Technology-Lawyer

Dennis Kennedy

Technology Law and Legal Technology. Dennis Kennedy is one of the few technology lawyers who is also an expert on the underlying technologies. Dennis an award-winning leader in the application of technology and the Internet to the practice of law. DennisKennedy.com gives you access to a wide variety of Dennis Kennedy's resources on legal technology, his writings, his well-known blog, DennisKennedy.Blog, and information about how you can have Dennis speak to your organization or group.

Dennis Kennedy is one of the most knowledgeable legal technologists you will find. - Michael Arkfeld.

Dennis Kennedy, a lawyer and legal technology expert in St. Louis, Mo., has been a significant influence in the ever-evolving relationship between lawyers and the Web. - Robert Ambrogi

Archive for the ‘Questions’ Category

GC Research Club Interview about Legal Technology

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

William Barns Graham at the GC Research Club interviewed me a while back about technology as it relates to in-house counsel, some of my uses of technology, collaboration and other topics. The interview originally ran in two parts, but has been collected conveniently in one place, as “GCRC Interview: Dennis Kennedy, Vice President, Counsel at MasterCard Worldwide – Whole Interview” on the GCResearchClub.com website, along with other interviews, all of which I would recommend. It’s nice to be able to reach an international audience with this interview.

Ann Page, in her “JANUARY 2014 REPORT – Legal Department Technological Solutions – What To Consider and Where To Start?“, highlighted a quote from the interview:

Because legal work is so collaborative, there’s a push to use new collaborative technologies, communication technologies and specialized practice technologies on an ongoing basis. We’ve still yet to get much past breaking the surface of analytical, automation and knowledge management tools.

In the interview, I talked about:

  • How my experience in law and technology complement each other
  • What technologies in-house counsel can use to better align their work to the demands of their employees
  • Whether lawyers and IT departments work well enough together
  • How big “cyberlaw” might become
  • Some of the technologies I personally use
  • Useful phone and tablet apps for lawyers

I had fun doing the interview and had fun re-reading it the other day. You might also find the interview worth your time and effort, especially if you are an in-house counsel or work with in-house counsel.

Let me know what you think.

Link to full interview.

LIOHFL 2ed Image

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version also available). Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

When Will the Next Episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Podcast Appear?

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013

[Note: I’m going to continue running a Q&A series at through through January (and maybe much longer) on DennisKennedy.Blog. Details on how to submit your questions to me may be found at the end of this post.]

I am a fan of both your column and your podcast with Tom Mighell. I seem to recall that you and Tom published your podcast yourselves before moving to the Legal Talk Network. Have you and Tom considered going back to self-publishing the podcast? Alternatively, is there a chance the podcast could find a new home? – Mike Morse

The answer is: Yes, there is a 100% chance the podcast will find a new home.

Let me pre-announce that the Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast (“a podcast on legal technology, with an Internet focus”) will soon return to regular production at its new home – the ABA’s Legal Technology Resource Center. The podcast will be part of what will become a group of legal technology-related podcasts produced by and distributed through the Legal Technology Resource Center.

Tom and I are currently working on the next episode of the podcast, so we expect the relaunch to be soon, tentatively in early January.

There might also be some other announcements related to the podcast coming in the near future.

We were very sad when we learned that the Legal Talk Network had to stop production of our podcast and the other podcasts on the network, but knew that we wanted to continue. As I mentioned in my 2012 Blawggies post, the Legal Talk Network was very important in the history of law-related podcasting and it was an honor and a pleasure to be part of it. Moving to the Legal Technology Resource Center seemed like a perfect fit for us and we are pleased that we could put the relaunch together.

The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast has a long history. Tom and I launched it when we learned that we would be speaking about podcasting at the 2006 ABA TECHSHOW. We produced 6 episodes on our own. I refer to these episodes as the “lost” episodes because they were taken off the Internet and, until recently, neither Tom nor I could find backup copies. Fortunately, Tom recently found copies.

We did 93 episodes for the Legal Talk Network. I consider the episodes as some of my best work and thinking about legal technology, especially the episodes in 2012.

The mathematicians among you will realize that 6 + 93 = 99. We’[ve decided, however, to continue with the numbering of the current podcast and treat the first six as unnumbered “lost” episodes. That means the first episode of the relaunched podcast will be #94, giving us time to put together a special “hundredth show” episode.

We appreciate the patience that listeners and subscribers to the podcast have had as we make this transition, the nice notes we’ve gotten from people like Mike, and all the positive response the podcast has gotten over the years.

If you have suggestions for topics for upcoming podcast episodes or questions for us to answer on the podcast, let us know. The show notes page for the podcast is here. You can still find earlier episodes on the Legal Talk Network website and in iTunes. We expect that iTunes subscribers will not have to do anything to continue to get the new episodes.

