GC Research Club Interview about Legal Technology

William Barns Graham at the GC Research Club interviewed me a while back about technology as it relates to in-house counsel, some of my uses of technology, collaboration and other topics. The interview originally ran in two parts, but has been collected conveniently in one place, as “GCRC Interview: Dennis Kennedy, Vice President, Counsel at MasterCard Worldwide – Whole Interview” on the GCResearchClub.com website, along with other interviews, all of which I would recommend. It’s nice to be able to reach an international audience with this interview.

Ann Page, in her “JANUARY 2014 REPORT – Legal Department Technological Solutions – What To Consider and Where To Start?“, highlighted a quote from the interview:

Because legal work is so collaborative, there’s a push to use new collaborative technologies, communication technologies and specialized practice technologies on an ongoing basis. We’ve still yet to get much past breaking the surface of analytical, automation and knowledge management tools.

In the interview, I talked about:

  • How my experience in law and technology complement each other
  • What technologies in-house counsel can use to better align their work to the demands of their employees
  • Whether lawyers and IT departments work well enough together
  • How big “cyberlaw” might become
  • Some of the technologies I personally use
  • Useful phone and tablet apps for lawyers

I had fun doing the interview and had fun re-reading it the other day. You might also find the interview worth your time and effort, especially if you are an in-house counsel or work with in-house counsel.

Let me know what you think.

Link to full interview.

LIOHFL 2ed Image

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Happy Eleventh Birthday to DennisKennedy.Blog

Birthday Cake with PineappleEleven years ago today, with an allusion to Babylon 5 and the ideas that I needed to produce my own RSS feed and experiment with new types of writing, I launched this blog. I called the blog simply DennisKennedy.Blog.

Much has happened with me and this blog over those eleven years. I appreciate the positive responses my blog has always seemed to generate, the many doors it has opened and the great people it has introduced me to.

One of the most interesting criticisms I’ve consistently gotten over the years is that I have a tendency to anthropomorphize my blog. I think that criticism is somewhat overstated. My blog, on the other hand, thinks that criticism is, well, just crazy talk.

Earlier today, my blog and I were discussing where things stood at the 11-year mark. I mentioned that I had been feeling that I hadn’t been paying the blog as much attention as I wanted over the past year or so, even though my intentions were good. In my defense, I noted that it wasn’t like I wasn’t doing any else in my limited spare time – two new books, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition) and LinkedIn in One Hour, the Kennedy-Mighell Report Podcast (the 120th episode – on living in multiple tech worlds – just released), my ABA Journal tech column (the February column is on social media), speaking (e.g., at the upcoming 2014 ABA TECHSHOW) and webinars (e.g., the upcoming one on Top Tech Trends), the occasional article or interview, helping build the ABA’s Legal Technology Resource Center (check out the 2013 Tech Report) and Law Technology Today blog, and dabbling in social media. Not to forget the 10th edition of the Blawggie Awards.

That was not the best approach to take with a blog that was already feeling a little neglected.

I certainly got an earful from my blog – most of which would be unprintable – and the stinging and memorable comment that my blog felt it might as well write its own posts rather than wait on me. Message heard and understood. As they say, that opened up the communication channel and we discussed the future direction of the blog, put together an action plan, and made up in time to have some blawgiversary cake.

The plan is to redesign and revamp the website, with my blog becoming even more so the main focus of the site. That will take care of a current bug that affects the ability of users of some browsers to see new blog posts – the best way to read this blog for now is by subscribing to its RSS feed). The other content of the website will be drastically streamlined and updated, all with the idea of making it easier to access all the different things I’m doing, no matter where they are located.

This plan certainly made my blog happier – and me too. I’m talking with my web designer about the path forward and a timeline.

In the meantime, I’d certainly welcome any suggestions readers might have about revamping the site, especially portions that you want to see retained and brought up-to-date. I’m also curious whether there might be interest in a free ebook version of the entire blog archive. Let me know.

