Some Recent Podcasts and Articles for You

I wanted to wish everyone a happy Thanksgiving. It’s a good time to say “thnak you!” to my patient readers (and the impatient ones, too). I’m hoping to get back onto a regular blogging schedule soon.

I also wanted to highlight some of my recent podcasts, articles and other odds & ends.

Podcasting portraitTom Mighell and I just reached the 140-episode milestone for The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast. It’s great working with the Legal Talk Network team on the podcast. I recommend subscribing to the the podcast (free) in iTunes or in a podcast app.

I mention subscribing because we often get questions about how best to download and listen to podcast episodes and how to receive them automatically when they are released. In episode 140, we took an in-depth and practical look at how to answers these questions and also how best to listen to podcasts. I can tell you that the key words are “subscribing” and “time-shifting.” The episode, called “The Fundamentals of Podcasts: Listening and Subscribing,” has a lot of practical advice and our reflections about the podcast medium (which we love).TKMR Logo

Other recent episodes:

Turning Legal Services into Products

Get Ready for Your Video Call Closeup

Surveying 2014 Legal Technology Surveys

The College of Law Practice Management’s 2014 Futures Conference

Planet of the Apps: How Lawyers Are Using Apps

A few recent articles:

My ABA Journal technology column is now called “Kennedy on Tech.” The most recent columns are:

Preparing for the ‘Internet of things’

Get the most out of PowerPoint and Keynote with the ‘Presenter View’

Speaking:

I do a limited amount of speaking these days (but am always happy to be asked). Recently, my “Ethical Cybersecurity for the Non-technical Lawyer” has been popular.

I have a LinkedIn presentation called “LINKEDIN TRAINING: TAKING YOUR CAREER DEVELOPMENT & NETWORKING INTO THE DIGITAL AGE” for the St. Louis Chapter of the Association of Corporate Counsel coming up on January 14 at the Ritz-Carlton in Clayton, MO. Details and registration information are here. Note that attendees will receive a copy of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, co-authored by Allison Shields and me. If you can’t attend or are looking for a great gift for the lawyer on your list (maybe even you), you can order a copy of the book at the ABA Bookstore.

And those are some of my recent podcasts, articles and other odds & ends. Best wishes for the holiday to all.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Recents Podcasts, Articles and Odds & Ends

I wanted to highlight some of my recent podcasts, articles and other odds & ends.

If you are in St. Louis this Thursday and Friday, I’ll be at the ABA Law Practice Division Spring Meeting and the Law Firm Marketing Strategies Conference (excellent group of speakers and topics – highly recommended).

Tom Mighell and I have continued our biweekly episodes of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast, recently hitting the episode 125 milestone. The last few episodes have been especially fun and we appreciate the good feedback we’ve gotten. We also had a great time at ABA TECHSHOW hanging out with the Legal Talk Network team. As always, the best way to get the podcast is to subscribe to it (free) in iTunes.

Recent episodes:Kennedy-Mighell Report picture

Presentation Tips for Legal Professionals

ABA TECHSHOW 2014 Wrapup

Legal Ethics and Cybersecurity

Talking Legal Evolution: Innovation’s Pace in the Legal Industry

The Benefits of Tech Automation: Why Attorneys Should Opt In

A few recent articles:

Allison Shields and I wrote a popular article (several requests for reprinting already) called “Fourteen LinkedIn Tips for 2014” in the ABA’s Law Practice Today webzine. There are even more tips in our new book, LinkedIn in One Hour.

My ABA Journal technology column is now called “Kennedy on Tech.” The three most recent columns are:

What can ‘gamification’ do for lawyers?

Social media has trade-offs for lawyers

5 ways to make good on your New Year’s tech resolutions

I do a limited amount of speaking these days (but am always happy to be asked). I’ve lately been speaking about LinkedIn on webinars, social media ethics at the Mound City Bar Association’s Ronda F. Williams CLE Retreat (named in honor of Ronda Williams, a lawyer who impacted many people and died far too young), and digital estate planning. I also recently enjoyed getting to speak to law students at Washington University Law School.

On May 15, I’m debuting a new presentation called “Ethical Cybersecurity for the Non-technical Lawyer” at the St. Louis Corporate Counsel Institute, co-sponsored by the Association of Corporate Counsel – St. Louis Chapter and the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis. I’m glad I checked the location when I grabbed the link above because I hadn’t realized the event has moved to a new location.

And those are some of my recent podcasts, articles and other odds & ends

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Protecting Your Online Accounts with a Little Knowledge

I contribute a post monthly to the Law Technology Today blog. You can find all my posts in one convenient location.

The most recent post is called “A Little Knowledge Goes a Long Way in Protecting Your Online Accounts.”

The post highlights a great recent post from Chris Hoffman called “How Attackers Actually ‘Hack Accounts’ Online and How to Protect Yourself.” I call it “a welcome starting point and primer for all of us to understand how accounts get broken into and the simple steps we can take to make our accounts safer than they are now.”

