Are Lawyers Ready for Artificial Intelligence?

Tom Mighell and I have had an especially good run of episodes recently on The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast. I especially want to recommend the most recent one “Are Lawyers Ready for Artificial Intelligence?Podcasting portrait

I had been seeing a lot of blog posts, articles, tweets and other mentions of AI, IBM Watson, machine learning and the like. I wanted to talk about it on the podcast. I had to convince Tom that we had something to add to the conversation. As usual, he did’t think he’d have much to say. And, as usual, when he says that, we have some of our longer episodes.

In a way, it was a perfect topic. I like topics where I can push Tom to react to some of my wildest ideas and we both start to see practical opportunities. This episode will also be known by us as the one where I left Tom speechless with one of my ideas.

There’s some interesting stuff in this podcast and I encourage you to listen to it and to subscribe to the podcast.

Here’s the show summary:

“Artificial Intelligence is a means of designing a system that can perceive its environment and take actions that will maximize its success.” -Tom Mighell

Developments in Big Data, machine learning, IBM Watson, and other advancements in technology have brought back the cyclical discussion of what artificial intelligence might mean for lawyers. Has anything really changed, or have we just reached another round of the AI debate?

In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell analyze recent discussions about artificial intelligence and lawyers, try to separate myth from reality, and ponder whether AI can take over the work of lawyers. Together, they discuss the definition of AI, robotics, Technology Assisted Review, driverless cars, document assembly software, LegalZoom and how lawyers are assisted or threatened by these technologies. Dennis points out that lawyers are often worried about computer system mistakes but comfortable with the lower success rate of humans. Tom aptly explains that comfort in certain technologies stems from psychological acceptance.

In the second half of the podcast, Dennis and Tom revisit traveling with technology. As Dennis was just in Europe, and Tom is headed there soon, they talk about wireless routers, mobile wifi, headphones, phone chargers, backpacks, and the other various technology necessities to bring on your vacation. As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation you can use the second the podcast ends.

In the “B segment” of our next episode, which will be released soon, Tom and I revisited the topic of AI and Tom challenged me to come up with practical examples of the ways lawyers might use AI. I think even Tom will (grudgingly) admit that I won that challenge. Be sure to tune in to that episode.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

ABA TECHSHOW 2015 – A Few Reflections

Another ABA TECHSHOW (#ABATECHSHOW) blazed by and I barely have had time to catch my breath afterward. I also had little time to catch my breath at the show – it was a whirlwind.Podcasting portrait

The good news is that Tom Mighell and I captured our reflections on TECHSHOW in an episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast called, perhaps somewhat vaguely, “Dennis and Tom Go to ABA TECHSHOW,” which is the best place to get my thoughts on the show.

No surprise – I had a great time, met lots of old and new friends, had some great conversations, saw some interesting new products, learned a few new things and had some new ideas and potential projects. And I got to spend a lot of time hanging out with the great people at the Legal Talk Network (you know who you are).

At the end, I counted up that I had done three presentations, co-hosted a podcast, guested on a podcast, was on the critic’s panel for an Appathon, went to a Chicago legal tech meetup, had some great dinners and even found time for a trip to the Chicago Art Institute to visit some of my favorite Brancusi sculptures. I certainly got my money’s worth of that trip to Chicago.

If you use the hashtag #ABATECHSHOW, you can still find lots of great links to resources, photos and more.

I presented on the 60 Sites in 60 Minutes panel this year (I played the role of the serious one) – a first for me – and the list of the 60 or so sites is posted here. The whole notion of “sites” is an interesting one – some of my selections played with whole notion of what a “site” was anymore and whether the term still made sense.

I invite you to take a listen to the podcast episode. And I’ll hope to see you at TECHSHOW 2016 next year.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Reconsidering Speech Recognition

I’ve been thinking lately about whether changes in technology should be causing us revisit ideas and approaches that we have tossed aside or put on the back burner for many years. In simplest terms, the question would be if high-speed Internet connections, mobile access, processor power, memory, storage and the Cloud now make it possible for us to do some of the things we’ve talked about for many years, but that never quite worked.

TKMR Logo

Another way to pose the question is to ask whether you have started to notice that things that never quite worked are now starting to work noticeable better.

I ran these questions by my legal tech friends Tom Mighell and Marc Lauritsen a while back and found out that they had been thinking about the same thing.

