Technology-Lawyer

Dennis Kennedy

Technology Law and Legal Technology. Dennis Kennedy is one of the few technology lawyers who is also an expert on the underlying technologies. Dennis an award-winning leader in the application of technology and the Internet to the practice of law. DennisKennedy.com gives you access to a wide variety of Dennis Kennedy's resources on legal technology, his writings, his well-known blog, DennisKennedy.Blog, and information about how you can have Dennis speak to your organization or group.

Dennis Kennedy is one of the most knowledgeable legal technologists you will find. - Michael Arkfeld.

Dennis Kennedy, a lawyer and legal technology expert in St. Louis, Mo., has been a significant influence in the ever-evolving relationship between lawyers and the Web. - Robert Ambrogi

Posts Tagged ‘facebook’

MoBar Lex Port Legal Tech Conference – October 3 & 4

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

If you will be in the St. Louis area on October 3 and 4, there’s a great legal tech conference called Lex Port that the Missouri Bar Association is putting on. In just its second year, Lex Port has a great schedule of programs, national legal tech speakers (Mike Downey, Ben Schorr, Jeff Taylor and Paul Unger), an attractive price, and, I’ve already been told, an impressive number of attendees already registered, I believe doubling the excellent attendance of the inaugural event last year.

Lex Port logo

However, there’s always room for more, and walk-up registration is still possible. Check with the Missouri Bar. We’d like to see you at the conference in St. Charles, Missouri.

The agenda (see details here) is wide-ranging, with lots of great topics, from Microsoft Office programs to ethics to tablet and apps to technology law topics and much more.

I’ll be speaking at three sessions on Friday, October 4:

FACEBOOK IN 50 MINUTES FOR LAWYERS

Facebook has more than 1 BILLION users. What does this mean for lawyers? Is Facebook right for you and your practice? Whether you simply want to know enough about Facebook to advise your clients or you want to jump in or improve your Facebook presence, this practical session will provide you with strategies, lessons and tips for using Facebook to achieve personal and professional goals. You will learn how to decide whether Facebook makes sense for you and your practice, setting up a personal and/or professional presence, dealing with privacy and security settings, and much more.

DEATH, DISABILITY & DIGITAL ESTATE PLANNING

We all now have a growing base of digital “property” – passwords, online accounts, photos and much more. What happens to your digital assets on death or incapacity? Do traditional probate rules and concepts work in the parallel universe of digital property? Who can access online accounts? How do you obtain passwords? How can digital property be accessed and transferred to heirs? How do we prepare for dealing with our increasingly online world? This practical session will look at the issues that have already arisen, future concerns and how laws and lawyers are trying to keep up with online trends.

50 APPS IN 50 MINUTES (with Jeff Taylor and Lucas Boling)

Over 1,000,000 Android Apps, more than 900,000 iPhone and iPad apps, and 130,000+ Windows Phone apps – with so many choices, how do you find apps relevant to your practice and your busy life? You will not want to miss this fast-paced session that highlights 50 of the best apps for the legal professional.

The great people at the Missouri Bar Association always do a great job with conferences and I expect this year’s Lex Port conference to exceed the high standard set by last year’s event.

I hope to see you there. As always, I enjoy meeting readers of this blog. Please feel free to introduce yourself.

- Dennis Kennedy

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers (Second Edition), the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available. Our previous book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, is also available (iBook version here). Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

New Article: 13 Facebook Tips for Lawyers in 2013

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

In perhaps the classic example of “I didn’t have enough time to write a shorter article, so I wrote a longer one,” I have a new article out in the February issue of the Law Practice Today webzine. It runs about 3,000 words and is called “Thirteen Facebook Tips for Lawyers in 2013.”

As the article summary says:

Still scared of Facebook? Come on, it’s 2013 already—can 1 billion users really all be wrong? Here are 13 tips to guide even the most reluctant late adopter on how to get the most of the most popular social media tool.