I especially like Hoffman’s conclusion:

”People who say their accounts have been ‘hacked’ are likely guilty of re-using passwords, installing a key logger, or giving their credentials to an attacker after social engineering tricks. They may also have been compromised as a result of easily guessed security questions. If you take proper security precautions, it won’t be easy to ‘hack’ your accounts. Using two-factor authentication can help, too — an attacker will need more than just your password to get in.”

He highlights five key problem areas, with clear and helpful explanations:

1. Reusing Passwords.

2. Keyloggers.

3. Social Engineering.

4. Answering Security Questions.

5. Email Account and Password Resets.

I offer my own take on each of these issues in my post.

Making even a little effort to learn about these issues can really help you protect your online accounts. What are you waiting for?

- Dennis Kennedy

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Two New Tech Columns: Law Firm Apps and Departure Policies

My latest two ABA Journal tech columns are called “Apt to make apps? What you need to consider before jumping in” and “5 tech policies law firms should consider to prep for job departures.”

1. Apt to make apps? What you need to consider before jumping in

In this column, I did a little investigation into mobile apps (really, iOS apps) that law firms and lawyers had created so far. My research was not scientific or thorough, but it gave me an indication of what the typical person looking for law firm apps would find. I didn’t find a lot of these apps, but, to generalize, most fell into the megafirm category or the auto accident firm category.

Some of the apps look to be be useful, and some are underwhelming.

The exercise gave me something think about in how lawyers might create mobile apps and I try to draw a few practical conclusions and give some tips about costs and approaches to apps.

The money quote:

In some ways the current app environment is reminiscent of the early days of webpages in 1995 or blogging in 2002 or 2003, when there was a small number of early adopters among the legal profession. For some, moving to the Web or blogging was a rewarding and successful step. For at least as many, it was a move that did not make sense. And for the majority, their efforts did not make much of an impact.

While I don’t expect law firm mobile apps to become as ubiquitous as law firm websites, I’m intrigued by the ways law firms might take advantage of the apps platform.

Read the entire column at “Apt to make apps? What you need to consider before jumping in.”

2. 5 tech policies law firms should consider to prep for job departures

This column was suggested by a lawyer friend of mine in St. Louis when we had breakfast a few months ago. He mentioned that knowing what to do when a lawyer (or any staff member) left a firm was hard enough, but determining what to do about technology when someone left was really difficult. He talked about some of the approaches he had seen and taken and thought that the topic would be good for a column. I agreed.

I focused on five key policies, but want to emphasize how important it is to be flexible and have a good understanding of what is happening at the time and what is at stake.

This area struck me as one where lawyers were likely to be advising clients on appropriate employee manuals and policies, but not bother to implement them for their own firms. It’s also an area where manuals and policies can only take you so far. I vividly remember when the IT director at my then firm left a manila envelope with some notes and a “yesterday was my last day” letter on my chair for me to find when I came in in the morning.

The column focuses on some of the biggest issues (there are more, to be sure) and makes a few practical suggestions for each.

The money quote:

Common responses to the technology issues raised by a departing lawyer or employee can be ad hoc, chaotic and woefully incomplete, raising more problems than the firm solves.

If you haven’t given this subject some attention recently, there is no time the present to revisit it with fresh eyes.

Read the entire column at “5 tech policies law firms should consider to prep for job departures.”

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

New Article: 13 Facebook Tips for Lawyers in 2013

In perhaps the classic example of “I didn’t have enough time to write a shorter article, so I wrote a longer one,” I have a new article out in the February issue of the Law Practice Today webzine. It runs about 3,000 words and is called “Thirteen Facebook Tips for Lawyers in 2013.”

As the article summary says:

Still scared of Facebook? Come on, it’s 2013 already—can 1 billion users really all be wrong? Here are 13 tips to guide even the most reluctant late adopter on how to get the most of the most popular social media tool.

The article offers some of my observations about lawyers using (and, mainly, not using) Facebook, thirteen practical tips (anybody else notice that matching the number of tips to the year has upped the degree of difficulty for these types of tips articles?), and three simple action steps to get yourself going on Facebook.

The money quote:

There are many reasons lawyers probably should be using Facebook, but I’m not sure that convince many reluctant lawyers with those reasons. Instead, consider my view that there may be no better resource than Facebook to help you reconnect with people who were important in your life with whom you have lost contact.

I expect that Allison Shields and I will cover many of these tips in more detail in our upcoming presentation on LinkedIn and Facebook at ABA TECHSHOW 2013 in Chicago in April.You will also have the chance to talk about these topics with Allison and me at the Taste of TECHSHOW dinner we will be hosting on April 4.

Hope you find the new article helpful.If you want to dive even deeper into Facebook, you might consider reading Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, which is also available in an iBook version.

What other tips do you have for for lawyers to make better use of Facebook?

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.