Technology-Lawyer

Dennis Kennedy

Technology Law and Legal Technology. Dennis Kennedy is one of the few technology lawyers who is also an expert on the underlying technologies. Dennis an award-winning leader in the application of technology and the Internet to the practice of law. DennisKennedy.com gives you access to a wide variety of Dennis Kennedy's resources on legal technology, his writings, his well-known blog, DennisKennedy.Blog, and information about how you can have Dennis speak to your organization or group.

Dennis Kennedy is one of the most knowledgeable legal technologists you will find. - Michael Arkfeld.

Dennis Kennedy, a lawyer and legal technology expert in St. Louis, Mo., has been a significant influence in the ever-evolving relationship between lawyers and the Web. - Robert Ambrogi

Archive for the ‘Legal Technology’ Category

GC Research Club Interview about Legal Technology

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

William Barns Graham at the GC Research Club interviewed me a while back about technology as it relates to in-house counsel, some of my uses of technology, collaboration and other topics. The interview originally ran in two parts, but has been collected conveniently in one place, as “GCRC Interview: Dennis Kennedy, Vice President, Counsel at MasterCard Worldwide – Whole Interview” on the GCResearchClub.com website, along with other interviews, all of which I would recommend. It’s nice to be able to reach an international audience with this interview.

Ann Page, in her “JANUARY 2014 REPORT – Legal Department Technological Solutions – What To Consider and Where To Start?“, highlighted a quote from the interview:

Because legal work is so collaborative, there’s a push to use new collaborative technologies, communication technologies and specialized practice technologies on an ongoing basis. We’ve still yet to get much past breaking the surface of analytical, automation and knowledge management tools.

In the interview, I talked about:

  • How my experience in law and technology complement each other
  • What technologies in-house counsel can use to better align their work to the demands of their employees
  • Whether lawyers and IT departments work well enough together
  • How big “cyberlaw” might become
  • Some of the technologies I personally use
  • Useful phone and tablet apps for lawyers

I had fun doing the interview and had fun re-reading it the other day. You might also find the interview worth your time and effort, especially if you are an in-house counsel or work with in-house counsel.

Let me know what you think.

Link to full interview.

LIOHFL 2ed Image

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Presentation Tips for Legal Professionals: A Podcast Series

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

I’ve done a number of presentations lately in all sorts of formats – solo, duo, panels and webcasts. For the Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal Talk Network, Tom and I decided to record an episode in which we shared some of our latest tips and observations about presenting. The result was the episode called “Presentation Tips for Legal Professionals.”
Kennedy-Mighell Report picture
After that podcast, we realized that we had barely tapped the surface of what we wanted to say on presentations, so I was able to talk Tom into recording two more episodes on presenting as part of a panel and presenting on webinars – “Panel Presentation Pointers for Legal Professionals” and “Webinar Presentation Pointers for Legal Professionals.”

As a result, we now have a three-part series with our latest thinking and tips about presenting. On the podcasts, we also talk about Heartbleed, the presenter mode in PowerPoint and the “right to be forgotten.”

We invite you to listen to all of the episodes and welcome your reactions, questions and tips of your own. We might even do a follow-up segment highlighting the best of the comments and tips we get. We also want to gauge the interest in a short book of presentation tips, probably in a low cost eBook format.

Get these episodes (and many more) on Legal Talk Network, on the ABA’s Law Technology Today blog, or, perhaps best of all, by subscribing to the podcast on iTunes.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Recents Podcasts, Articles and Odds & Ends

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

I wanted to highlight some of my recent podcasts, articles and other odds & ends.

If you are in St. Louis this Thursday and Friday, I’ll be at the ABA Law Practice Division Spring Meeting and the Law Firm Marketing Strategies Conference (excellent group of speakers and topics – highly recommended).

Tom Mighell and I have continued our biweekly episodes of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast, recently hitting the episode 125 milestone. The last few episodes have been especially fun and we appreciate the good feedback we’ve gotten. We also had a great time at ABA TECHSHOW hanging out with the Legal Talk Network team. As always, the best way to get the podcast is to subscribe to it (free) in iTunes.

Recent episodes:Kennedy-Mighell Report picture

Presentation Tips for Legal Professionals

ABA TECHSHOW 2014 Wrapup

Legal Ethics and Cybersecurity

Talking Legal Evolution: Innovation’s Pace in the Legal Industry

The Benefits of Tech Automation: Why Attorneys Should Opt In

A few recent articles:

Allison Shields and I wrote a popular article (several requests for reprinting already) called “Fourteen LinkedIn Tips for 2014” in the ABA’s Law Practice Today webzine. There are even more tips in our new book, LinkedIn in One Hour.