The article offers some of my observations about lawyers using (and, mainly, not using) Facebook, thirteen practical tips (anybody else notice that matching the number of tips to the year has upped the degree of difficulty for these types of tips articles?), and three simple action steps to get yourself going on Facebook.

The money quote:

There are many reasons lawyers probably should be using Facebook, but I’m not sure that convince many reluctant lawyers with those reasons. Instead, consider my view that there may be no better resource than Facebook to help you reconnect with people who were important in your life with whom you have lost contact.

I expect that Allison Shields and I will cover many of these tips in more detail in our upcoming presentation on LinkedIn and Facebook at ABA TECHSHOW 2013 in Chicago in April.You will also have the chance to talk about these topics with Allison and me at the Taste of TECHSHOW dinner we will be hosting on April 4.

Hope you find the new article helpful.If you want to dive even deeper into Facebook, you might consider reading Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, which is also available in an iBook version.

What other tips do you have for for lawyers to make better use of Facebook?

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Will You Be Speaking at ABA TECHSHOW 2013?

Thursday, December 27th, 2012

[Note: I’m running a Q&A series all the rest of December on DennisKennedy.Blog (details here).]

Will You Be Speaking at ABA TECHSHOW?

The answer is: Yes, I have been invited to speak at two sessions. I definitely want to make my return to ABA TECHSHOW after the blood clot in my leg last spring forced me to cancel my trip to ABA TECHSHOW 2012.

ABA TECHSHOW 2013 will be held April 4 – 6, 2013. If you are interested in learning practical ways lawyers can use technology better, it’s the place to be.

On Thursday, April 4, from 2:00 to 3:00, I’ll be co-presenting with Allison Shields a session called “Leveraging LinkedIn & Finagling Facebook: Building Relevance on Leading Social Media.” It’s on the Social Media Track and is labeled for an “Intermediate” audience. Here’s the description from the schedule:

LinkedIn is no longer just “the professional’s” social network any more than Facebook is just the “personal” social network. The volume of users and traffic requires that you market to both. Learn how to derive value from both of these essential platforms. Explore the differences, identify necessary information to complete profiles, and learn valuable insights into the best features. Review tools to maximize the benefits of these services, and acquire up-to-date information needed to customize privacy settings to avoid ethical pitfalls.

I wanted to be clear that I wouldn’t have chosen the word “finagling” to use in this title and am not quite sure how it’s being used, but let’s agree to use the word in the sense of one of its dictionary meanings: “to plan out usually with subtle skill or care.” Maybe we can get the title changed.

Allison and I plan to share as many practical insights and tips from our Facebook and LinkedIn “In One Hour” books as time will permit, so you should get especially good value from the the session.

The second session I’m scheduled for will be with Patrick Crowley and is simply called “Mobile Collaboration.” It will be on Friday, April 5, from 2:30 to 3:30. It’s labeled for an “Introductory” audience. Here’s the description:

Technology can cut the costs of working with others in a variety of locations, locally or abroad. Google+ Hangouts, Facetime, Google Drive, Cloud Connect, SharePoint and others can help you not just keep in touch, but collaborate with other lawyers in your firm, co-counsel, or clients in real time. Learn how you can utilize your mobile device to provide better service to your clients by sharing documents, developing ideas, and boosting your productivity whether you’re in or out of the office.

I have written a new article about mobile collaboration that is scheduled to appear in the Law Practice Today webzine in January. Mobile collaboration will be one of the hot topics in legal tech in 2013, so I’m excited to get the chance to speak at this session.

Although not yet finalized, I’m expecting to be co-hosting a Taste of TECHSHOW dinner event with Allison Shields with a social media theme and another with Tom Mighell, probably with a future of legal technology theme. Watch for the opportunity to sign up for the dinners on the TECHSHOW website.

Note that there is a mobile app for TECHSHOW available and you can follow Twitter posts about TECHSHOW by searching Twitter for the #ABATECHSHOW hashtag.