If you have a question for me to answer, you may submit it for me through the usual channels – email at denniskennedyblog @ gmail . com, a comment left on the original post about the Q&A series, this post or a subsequent post, or through Twitter (@dkennedyblog), or whatever other way you want to reach me.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

What Tech Gifts Do You Recommend for Techie Lawyers (and Others)?

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012

[Note: I’m running a Q&A series all the rest of December on DennisKennedy.Blog (details here).]

What Tech Gifts Do You Recommend for Techie Lawyers (and Others)?

The answer is: Normally, I don’t make these kinds of recommendations, leaving that task in the excellent hands of people like Reid Trautz, who has posted the latest edition of his annual gift guide for lawyers.

However, there is one item that I see as the must have for techie lawyers, especially those who travel a lot. It’s perfect for all of my friends who speak regularly on legal tech and have so many gadgets and chargers that their hotel rooms look like they are decorated with Christmas lights.

Here it is.

Ok, admit it, I made you laugh. However, I really do think a sleep mask is great for travel.

Before I give me some of my general thoughts, let me recommend the gift guide that Allison Shields posted, which links to a number of tech gift guides, including the 2012 Holiday Tech Toys podcast from Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway, an annual tradition.

Here are a few of my thoughts.

It’s difficult to give (or receive in some cases) tech gifts, especially as tech has become so much more personal. For example, I’m really liking my iPad Mini and would thoroughly recommend it, if it fits your use case. However, giving it as a gift is tricky because the amount of memory that makes sense will vary from person to person. It’s nice to get an iPod, iPad or other device, but if it doesn’t have enough memory or isn’t in the color you want, it’s not quite as nice as you hope it would be. It’s best to determine what your gift recipient really wants, which takes away the surprise element.

Headphones are another example of a tech gift where people have certain ideas and requirements in mind. I have a collections of headphones and earphones, each of which has a specific use. That said, I’ll put in a good word for the MEElectronics M6-BK-MEE Sport Noise-Isolating In-Ear Headphones with Memory Wire that I use when I work out. Great price, good sound and they stay in my ears well and block out music and other sounds in the fitness center where I work out.

I tend to take a practical approach to tech and I think that approach works really well for tech gifts. For the techies on your list, I’d suggest the practical stuff, things like cables, chargers, connectors and the like. You really can never have enough, especially if you speak and travel. External hard drives and higher capacity USB drives will always be appreciated – you can’t have too many.

For the tech speaker on your list, the hottest thing among speakers is using an Apple TV and Airplay so you can present wirelessly with an iPad. They’ll be happy to see an Apple TV.

A gift card to buy some apps is another good idea.

Not surprisingly, I also recommend one or more of the reasonably-priced “In One Hour” books from the ABA’s Law Practice Management Section. I’ve ready many of them and you can pick topics that interest your gift recipient. I especially like the ones of LinkedIn and Facebook, but I might be a little biased.

If you have a question for me to answer in this series, you may submit it for me through the usual channels – email at denniskennedyblog @ gmail . com, a comment left on the original post about the Q&A series, this post or a subsequent post, or through Twitter (@dkennedyblog), or whatever other way you want to reach me.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Would You Explain #gas and #bikeride?

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

[Note: I’m running a Q&A series all the rest of December on DennisKennedy.Blog (details here).]

Would You Explain #gas and #bikeride?

The answer is: Yes, I’d be happy to explain my use of #gas and #bikeride on Twitter and Facebook. They are good examples of what are known as hashtags.

If you follow me on Twitter (@denniskennedy) or are a Friend of mine on Facebook (you know who you are), you will occasionally see updates from me that look like:

#gas – Webster Groves, MO Circle K – $2.95, regular

or

#bikeride – today, 15 miles

I’ve been doing this for several years, as I’ll explain, as a Twitter experiment. They all start out as tweets on Twitter. After I linked my Facebook account to Twitter, they are automatically posted to Facebook as updates as soon as I tweet them on Twitter.

So, what do they mean?

First, we need to talk about “hashtags.” Hashtags are a Twitter phenomenon, although they are used in other places as well. See the Wikipedia explanation of hashtags.

Hashtags serve several purposes. I’ll illustrate this using Twitter as my example.

The most interesting purpose, at least to me, is they represent a form of self-organization to facilitate the search of tweets and an informal form of tagging. People found that if they put a # symbol (pound sign or hash) at the front of a word (or set of words), it became much easier to use Twitter Search to find tweets that were intended to be related to a topic. The hashtag term provided a focused subset of tweets intended to address a specific topic. Many hashtags grow organically and arise out of events (#hurricane, #earthquake, #tsunami, et al.). In a short time, people will include the hashtag in tweets as they post news, resources and other information about the event or topic. The hashtag term produces more “on topic” tweets and reduces “noise” that you get with searches on the term itself.