My ABA Journal technology column is now called “Kennedy on Tech.” The three most recent columns are:

What can ‘gamification’ do for lawyers?

Social media has trade-offs for lawyers

5 ways to make good on your New Year’s tech resolutions

I do a limited amount of speaking these days (but am always happy to be asked). I’ve lately been speaking about LinkedIn on webinars, social media ethics at the Mound City Bar Association’s Ronda F. Williams CLE Retreat (named in honor of Ronda Williams, a lawyer who impacted many people and died far too young), and digital estate planning. I also recently enjoyed getting to speak to law students at Washington University Law School.

On May 15, I’m debuting a new presentation called “Ethical Cybersecurity for the Non-technical Lawyer” at the St. Louis Corporate Counsel Institute, co-sponsored by the Association of Corporate Counsel – St. Louis Chapter and the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis. I’m glad I checked the location when I grabbed the link above because I hadn’t realized the event has moved to a new location.

And those are some of my recent podcasts, articles and other odds & ends

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

#ABATECHSHOW: LinkedIn How-to Session and Much More

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

It’s time for ABA TECHSHOW and I’m wrapping up my preparations. Hope to see you there. If you can’t be there, remember that you can get a peek of what is happening at the conference by checking out the Twitter hashtag #ABATECHSHOW. I’ll note that you can still get registered and attend. You can also get an Exhibit Hall pass for a day, and I always strongly encourage law students in Chicago to take advantage of special deals for law students.

I have a typically busy schedule, starting right away with an introductory “State of Legal Technology” panel presentation at the opening of TECHSHOW with Adriana Linares, Tom Mighell, Allison Shields and Paul Unger that will give a fast-paced summary of highlights from the 2013 ABA Technology Survey.

My main presentation is 2:15 PM on Friday, March 27, when Allison Shields and I will present a session on LinkedIn for Lawyers as part of the “How-to” track. We have decided on what we hope will be a great approach to learning LinkedIn. We’ll focus on LinkedIn Profiles and do some real-time editing of my LinkedIn Profile in an interactive way to help people learn how to edit their own Profiles and follow along and make changes during the session. I think this will be fun, practical and also result in me getting some updates to my own Profile actually done.

For people who want to talk more about LinkedIn after the session or can’t attend the session, Allison and I are hosting a Taste of TECHSHOW dinner on Friday night at Roy’s Hawaiian Restaurant. Be sure to sign up for the dinner before it sells out. For an even more radical approach, I believe there might still be an opportunity to sponsor the dinner.

Obviously, both the session and the dinner will help get the word out on our two new LinkedIn books, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition) and LinkedIn in One Hour. LIOHFL 2ed Image

Allison and I have published a couple of LinkedIn articles in 2014: Fourteen LinkedIn Tips for 2014 and Making the Most of LinkedIn. Allison’s LegalEase blog also has great ongoing coverage of LinkedIn for lawyers. We’ll also be presenting a webinar on LinkedIn for Lawyers: Getting Real World Results from Online Networking for ALI CLE on April 7.

I’ll also be co-hosting a Taste of TECHSHOW dinner on Thursday night on the topic of living in two tech worlds (Mac and PC, iOS and Android, et al.). Tom will be speaking on iPads for Lawyers at the Chicago Apple Store on Michigan Avenue tonight. There’s also what should be another excellent LexThink .1 tonight.

I’ll also be working booths for the ABA Law Practice Division Publishing Board, the Legal Technology Resource Center, and the Conference Concierge booth (Saturday morning 8:00 to 9:30 (maybe the best time to talk to me)). I’ll also be involved in a “So You Want to Write for the ABA” session, where I’ll discuss ways to write for the Legal Technology Resource Center (a great opportunity for anyone interested in legal technology).

Wow, I’m going to be busy, but ABA TECHSHOW is always my favorite technology conference. And, as I’m sure I’ll be reminding myself, it’s the good kind of tired.

Hope to see you there. If you read this blog, be sure to introduce yourself.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Announcing the 2013 Blawggie Awards – Tenth Edition

Monday, December 23rd, 2013

Welcome to the 2013 edition of Dennis Kennedy’s annual Best of Law-related Blogging Awards, affectionately known as the “Blawggies.”

The Blawggies, which honor the best law-related blogs as determined from my personal and highly-opinionated perspective, were first unleashed on an unsuspecting blogosphere in December 2004 and are an annual tradition here at DennisKennedy.Blog.