Hope to see you there. If you are a reader of this blog, please introduce yourself. I always enjoy speaking with readers of my blog.

If you have a question for me to answer in this series, you may submit it for me through the usual channels – email at denniskennedyblog @ gmail . com, a comment left on the original post about the Q&A series, this post or a subsequent post, or through Twitter (@dkennedyblog), or whatever other way you want to reach me.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Would You Explain #gas and #bikeride?

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

[Note: I’m running a Q&A series all the rest of December on DennisKennedy.Blog (details here).]

Would You Explain #gas and #bikeride?

The answer is: Yes, I’d be happy to explain my use of #gas and #bikeride on Twitter and Facebook. They are good examples of what are known as hashtags.

If you follow me on Twitter (@denniskennedy) or are a Friend of mine on Facebook (you know who you are), you will occasionally see updates from me that look like:

#gas – Webster Groves, MO Circle K – $2.95, regular

or

#bikeride – today, 15 miles

I’ve been doing this for several years, as I’ll explain, as a Twitter experiment. They all start out as tweets on Twitter. After I linked my Facebook account to Twitter, they are automatically posted to Facebook as updates as soon as I tweet them on Twitter.

So, what do they mean?

First, we need to talk about “hashtags.” Hashtags are a Twitter phenomenon, although they are used in other places as well. See the Wikipedia explanation of hashtags.

Hashtags serve several purposes. I’ll illustrate this using Twitter as my example.

The most interesting purpose, at least to me, is they represent a form of self-organization to facilitate the search of tweets and an informal form of tagging. People found that if they put a # symbol (pound sign or hash) at the front of a word (or set of words), it became much easier to use Twitter Search to find tweets that were intended to be related to a topic. The hashtag term provided a focused subset of tweets intended to address a specific topic. Many hashtags grow organically and arise out of events (#hurricane, #earthquake, #tsunami, et al.). In a short time, people will include the hashtag in tweets as they post news, resources and other information about the event or topic. The hashtag term produces more “on topic” tweets and reduces “noise” that you get with searches on the term itself.

To see how this works, do a quick Twitter search on “bears” and then on “#bears.”

This usage of hashtags is fascinating in the case of breaking events, and can help you evaluate “news” you get critically. These types of hashtags can relate to almost anything (sports teams, TV shows, bands) and they tend to develop a quasi-officialness. If you want to see comments and participate in the conversation while watching a TV show, you’ll want to search on #topchef rather than top chef.

A second purpose of hashtags is the “official” or promoted form of hashtag. It’s an extension of the idea of the first use I described. A great example is a conference where the conference organizers will encourage people to use the official hashtag (e.g., #abatechshow) rather than other variations. You might have even noticed ads that include a reference to an official hashtag. These hashtags work in the same way to help people use the search function to find relevant tweets.

A third purpose of hashtags is a kind of “meta” usage. In these cases, the hashtag is used as a comment, often ironic, about the contents of the tweet. For me, this harkens back to the early days of HTML when people would use non-functioning HTML tags to make comments (e.g., comment). Hashtags can be used in a similar way – #joking or #sarcasm. There are some classic hashtags that express frustration or other emotions – #FAIL. Some hashtags can get very meta and comment on the tweet – “thingsnobodywouldsay.” In other words, they attempt to add depth and nuance to a 140 character form of expression. It’s interesting stuff.

Which brings me to #gas and #bikeride.

The original source of #gas for me was Marty “The Trademark Blog” Schwimmer. We had been talking about the “Internet of Things” and how people might act as sensors or nodes for certain types of data that could be collected and aggregated via Twitter. Marty suggested that people around the country (or world) could tweet the price of gas, use the #gas hashtag when they did so, and then we all could use the Twitter search function to see what prices were elsewhere, see patterns, track changing prices, et al.