It’s been eleven great years. My blog and I hope to keep it going for many more. Thanks for being a great audience.

- Dennis and DennisKennedy.Blog

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

52 Books in 52 Weeks – 2014

For the last few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

Last year, I read exactly 52 books. Or, more accurately, I listed exactly 52 books that I read. I “read” many business books in the form of getAbstract summaries and I don’t list books that might reveal certain things I might (or might not) be working on. 2013 was an unusual year for me, too, in the significant number of books I started and gave up on before finishing.

I’m doing the same thing in 2014. My approach is the same in previous years – I’ll simply update this post from time to time sporadically throughout the year as I finish books.

I’ve enjoyed doing this challenge every year and hope you find the list useful. And I encourage you to take the challenge yourself.

As Bill Taylor says, “Are you learning as fast as the world is changing?” Challenging yourself to read 52 books is probably a good way to start to answer that question.

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

27. Jony Ive, Leander Kahney

May

26. Any Other Name, Craig Johnson
25. Soccer in Sun and Shadow, Eduardo Galeano
24. How to be Danish, Patrick Kingsley
23. Pitch Perfect, Bill McGowan
22. A Short Guide to a Long Life, David Agus
21. George Washington’s Secret Six, Brian Kilmeade
20. The Janson Option, Paul Garrison
19. The Vikings, Neil Oliver

April

18. The Haunted Monastery, Robert Van Gulik
17. Night Work, Laurie R. King
16. Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon, Brad Stone
15. The Mongolian Conspiracy, Rafael Bernal

March

14. The Bourne Retribution, Eric Van Lustbader
13. Judge Dee at Work, Robert Van Gulik
12. Wild Fermentation, Sandor Ellix Katz

February

11. The Chinese Lake Murders, Robert Van Gulik
10. The Chinese Gold Murders, Robert Van Gulik
9. Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee, Robert Van Gulik

January

8. How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big, Scott Adams
7. Europe Between the Oceans, Barry Cunliffe
6. Feldenkrais:The Busy Person’s Guide to Easier Movement, Frank Wildman
5. A Short History of the Twentieth Century, John Lukacs
4. Spirit of Steamboat, Craig Johnson
3. A Man Without Breath, Philip Kerr
2. A Cook’s Tour, Anthony Bourdain
1. Italian Ways, Tim Parks

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Celebrating the Tenth Blawgiversary of DennisKennedy.Blog

Ten years ago (February 15, 2003), I launched this blog and it’s striking how much that has happened to me since can be traced to this blog.

The original post started with a reference to my favorite science fiction TV series, Babylon 5, and said:

And so it begins . . .

I realized the other day that I had first written about blogs well over a year ago. In fact, the rise of blogs was one of my 2002 predictions for legal technology in my annual legal tech predictions article. As I was working on updating my web site (http://www.denniskennedy.com), I finally decided that I had to have my own blog. Thanks to people like Jerry Lawson, Sabrina Pacifici, the Support Forum at MovableType.org, it’s finally here.

This blog, which I named DennisKennedy.Blog, was my early birthday present to myself in 2003 (my birthday is actually in two days, on the 17th). I saw it as a place to experiment with my writing and the best way to generate my own RSS feed (the feed was something I wanted much more than just a “blog” and blogging software was the easiest way to generate an RSS feed). Both of those reasons remain true today.

I also remember how, at the time, I had the feeling that whole blog thing had already happened and that I’d missed it. I’m always surprised by how much time it took me after I had started speaking and writing about blogs to launch my own blog.

One of the annual traditions on this blog is to have an extravagant blawgiversary (or blogiversary) celebration. Another thing I tend to do (which some have even criticized me for – little do they understand how close you can get to a blog after a few years) is to anthromorphize this blog.

I mention both things, because my blog has made it clear that it wants just a low-key, stay at home, no presents please blawgiversary for number 10. The blog is feeling a little introspective and contemplative on this occasion, as am I.