This historic tenth edition of the awards makes them the longest running annual awards list for law-related blogs selected by a lawyer named Dennis Kennedy living in St. Louis, Missouri. What was originally just a crazy idea turned into a bit of an institution in the world of law-related blogging, illustrating my original premise: “Hey, I have a blog and there’s nothing stopping me from making up my own awards.”

I’ve included some explanatory and historical information about the Blawggies at the end of this post. As I’ve said before and explain in more detail at the end of this post, the Blawggies are not based on any popular votes, surveys or, God forbid, objective criteria. I choose the winners from only the blogs I read regularly. They are highly-opinionated choices made by me alone as I write this post.

Executive Summary.

Spoiler Alert In this era of short attention spans, many people, especially lawyers, do not like three thousand word posts such as this one. Even fewer like long introductions to even long blog posts, or reading through commentary to learn the award winners. What follows is the executive summary list of winners. If you’d like to keep up the level of suspense, you’ll want to scroll quickly past the summary list. If all you really want to know is whether I mention you or your blawg, hit control-F (or command-F for Mac users) and search for your name or your blawg’s name.

Here’s the list of the award winners. I will encourage you to read the whole post for details and the runner-up choices, and my thoughts about the blawgs. And I definitely encourage you to add the RSS feeds to all of these blogs to your RSS reader or “regularly-visited blogs” list.

2013 Blawggie Award Categories and Winners.


1. Best Overall Law-Related Blog – 3 Geeks and a Law Blog

2. The “Marty Schwimmer” Best Practice-Specific Legal Blog – Sharon Nelson’s Ride the Lightning

3. Best Law Practice Management Blog – Adam Smith, Esq.

4. Best Law-related Blog Category – Law Librarian Blogs

5. The “Kennedy-Mighell Report” Best Legal Podcast – The Return of the Legal Talk Network

6. The “Sherry Fowler” Best Writing on a Blawg Award – Sharon Nelson’s Ride the Lightning

7. Best Law Professor Blog – Legal Skills Prof Blog

8. The “DennisKennedy.Blog” Best Legal Technology Blog – V. Mary Abraham’s Above and Beyond KM

9. Best New Blawg – Jerry Lawson’s NetLawTools

10. Best Blawg Aggregator – Tie: TechnoLawyer’s BlawgWorld; Pinhawk Law Technology Daily Digest

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I encourage you to keep reading this post to learn about the winning blogs (and why I felt that they were winners) and about the runners-up.

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THE 2013 BLAWGGIE AWARDS

1. Best Overall Law-Related Blog – 3 Geeks and a Law Blog

I decided to single out the excellent 3 Geeks and a Law Blog not only for great content, but also for its ability to generate serious discussions. With everyone involved in several forms of social media, “engagement” and discussion with blog posts and blog comments is becoming harder to find than ever before. This blog has raised a lot of great questions about law and law practice and gotten people talking about those issues. I admit the authors and especially like how they’ve been able to keep a group blog going in a vibrant way – a rarity in the blawg world. My hat is off to 3 Geeks and a Law Blog for making themselves an easy choice for this award in 2013. Congratulations to Toby Brown, Greg Lambert, Lisa Salazar and their team of helpers.

Runner-up – Jordan Furlong’s Law21 blog won the 2012 Blawggie in the “best overall” category and continued in a very strong fashion this year, ending the year with a thought-provoking post called “You Say You Want a Revolution” that’s garnered a lot of attention. The post exemplifies Jordan’s coverage of law practice and the legal profession with insight, creativity and a willingness to challenge business-as-usual approaches.

2. The Marty Schwimmer Best Practice-Specific Blog – Sharon Nelson’s Ride the Lightning

This category is named for Marty Schwimmer, whose The Trademark Blog, has long been my gold standard for what a practice-specific blog should be. Cybersecurity, discovery and data privacy have become front-and-center issues for many lawyers in 2013 (and should become top of mind for many more lawyers). I’ve really enjoyed Sharon Nelson’s Ride the Lightning blog this year. She focuses on computer security and ediscovery, but has branched out in privacy and other areas. The posts are practical and thoughtful and often cover breaking developments with real-world insights. These topics cut across all traditions areas of law practice and I give this award in part in recognition that lawyers should no longer think of their niche practice areas as isolated islands that are somehow unaffected by the changes technology is bringing us.

Runner-up – The Inhouse Blog took the runner-up prize in this category for 2013. Since I work as an in-house counsel, this blog is a very useful resource with practical information, links, news and developments relevant to in-house counsel. Highly recommended for anyone who is an in-house counsel, wants to be an in-house counsel or wants to work better with in-house counsel.