To see how this works, do a quick Twitter search on “bears” and then on “#bears.”

This usage of hashtags is fascinating in the case of breaking events, and can help you evaluate “news” you get critically. These types of hashtags can relate to almost anything (sports teams, TV shows, bands) and they tend to develop a quasi-officialness. If you want to see comments and participate in the conversation while watching a TV show, you’ll want to search on #topchef rather than top chef.

A second purpose of hashtags is the “official” or promoted form of hashtag. It’s an extension of the idea of the first use I described. A great example is a conference where the conference organizers will encourage people to use the official hashtag (e.g., #abatechshow) rather than other variations. You might have even noticed ads that include a reference to an official hashtag. These hashtags work in the same way to help people use the search function to find relevant tweets.

A third purpose of hashtags is a kind of “meta” usage. In these cases, the hashtag is used as a comment, often ironic, about the contents of the tweet. For me, this harkens back to the early days of HTML when people would use non-functioning HTML tags to make comments (e.g., comment). Hashtags can be used in a similar way – #joking or #sarcasm. There are some classic hashtags that express frustration or other emotions – #FAIL. Some hashtags can get very meta and comment on the tweet – “thingsnobodywouldsay.” In other words, they attempt to add depth and nuance to a 140 character form of expression. It’s interesting stuff.

Which brings me to #gas and #bikeride.

The original source of #gas for me was Marty “The Trademark Blog” Schwimmer. We had been talking about the “Internet of Things” and how people might act as sensors or nodes for certain types of data that could be collected and aggregated via Twitter. Marty suggested that people around the country (or world) could tweet the price of gas, use the #gas hashtag when they did so, and then we all could use the Twitter search function to see what prices were elsewhere, see patterns, track changing prices, et al.

I loved this idea and told Marty he was brilliant. Interestingly, Marty convinced me to do this, but didn’t convince himself. For quite a few years, I’ve tweeted gas prices when I’ve filled up my car. When I connected Twitter and Facebook, these #gas tweets populated my Facebook updates, generally confusing my friends. I should have, and probably will, decouple my Twitter account from Facebook, but haven’t done so yet.

However, I’ve found that the #gas posts have an interesting effect. I went to ABA TECHSHOW a couple of years ago, In the first hour I was there, four or five people told me the gas prices in their area and comment on relative prices by geographic region. I’ve also had people locally tell me that they’ve saved money by remembering the price I’d posted and avoiding higher prices elsewhere.

#bikeride is a simple idea. I wanted to keep a record of the mileage I’d ridden for myself and share it with a few friends. I decided to experiment with the hashtag on Twitter as a way to do that and noticed that other cyclists used the same hashtag.

I post my mileage after I ride and sometimes make a note about weather or route. Again, it starts in Twitter and automatically goes to Facebook. #bikeride is actually something that has outlived its usefulness for me as a tracking tool because I use an iPhone app I really like called Endomondo to record and store my rides.

I keep doing the #bikeride tweets, however, because they also have had an interesting effect. I’ve found other friends who ride bikes. I’ve had people tell me that I’ve inspired them to start riding. I’ve had people ask me advice about buying bikes.

Anyway, that’s the long answer. Both are hashtag experiments. Both have had intriguing results. I’m curious whether others have had memorable results from using hashtags.

If you have a question for me to answer in this series, you may submit it for me through the usual channels – email at denniskennedyblog @ gmail . com, a comment left on the original post about the Q&A series, this post or a subsequent post, or through Twitter (@dkennedyblog), or whatever other way you want to reach me.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Will You Be Writing a 2012 or 2013 Legal Tech Trends Article?

Thursday, December 13th, 2012

[Note: I’m running a Q&A series all the rest of December on DennisKennedy.Blog (details here).]

Will You Be Writing a 2012 or 2013 Legal Tech Trends Article?

The answer is: No. Well, maybe if someone made me an offer I couldn’t refuse, I’d think about it, but I still think I’d say no.

I get this question fairly often around the end of the year. It used to be an annual tradition for me to write an article summarizing the most important legal tech trends I found in the preceding year or make predictions about the next year. I’ve drifted away from that practice for a number of reasons:

1. Tom Mighell and I typically cover this topic in an episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast (an example). In fact, we’ve already talked about covering this topic in an upcoming episode.

2. I had gotten into the habit of matching the number of trends to the year (12 Trends for 2012?) and the number of trends simply got to be too large for me to attempt. (See my 2008 article)

3. Too many of the people I respect in legal tech said either that the trends are really the same as the previous year or that there was nothing really eye-openingly new. For example, I’m not sure that saying predictive coding or technology-assisted review in e-discovery is really something that would not have been said for the last several years. It doesn’t really feel new to me. Social media? Cloud? Those topics have been around for quite a while. I’m reluctant to write an article that simply says some things I’ve mentioned before are still around and haven’t made much progress.

