denniskennedy.
Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools
Listen to The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal Talk Network. Twitter: @tkmreport
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