That gave Tom and I the idea to try to do an series of occasional podcasts on the The Kennedy-Mighell Report in which we would revisit some “old” technology ideas that people haven’t thought about for a while and see if new developments have made them more possible or things we should reconsider or even implement.

In our first episode in this series, Revisiting Technology: Speech Recognition, we start with speech recognition, a technology that seemed to never quite get to where we wanted it over many years and tended to ultimately disappoint.

I had noticed that I had been using dictation on my mobile phones for short emails and texts. I’m not a great typist on mobile phones, so I’ve been pleasantly surprised how useful and accurate speech recognition has become.

It turns out that speech recognition is a perfect example of how technology change has refreshed the potential of an old standard, and, in the podcast, Tom and I delve into changes in speech recognition and our new perspectives on it.

It’s a lively conversation and we invite you to listen to the podcast. We also encourage you to share your thoughts. We’d also like to hear your ideas for other topics in this series.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Must-have Apps for Lawyers – My New ABA Journal Column

My latest “Kennedy on Tech” ABA journal column is my attempt to answer a question I frequently hear from lawyers – “What mobile apps should I have?”

ABAJ Column - Feb 2015

One of the things that intrigues me most about our new world of apps is how personalized each of our experiences using tech, especially mobile devices, has become. The apps that I like might not be the ones you like. The apps I use most might well be apps you don’t even use. It becomes more difficult than ever to compare what I’m seeing on my screens to what you are seeing on your screens.

As a result, I find that lists of “best” apps or even app reviews to be somewhat unhelpful for me.

In my new column, the title largely reveals my point of view: “Which apps are must-haves? It depends on your practice.”

In the article, I set out a framework for you to use when considering what mobile apps might work best for you.

I divided apps into four categories:

  1. Apps for programs you already use.
  2. Apps for convenience.
  3. Apps for how you work.
  4. The elusive “other” types of apps.

The money quote:

There are plenty of useful apps out there, especially if you take a step back and think about how you practice, how you use mobile devices and the intersection of the two.

Mobile apps are especially good for three things: allowing you to perform tasks anywhere and at any time, extending the range of what you can do with computer programs or Web services, and taking advantage of the features of a mobile device (camera, microphone, sensors) to give you new tools right at hand.

As always, I like to hear what you think of these columns. Let me know. Longtime column readers will notice that the column has a new photo of me.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

52 Books in 52 Weeks – 2015

For the last few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

Facebook book with box

Last year, I read 58 books, 6 more than in 2013. Or, more accurately, I listed 58 books that I read. I “read” many business books in the form of getAbstract summaries and I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on.

I’m doing the same thing in 2015. My approach is the same in previous years – I’ll simply update this post from time to time sporadically throughout the year as I finish books.

I’ve noticed that I tend to read all or most of a series or two of books each year. Last year, they were Robert van Gulik’s Judge Dee mysteries and Louise Penny’s Inspector Gamache series.

I’ve enjoyed doing this challenge every year and hope you find the list useful. And I encourage you to take the challenge yourself.

I welcome your recommendations of good books I might read this year.

As Bill Taylor says, “Are you learning as fast as the world is changing?” Challenging yourself to read 52 books is probably a good way to start to answer that question.

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

25. All the Old Knives, Olen Steinhauer
24. Becoming Steve Jobs, Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli
23. Data and Goliath, Bruce Schneier
22. How to Do More in Less Time, Allison Shields and Dan Siegel
21. John Robison, Be Different

May

20. Dry Bones, Craig Johnson
19. The Lady from Zagreb, Philip Kerr
18. Howard Pyle’s Book of Pirates, Howard Pyle
17. Treasure Island, Robert Louis Stevenson
16. 1177, The Year Civilization Collapsed, Eric Cline

April

15. The Republic of Pirates, Colin Woodward
14. Flash Points, George Friedmann
13. The Organized Mind, Daniel Levitin
12. The Geneva Strategy, Jamie Freveletti
11. Retribution, David Hagberg

March

10. Slim by Design, Brian Wansink
9. Twelve Days, Alex Berenson
8. Waking Up, Sam Harris
7. Zero to One, Peter Thiel
6. The Journal of Best Practices, David Finch

February

5. Austria, Culture Smart
4. Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, Think Like a Freak
3. The Resilience Dividend, Judith Rodin

January

2. Ada’s Algorithm, James Essinger
1. The Lean Startup, Eric Ries

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.