3. Best Law Practice Management Blog – Adam Smith, Esq.

The Adam Smith, Esq. blog has long been the gold standard in analytical study of the practice of law, with an emphasis on legal economics. The blog usually focuses on so-called BigLaw issues, but there is much to be learned for firms of all sizes. The blog also does the occasional longer, multi-part thought pieces that are well worth your time and attention.

Runner-up – Allison Shields’ LegalEase Blog. I know that Allison had to spend time away from her blog this year to write two books with me, but her blog (and email newsletter) have lots of great practical tips. There’s a series of time management tips she’s been writing and I really like her recent experiments with infographics.

4. Best Law-related Blog Category – Law Librarian Blogs

I use this category annually to highlight the blogs written by law librarians, a category that I don’t think gets enough attention. These blogs are places to find great information, help for finding information, links to great resources and just plain interesting insights into topics like knowledge management and our changing world of information. If you want to try just one, Sabrina Pacifici’s BeSpacific Blog provides a steady stream of links to great US government and other information. The Law Librarian Blog is a great starting place and there’s a great list of law library blogs here.

Runner-up – Non-US Law-related Blogs – I also use this category to remind people that blawgging is a global phenomenon. As longtime readers know, I’m a huge fan of Canadian bloggers. As I’ve said before, “If you only have US blogs on your reading list, you need to go global.” Diversity is a good thing. Why not start in Canada? The annual Clawbie awards will give you a starter list. In the UK, I especially like the Legal Futures Blog.

5. The Kennedy-Mighell Report Best Legal Podcast – The Return of the Legal Talk Network

I name this category after the podcast Tom Mighell and I do, since I can’t really give it the best podcast award without causing much eye-rolling from Tom. Last year, we thought the Legal Talk Network was finished, but it was resurrected by the great people at Lawgical and I’m thrilled that LTN is again a vibrant resource for legal and law-related podcasts.Lots of choices. If you have not tried listening to podcasts, the Legal Talk Network gives you a great place to start. Try out a few of them.

6. The Sherry Fowler Best Writing on a Blawg Award – Sharon Nelson’s Ride the Lightning

I’m a big fan of the pure writing ability of some of the best blawggers. I named this award after the legal blogger who had the biggest influence on my blog writing, Sherry “Scheherezade” Fowler (who hasn’t been a lawyer blogger for many years). This is my favorite of the Blawggies, my most-opinionated award, and the one I historically get most criticized for. The bottom line: I like the writing I like.

As I was thinking about this award, I started thinking about how much I enjoy reading Sharon Nelson’s Ride the Lightning blog on a regular basis. Sometimes when you have known someone for a long time and are friends with them, you tend to take for granted how good their work really is. Sharon’s an excellent wrier and her blog captures her voice so well. Blog pioneer, Dave Winer, has defined a blog as “the unedited voice of a person.” Sharon encapsulate that notion well. It’s time to recognize that.

Runner-up – Jane Genova’s Law and More – Topical, opinionated, wide-ranging, thoughtful and well-written, the Law and More blog is one that I just enjoy reading every day. I like the way Jane addresses issues like alcoholism, depression, burnout and other things that many lawyers like to avoid.

Special Mention – Pinhawk Law Technology Daily Digest – Although technically not a blog, Jeff Brandt’s daily email newsletter selects three or four worthy blog posts and summarizes them in a pithy, witty and engaging style. Jeff also illustrates Dave Winer’s idea that a blog is the “unedited voice of a person.” We all get too much email, but this is an email newsletter that you won’t mind at all in in your inbox.

7. Best Law Professor Blog – Legal Skills Prof Blog

Although, I’m nominally a contributing editor of the Legal Skills Prof Blog, I’m way more a reader than a contributor. As the debate about the future of legal education started to take hod in 2013 and gain momentum, the “practical skills” approach started to get a lot of attention. THis blog’s coverage of those issues was excellent and it’s a great place to keep up-to-date on discussions about the future of legal education, analysis of current trends, and generally help links and information.

Runner-up – Paul Caron’s The TaxProf Blog What more can I say than that this blog covers tax topics in such an interesting way that I want to read every post. My greatest compliment: reading this blog makes me want to take a class from Paul. I hope he’s thinking about doing some online courses.