4. I don’t really have a regular writing outlet these that makes sense for an article like that, and it would be a very long blog post (even by my standards).

With a couple of possible exceptions, legal tech seems like a sleepy area lately. The agendas for legal tech shows (with the exception of tablets and apps) look a lot like they did a few years back. Those observations, unfortunately, would make for a rather sleepy legal tech trends article. It’s more fun for me, and more interesting for you, that Tom and I cover the topic in the podcast format rather than that I write an article.

I am, however, definitely interested in what others see as the hot, significant trends and whether people disagree with my overall assessment.

If you have a question for me to answer in this series, you may submit it for me through the usual channels – email at denniskennedyblog @ gmail . com, a comment left on the original post about the Q&A series, this post or a subsequent post, or through Twitter (@dkennedyblog), or whatever other way you want to reach me.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Will There Be Blawggie Awards in 2012?

Wednesday, December 12th, 2012

[Note: I’m running a Q&A series all the rest of December on DennisKennedy.Blog (details here).]

Will there be Blawggie Awards in 2012?

The answer is: Yes, I think so. In fact, I’m pretty sure there will be. Probably on the usual date: December 20. I suspect that I’ll have a smaller list of awards and less-expansive commentary than in the past, but you never know.

I started the Blawggie Awards for best law-related bogs back in 2004. 2012 will be the 9th edition of the Blawggies, making them, as I like to say, the longest-running set of awards for law-related blogging presented by a lawyer blogger named Dennis Kennedy located in St. Louis, MO.

I started the Blawggies because I wanted to acknowledge the blogs I read every day and really liked, and I wanted to see if you could just announce your own set of awards on your blog and people would take them seriously. Blogging is about experimenting.

Over the years, the Blawggies have become something of an institution. As I’ve often said, the reactions to the Blawggies have varied greatly, with a common reaction being “Who is this guy and why does he think he can give awards?” On the other hand, the Blawggies have actually inspired some other annual legal blogging awards. One of my goals with the Blawggies has always been to help people find great blogs to read.

I occasionally get asked if someone can nominate a blog (OK, surprisingly, it’s often their own they have in mind) for consideration for the Blawggies. Unfortunately, the main criterion for the awards is that I actually read the blogs on a regular basis, so the idea of nomination doesn’t really make sense. However, I don’t mind if you mention some law-related blogs in the comments that you think are especially good and that you’d like to bring to the attention of readers of this blog.

If you have a question for me to answer in this series, you may submit it for me through the usual channels – email at denniskennedyblog @ gmail . com, a comment left on the original post about the Q&A series, this post or a subsequent post, or through Twitter (@dkennedyblog), or whatever other way you want to reach me.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

It’s Q & A Time for Rest of December at DennisKennedy.Blog

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

One of my longtime traditions at DennisKennedy.Blog is answering audience questions. This approach lets me catch up publicly on questions from readers I get by email, comments and otherwise and encourages current readers (like you) to ask their own questions.

It also gives me starting points for new blog posts. It’s been a little difficult for me to get back into the rhythm of blogging after the death of my mother last month (thank you everyone who sent their condolences and a big thank you especially to Rev. Bill Haworth at the Garrett Presbyterian Church ) and I’ve had a lot of other things going on as well.

Blogging has had to take a bit of a backseat lately, although I haven’t totally disappeared – some new articles from me that have appeared lately include: Talkin’ Tools: Smartphones, Tablets Walk the Walk, ‘Facing’ It: It Can Be Worth It to Join the Social Media Giant and, with Allison Shields, When lawyers ‘like’ Facebook: Using the site to attract and maintain clients. I’ve also been posting on Twitter and elsewhere on social media.

So, I’ve decided to run a new round of the Q & A format for this blog until at least the end of the month (perhaps longer, if the approach is popular).

The approach is simple. I’ll dip into the questions I’ve already gotten throughout the last few months and readers like you may submit questions for me through the usual channels – email at denniskennedyblog @ gmail . com, a comment left on this post or a subsequent post, or through Twitter (@dkennedyblog), or whatever other way you want to reach me.

As a general matter, I would expect the questions to be about legal technology and related topics (including blogging and social media, law practice management, and future of law practice), but feel free to ask about anything. I also hope others use the comments section to have conversations around the questions and answers.

As usual, I reserve the right not to answer all questions or, more likely, to answer an easier version of the question you ask me. Historically, I haven’t included names of the questioners and probably won’t this time either, but, if you are OK with me using your name, let me know that in your communication with your question.

It should be fun. Let me know what’s on your mind.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.