I will say, on my blog’s behalf, that it’s been a great ten years and we look forward to many more. There are so many people to thank and we appreciate all the readers over the years, especially those who have been reading since the beginning. We also want to give a big welcome to new readers.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

52 Books in 52 Weeks – 2013

For the last few years, I’ve enjoyed reading the posts of several bloggers who are trying to read 52 books in 52 weeks. I’ve also wanted to find a good way for me to keep track of the books I’ve read. And it gives me a good reading target to shoot for.

Last year, I read 56 books.

I’m doing the same thing in 2013. My approach is the same in previous years – I’ll simply update this post from time to time throughout the year as I finish books.

I’ve enjoyed doing this challenge every year and hope you find the list useful. And I encourage you to take the challenge yourself.

As Bill Taylor says, “Are you learning as fast as the world is changing?” Challenging yourself to read 52 books is probably a good way to start to answer that question.

December

52. Becoming a Supple Leopard, Kelly Starrett
51. Seeing What Others Don’t, Gary Klein
50. Decisive, Chip Heath and Dan Heath
49. The Lawyer’s Field Guide to Effective Business Development, William Flannery
48. The Sports Gene, David Epstein
47. Learnings from the Long View, Peter Schwartz
46. The United States of Paranoia, Jesse Walker

November

45. The Legal Side of Blogging: How Not to get Sued, Fired, Arrested, or Killed, Ruth Carter
44. The Investigator, Terry Lenzner
43. The English Girl, Daniel Silva
42. Sleepless in Hollywood, Lynda Obst
41. The Flamethrowers, Rachel Kushner
40. Beloved Enemy, Eric Lustbader

October

39. Slow Getting Up, Nate Jackson
38. The Art of Thinking Clearly, Rolf Dobelli
37. Letter to a A Young Scientist, Edward O. Wilson
36. The Consummata, Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins
35. The Map of Innovation, Kevin O’Connor

September

34. WordPress Websites in One Hour for Lawyers, Jennifer Ellis
33. Big Data, Viktor Mayer-Schonberger and Kenneth Cukier
32. Lawn Gone, Pam Penick

August

31. Tea Lover’s Treasury, James Norwood Pratt
30. Revolutionary Summer, Joseph Ellis
29. The Shanghai Factor, Charles McCarry

July

28. A Serpent’s Tooth, Craig Johnson
27. Seven Daughters of Eve, Bryan Sykes

June

26. Foreign Influence, Brad Thor
25. Psych’s Guide to Crime Fighting for the Totally Unqualified, Shawn Spencer and Burton Guster
24. The Expats, Chris Pavone
23. The Signal and the Noise, Nat Silver

May

22. Frozen Heat, Richard Castle
21. How Georgia Became O;Keeffe, Karen Karbo
20. Dreamland, David Randall
19. Microsoft SharePoint 2010 for Dummies, Vanessa Williams

April

18. Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes, Maria Konnikova
17. The Utopia Experimment, Kyle Mills
16. The Aden Effect, Claude Berube

March

15. The March of Folly, Barbara Tuchman
14. The Aden Effect, Claude Berube
13. iPad in One Hour for Lawyers, Tom Mighell
12. Why Grow That When You Can Grow This, Andrew Keys
11. Mission to Paris, Alan Furst

February

10. Among the Islands, Tim Flannery
9. Spy the Lie, Philip Houston, Michael Floyd and Susan Carnicero
8. Yoga for People Who Can’t Be Bothered to Do It, Geoff Dyer
7. Garment of Shadows, Laurie R. King

January

6. Naked Heat, Richard Castle
5. Heat Wave, Richard Castle
4. Trust Me I’m Lying, Ryan Holiday
3. Death Without Company, Craig Johnson
2. How Music Works, David Byrne
1. Bruce, Peter Ames Carlin

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.