8. The DennisKennedy.Blog Best Legal Technology Blog – V. Mary Abraham’s Above and Beyond KM

[Note: I used to give my own blog this award every year, in part because of the attribution issue I talk about in this post and in part because I thought some of my blogging friends got a laugh out of it. They did, but others didn't, and, instead, I started the tradition of naming the award for my blog rather than having my blog win it. I still get some criticism for that, and my friends laugh even more at that. Or maybe they just like to laugh at me.]

Legal technology takes many forms and covers a wide rage of areas. This category’s winner, V. Mary Abraham’s Above and Beyond KM, covers an area I’ve long been interested in gaining more expertise – knowledge management. Interest in legal KM has ebbed and flowed over the years, but it seems to be gathering attention, especially as we start to enter the realm of Big Data. I find that I look to Mary’s blog for thoughtful commentary and her always excellent notes on presentations she attends. It’s a niche topic, but also one that has broader insights and principles.

Runner-up – Law Technology Today OK, I’ll admit that this blog is one that I post to on a once-a-month basis, but I really like what Josh Poje and his team are doing with this blog. If Above and Beyond KM is an example of a niche legal tech blog, Law Technology Today is a great example of a practical, general audience legal tech blog. Lots of great practical advice, often from well-known legal tech writers.

9. Best New Blawg – Jerry Lawson’s NetLawTools

I’m kind of cheating in this category, but you’ll see the reason for my selection. Jerry Lawson is one of the true Internet pioneers among lawyers. I had the chance to write a regular column with Jerry on Internet marketing more than ten years ago. Jerry is the one who first noticed that I had written that blogs might be a great thing for lawyers about two years before I actually got around to starting my blog. In 2013, I noticed that Jerry had started posting to his blog again after a long absence. It’s so great to have his voice and insights back on a regular basis that I knew that I had to give him this award, even if I had to change the rules. Then I realized that I made up all the rules and can do whatever I want. It is very welcome news to see that Jerry is back to writing regularly and I highly recommend you check out his blog.

10. Best Blawg Aggregator – Tie: TechnoLawyer’s BlawgWorld; Pinhawk Law Technology Daily Digest

Two different approaches to keep up with legal tech and law practice management blogs and other posts related to the legal profession. If you read DennisKennedy.Blog, then you should be (and probably already are) a member of Neil Squillante’s excellent TechnoLawyer community, with its great set of resources on legal tech, marking and management. TechnoLawyer’s BlawgWorld is a weekly email newsletter that uses human editors to cull out usedul blog posts and other materials. They say, “Week after week, BlawgWorld provides you with everything you need from the legal Web but nothing you don’t.” The Pinhawk Law Technology Daily Digest is a daily email newsletter in which Jeff Brandt highlights three or four blawg posts on legal tech and summarizes and comments on them in his perceptive, concise and often witty way. His eye for selection is also great and I usually find myself checking out a few of the linked posts everyday.

And there you have it – the 2013 Blawggie Awards.

I wish I could give awards to all the blawgs (and blogs) I like, but this post is already long enough (another Blawggie tradition). Once again, I encourage you to create your own awards (although I’d prefer that you not call them Blawggies – that makes me feel that you don’t read my blog).

When it really comes down to it, the Blawggies are really my way of saying thank you to the blawgs I enjoy most. There are times when blogging can seem like a thankless pursuit, so remember that all bloggers welcome a thank you from readers from time to time.

Some Background on the Blawggies.

The Blawggies are not based on any popular votes, surveys or, God forbid, objective criteria. They are highly-opinionated choices made by me alone, based on my experience, expertise and likes and dislikes gained from nearly ten years of blogging and from reading blogs voraciously for a good number of years before that.

The reactions to the Blawggies have traditionally run the gamut from “who does this guy think he is?” to “if he’s so smart about blawgs, why didn’t he give my blawg an award?” to “who is Dennis Kennedy?”

I used to get some criticism for giving myself awards or naming awards after me on this list (in fact, I still do), but, as I’ve explained before, most of the reason for that stems from my longtime experience of seeing lists I made republished without attribution or linkbacks. Adding myself to the list is a way to make sure that someone finds his or her way back to my work if the list is “repurposed.”

I’ve always wanted to do three things with the Blawggie awards:

1. To highlight the law-related blogs I read and like and to say thank you to those who write them.

2. To direct my readers to the law-related blogs I enjoy.

3. To prompt others to give their own awards so I can learn about other blogs I should be reading.

From the beginning, I expected that many bloggers would pick up on the idea and write their own awards posts. After all, there is no barrier to entry for posting your own awards. I thought that I could then get great recommendations for blogs to add to my reading list from other awards posts in much the same way you can get great recommendations for new music to listen to from the “best of the year” posts by music bloggers that appear at this time of year.