I loved this idea and told Marty he was brilliant. Interestingly, Marty convinced me to do this, but didn’t convince himself. For quite a few years, I’ve tweeted gas prices when I’ve filled up my car. When I connected Twitter and Facebook, these #gas tweets populated my Facebook updates, generally confusing my friends. I should have, and probably will, decouple my Twitter account from Facebook, but haven’t done so yet.

However, I’ve found that the #gas posts have an interesting effect. I went to ABA TECHSHOW a couple of years ago, In the first hour I was there, four or five people told me the gas prices in their area and comment on relative prices by geographic region. I’ve also had people locally tell me that they’ve saved money by remembering the price I’d posted and avoiding higher prices elsewhere.

#bikeride is a simple idea. I wanted to keep a record of the mileage I’d ridden for myself and share it with a few friends. I decided to experiment with the hashtag on Twitter as a way to do that and noticed that other cyclists used the same hashtag.

I post my mileage after I ride and sometimes make a note about weather or route. Again, it starts in Twitter and automatically goes to Facebook. #bikeride is actually something that has outlived its usefulness for me as a tracking tool because I use an iPhone app I really like called Endomondo to record and store my rides.

I keep doing the #bikeride tweets, however, because they also have had an interesting effect. I’ve found other friends who ride bikes. I’ve had people tell me that I’ve inspired them to start riding. I’ve had people ask me advice about buying bikes.

Anyway, that’s the long answer. Both are hashtag experiments. Both have had intriguing results. I’m curious whether others have had memorable results from using hashtags.

If you have a question for me to answer in this series, you may submit it for me through the usual channels – email at denniskennedyblog @ gmail . com, a comment left on the original post about the Q&A series, this post or a subsequent post, or through Twitter (@dkennedyblog), or whatever other way you want to reach me.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Facebook for Lawyers Webinar on September 27

Wednesday, September 19th, 2012

On Thursday, September 27 (at 10:00 AM Pacific; 12:00 PM Central; 1:00 PM Eastern), I’ll be speaking on “Facebook for Lawyers” for an hour as part of Avvo’s Free Legal Marketing Seminars series. You can sign up for the webinar here.

Here’s the description:

Facebook is rapidly approaching 1 BILLION users. Now the largest – and most active – social media platform in the world, long gone are the days of it being a network for college kids. Instead individuals, professionals and businesses alike use the site to connect with each other and share information every day. Increasingly Facebook profiles and pages are also showing up in search results. But what does this all mean for the legal industry? Lawyers may understand how Facebook works, but are hesitant to participate for a variety of reasons. Others are excited to jump in, but aren’t sure where to start or what it will take to be successful. In this webinar Dennis Kennedy, lawyer and co-author of the new book Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, published by the ABA Law Practice Management Section, will provide attendees with strategies, lessons and tips for using Facebook to achieve personal and professional goals.

Lawyers who attend this webinar will learn about:

- How to determine if Facebook is right for you and your practice
- How to set up a personal and a professional Facebook presence
- The ever-evolving security and privacy settings
- Content creation, making connections and growing your network
- Facebook’s latest announcements and advanced features

I’ll cover some of the main topics and themes of the new book, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, Allison Shields and I wrote, including quite a few of the practical tips in the book. The webinar will be appropriate for Facebook beginners, although I’ll touch on a number of topics and strategies for more advanced users. Also, while the focus will be on use of Facebook by lawyers, I think that the potential audience extends beyond lawyers.

If you plan to attend the webinar and have any questions or topics you’d like me to address, let me know. Register for the free webinar here.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available. Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

The Arrival of Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers

Monday, August 27th, 2012

When I got home from work this evening, I found a package that had been delivered today. I opened it and found:

A closer look:

Yes, the new book from Allison Shields and me, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, has arrived. For me, my books only really seem real when I get my personal copies in hand.

This book is our “sequel” to LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, which was published earlier this year. In fact, what I mainly remember about the publication of the LinkedIn book was how fast the deadline for the first draft of the Facebook book was approaching.