As I’ve said before, “When you realize that there is no reason that you can’t simply post your own awards, you move you from merely blogging to becoming a Blogger with a capital ‘B.’”

The best response to my list is to post your own list, although I do invite your comments and discussion about my list.

The Blawggie-winning Criteria.

I like blogs with (1) consistently useful content, (2) a generous and helpful approach, and (3) a combination of commitment, personality and talent, with an emphasis on good writing. In other words, I like blogs that compel me to read them on a regular basis.

The awards necessarily reflect my many biases and personal preferences, which are far too numerous to list here.

It’s very important to remember that the awards also reflect the blawgs I actually read. While I read a lot of law-related blogs, the number of blawgs I read continues to decrease and the number of non-law-related blogs I read increases. Also, the blawgs I do read are concentrated in my areas of interest and day-to-day focus.

I’m a transactional lawyer, who focuses on information technology law, legal technology and law practice management issues. For better or worse, I’m simply not familiar with most litigation-oriented, criminal defense, regulatory or other specialized blogs. You get the idea.

A Word about the Name “Blawggies.”

Among the historic documents of law-related blogging are a series of emails in which Denise Howell (@dhowell), blogging pioneer and coiner of the term “blawg,” and I had on the question whether “Blawggies” (as well as “blawgger” and “blawgging”) should be spelled with one or two “gs”. As a result, I’m pretty confident of the correct spelling, although I’m seeing more of the single “g” approach lately.

I use the word “blawg” in the sense of “law-related blogs.” I find “lawyer blogs” or “legal blogs” to be limiting and inaccurate for what I want to cover.

All best wishes for 2014.

Dennis

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Creating a LinkedIn Action Plan

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

It’s nice to see LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, Second Edition in the Best Sellers section of the ABA Web Store. A big thank you to readers of this blog who have bought the book.

If you’d like to get a good idea of what’s in the book, the Law Technology Today blog has made available a generous excerpt from the book in a post called Create a LinkedIn Action Plan, courtesy of Lindsay Dawson, whose assistance with getting the word out on our books has been invaluable.

The excerpt comes from the concluding chapter of the book and outlines the three essential building blocks of LinkedIn (Profile, Connections and Participation) and gives three practical action steps, one for each building block. The action steps are simple, concrete actions you can take that require a small investment of time and should improve your results from LinkedIn.

Let me excerpt a bit of that excerpt:

1. Profile.

Your Profile Action Step

Reread and rewrite your Profile summary so that it has an external focus, telling readers exactly what you want them to know about you so that they will want to connect with you.

2. Connections.

Your Connections Action Step

Try to set and reach a reasonable goal for your total number of Con­nections. Reaching fifty Connections will help your Profile strength.

3. Participation.

Your Participation Action Step

Try to post at least one Update per week for a month. Building relation­ships takes time, whether in person or online. Use LinkedIn to identify and gain information about people you have just met or will be meeting, and keep using it to strengthen relationships and expand your network.

There’s more in the post on Law Technology Today.

I’ve really enjoyed getting the chance to speak about what’s in the book on podcasts and webinars recently, but have especially enjoyed spending some one-on-one time helping people improve their approach to LinkedIn, several of whom were not lawyers. Which leads to the question: “What if there were a version of this book not targeted at lawyers and other legal professionals?” Allison and I have heard that question a lot and all I can say is stay tuned for our answer to that question, which will be revealed soon.

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, Second Edition can be purchased through the ABA Store or in an iBook version on iTunes.LIOHFL2 Cover

- Dennis Kennedy

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Upcoming Webinar: The Why and How of LinkedIn for Law Students

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

On Thursday, November 7, I’ll be part of a great panel with Jan Wallen and Ruth Carter for a free webinar called “The Why and How of LinkedIn for Law Students,” presented by LexisNexis as part of its Law Student Webcasts series. Register here.

Description:

On Thursday November 7th at 3 PM EST a panel of LinkedIn experts, including two attorneys who are currently using LinkedIn in their practices, will present to law students on the uses of LinkedIn. You’ll learn why it is important for law students to have a professional presence on LinkedIn and how to set-up your profile and start networking.

You’ll be able to interact with a panel of LinkedIn experts:

1. Learn the nuts and bolts of LinkedIn from Jan Wallen, who literally wrote the book on it: “Mastering LinkedIn in 7 Days or Less”: http://bit.ly/1aC8mFr

2. Hear how LinkedIn is applicable to the legal profession from Dennis Kennedy, Vice President and Counsel MasterCard, who writes the technology column for the ABA Journal: http://bit.ly/1aC8mFt

3. See how LinkedIn is being used in the practice of law from Ruth Carter, owner of Carter Law Firm, who was selected to the ABA list of Legal Rebels in 2012: http://bit.ly/1aC8mp3

BTW – all webcast attendees receive special discounts on the LinkedIn books/ebooks published by Jan and Dennis.

There’s also more information at the LexisNexis 4 Law Students Facebook page.

There have already been a large number of registrations, but there’s plenty of room for more.

I really enjoy talking with law students and am looking forward to this webinar. We have a lot of great information to share. If you know law students who might benefit from learning more about LinkedIn, please let them know about this webinar.

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, Second Edition

This webinar helps Allison Shields and I with the launch of our new book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, Second Edition. We think the book will be especially useful for law students.

The second edition of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, Second Edition can be purchased through the ABA Store or in an iBook version on iTunes.

- Dennis Kennedy

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Upcoming Webinar: LinkedIn for Lawyers Reloaded

Tuesday, October 15th, 2013

On Thursday, October 17, Allison Shields and I will be presenting a webinar called LinkedIn for Lawyers Reloaded, cosponsored by ALI CLE and the ABA’s Law Practice Division.

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, Second Edition

This 90 minute seminar coincides with the launch of our new book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, Second Edition, and attendees of the live webinar will receive an electronic version of the book.

Our presentation will be based on the new version of our book and will reflect our current thinking about LinkedIn and will cover recent changes to LinkedIn’s interface and features. Allison and I spoke today in preparation for the webinar and I’m excited about our newest approach to this material.

Here’s the description for the webinar:

Like many lawyers (and 225 million other LinkedIn users), you may have a profile on LinkedIn, but do you really know what to do with it? Beyond putting up an online “resumé” and adding connections to your professional network, do you know all the ways that LinkedIn can help you in your career?

In this essential CLE program on LinkedIn for Lawyers, learn how to leverage the world’s largest professional network to boost your own practice and profile! Whether you are a new or long-term user, this CLE program will give you helpful instructions and useful strategies for taking advantage of all of LinkedIn’s features, including navigating LinkedIn’s new interface, maximizing your profile, and connecting with referral sources, former classmates, former practice colleagues, peers, experts, and others, in effective, mutually beneficial ways.

Bonus! All registrants will receive a FREE copy of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (a $49.95 value) In addition, all registrants receive a set of downloadable course materials and free access to the archived online program later. Registrants will be able to view the archived online program on a mobile device.

What You Will Learn

After attending this practical webcast, you will be able to:

+ understand the many ways lawyers use LinkedIn and find the way(s) that work best for you

+ know the “Three Essential Building Blocks” of LinkedIn and how to use them to get the most value for the time you spend on LinkedIn

+ design and optimize your LinkedIn profile to create a strong professional social media presence

+ engage LinkedIn in the job search, recruiting, and interviewing process

+ develop focused, strategic approaches to networking with others on LinkedIn

+ use powerful advanced features of LinkedIn that many users are not even aware of

+ take advantage of new features (such as Endorsements), interface changes and mobile applications to take your use of LinkedIn to a new level

+ boost your professional presence and establish your niche among the 225+ million members of the LinkedIn community

Have a question for the faculty? This interactive seminar will give you the opportunity to submit questions to the faculty before and/or during the program. Send your questions to tsquestions@ali-cle.org.

I hope that you will be able to attend LinkedIn for Lawyers Reloaded on Thursday, or, if not, that you will mention it to friends and colleagues who might appreciate the webinar.

The second edition of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers can be purchased through the ABA Store or in an iBook version on iTunes.

- Dennis Kennedy

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

MoBar Lex Port Legal Tech Conference – October 3 & 4

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

If you will be in the St. Louis area on October 3 and 4, there’s a great legal tech conference called Lex Port that the Missouri Bar Association is putting on. In just its second year, Lex Port has a great schedule of programs, national legal tech speakers (Mike Downey, Ben Schorr, Jeff Taylor and Paul Unger), an attractive price, and, I’ve already been told, an impressive number of attendees already registered, I believe doubling the excellent attendance of the inaugural event last year.

Lex Port logo

However, there’s always room for more, and walk-up registration is still possible. Check with the Missouri Bar. We’d like to see you at the conference in St. Charles, Missouri.

The agenda (see details here) is wide-ranging, with lots of great topics, from Microsoft Office programs to ethics to tablet and apps to technology law topics and much more.

I’ll be speaking at three sessions on Friday, October 4:

FACEBOOK IN 50 MINUTES FOR LAWYERS

Facebook has more than 1 BILLION users. What does this mean for lawyers? Is Facebook right for you and your practice? Whether you simply want to know enough about Facebook to advise your clients or you want to jump in or improve your Facebook presence, this practical session will provide you with strategies, lessons and tips for using Facebook to achieve personal and professional goals. You will learn how to decide whether Facebook makes sense for you and your practice, setting up a personal and/or professional presence, dealing with privacy and security settings, and much more.

DEATH, DISABILITY & DIGITAL ESTATE PLANNING

We all now have a growing base of digital “property” – passwords, online accounts, photos and much more. What happens to your digital assets on death or incapacity? Do traditional probate rules and concepts work in the parallel universe of digital property? Who can access online accounts? How do you obtain passwords? How can digital property be accessed and transferred to heirs? How do we prepare for dealing with our increasingly online world? This practical session will look at the issues that have already arisen, future concerns and how laws and lawyers are trying to keep up with online trends.

50 APPS IN 50 MINUTES (with Jeff Taylor and Lucas Boling)

Over 1,000,000 Android Apps, more than 900,000 iPhone and iPad apps, and 130,000+ Windows Phone apps – with so many choices, how do you find apps relevant to your practice and your busy life? You will not want to miss this fast-paced session that highlights 50 of the best apps for the legal professional.

The great people at the Missouri Bar Association always do a great job with conferences and I expect this year’s Lex Port conference to exceed the high standard set by last year’s event.

I hope to see you there. As always, I enjoy meeting readers of this blog. Please feel free to introduce yourself.

- Dennis Kennedy

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available. Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Announcing LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, Second Edition

Monday, September 30th, 2013

Box of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers 2Ed booksA box of books arrived at my door – my copies of the new Second Edition of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers. All of the work on a book project finally seems real and tangible when you get the box of books and hold one in your hands.

Allison Shields and I wrote the original LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers about a year-and-a-half ago. Then we wrote Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, which debuted about a year ago. We didn’t expect that we’d be writing a second edition so soon, but the massive interface and layout changes and feature updates at LinkedIn and the overwhelmingly positive response we got to the book pushed up our target for preparing a new edition.

LinkedIn’s changes continued all through the writing of the new book this summer and took a lot more work than we expected just to keep up with the changes. We also had the chance to incorporate some of our new ideas on LinkedIn, materials from articles and presentations we’ve given, practical tips and techniques Allison uses when she does training on LinkedIn, and discussion of new features.

In other words, the Second Edition of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is a major update and we’re proud of the new version.

Among other things, you’ll find:

    • All new illustrations, reflection the major interface changes.
    • Discussion of new features like Endorsements and a reconsideration of the use of Premium Accounts.
    • Updated material on Company Pages, Ethics, Ads, Mobile Apps and Privacy Settings.
    • Our best new practical ideas and tips for using LinkedIn in effective ways.
  • The book continues to focus on ten “lessons,” provides more detail on some advanced topics like ethics, and includes a generous helping of our favorite 60 LinkedIn tips.

    Here’s the description of the new edition from the ABA’s Web Store:

    Since the first edition of LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers was published, LinkedIn has added almost 100 million users, and more and more lawyers are using the platform on a regular basis. Now, this bestselling ABA book has been fully revised and updated to reflect significant changes to LinkedIn’s layout and functionality made through 2013. LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, Second Edition, will help lawyers make the most of their online professional networking. In just one hour, you will learn to:

    Set up a LinkedIn account

    Create a robust, dynamic profile–and take advantage of new multimedia options

    Build your connections

    Get up to speed on new features such as Endorsements, Influencers, Contacts, and Channels

    Enhance your Company Page with new functionality

    Use search tools to enhance your network

    Monitor your network with ease

    Optimize your settings for privacy concerns

    Use LinkedIn effectively in the hiring process

    Develop a LinkedIn strategy to grow your legal network

    As I write this, the book is still available with a 15% pre-order discount. Since we’ve received our author copies already, I’m going to suggest that you act quickly on the pre-order discount. There was a lot of interest in using the first edition in connection with training classes for lawyers in large firms and corporate law departments and we had that in mind when writing the second edition. If interested in that, please inquire about bulk discounts.

    The order page is here.

    Watch for news coming soon about a second book project.

    On October 17, Allison and I will presenting a webinar called LinkedIn for Lawyers Reloaded, co-sponsored by ALI CLE and the ABA’s Law Practice Division.

    - Dennis Kennedy

    [Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

    View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

    Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

    LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available. Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.