We’re quite pleased with the way Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers turned out, although we stretch the concept of “in one hour” well past the breaking point. You’ll get a lot of value in this book. I did prove that it is possible to read the main section of this book in one hour, but I’m a really fast reader.

I believe that the book is still technically in the pre-order period and is available with a 15% discount as a pre-order. We’re excited about this book and think you will be, too. If your firm or organization might consider using the book for social media training efforts, let me know and I can put you in touch with our publishing contacts for info about volume discounts. If you might be interested in a review copy (and have an audience that will appreciate the review), let me know. And, of course, don’t forget about LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers.

Although, frankly, I expect the only book Allison and I might consider next would be “Resting Up after Writing Two Books in Less Than a Year in One Hour for Lawyers,” I have grown fond of the “in One Hour” format and I think it has a lot of potential. I’ll be the Vice-chair of the ABA Law Practice Management Section’s Publishing Board this year and would be happy to hear any topics for an “in One Hour” book that you know that you would definitely buy.

Here’s a link the ordering page for Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers – I hope you enjoy the book.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

The book Allison Shields and I have written called “LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers” is now available and also as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Facebook for Lawyers Webinar on May 17

Monday, May 14th, 2012

With the IPO of Facebook fast approaching, interest in Facebook is reaching a fever pitch. As a result, even lawyers are starting to take notice of Facebook and how they might use it personally and professionally.

I’ll be co-presenting with Allison Shields on a May 17 webinar on “Facebook for Lawyers” (a joint production of ALI-CLE and the ABA’s Law Practice Management Section) and there’s still time to register. Details here. This presentation will have a highly practical focus and we’ll concentrate on ways to help you actually use Facebook rather than the all-too-common approach of worrying about a parade of Facebook risks.

Allison has more details and some Facebook tips here. Allison and I just did a well-received presentation on this topic, with a great audience who asked a lot of questions. That audience was the first audience we’ve seen where every attendee had a Facebook account. We’ll incorporate what we learned about what issues are important to lawyers from those questions into this webinar presentation. If you are using Facebook, it only makes sense to learn how to use it well.

As the perceptive reader will guess, you can also expect to see a new book from Allison and me called “Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers” later this summer, possibly in early August. The May 17 webinar will give you a good preview of the book.

Hope to “see” you at the webinar.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

The new book Allison Shields and I have written called “LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers” is now available. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Upcoming Facebook for Lawyers Presentation and Webinar

Tuesday, May 1st, 2012

As the number of Facebook users approaches the one billion mark, lawyers are starting to take interest in Facebook and how they might use it.

I’ll be co-presenting with Allison Shields at an upcoming presentation and a webinar on the “Facebook for Lawyers” topic.

First, this Friday, May 4, if you are in the San Francisco area or are attending the ABA Law Practice Management Section’s Spring Meeting in Napa, you can see our live presentation called, simply enough, “Facebook for Lawyers.” Details here.

Second, on May 17, Allison and I will be presenting an ALI-ABA webinar called, simply enough, “Facebook for Lawyers.” Details here.

As the perceptive reader will guess, you can also expect to see a new book from Allison and me called Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers later this summer. Both the May 4 presentation and the May 17 webinar can be expected to give you a preview of the book.

Hope to see you for one or both of these events.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

The new book Allison Shields and I have written called “LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers” is now available. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

One Inbox to Rule Them All – Podcast

Monday, December 13th, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “One Inbox to Rule Them All” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Clio. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – consider trying out an episode or becoming a regular subscriber through iTunes or our RSS feed.

Here’s the episode (#43) description:

Facebook has just announced its new Facebook Messages, which has been referred to as “Facebook email” or a “Gmail killer.” It’s not exactly email, but it does aim to centralize all of our messaging in the Facebook platform. Given Facebook’s scope, is this a game-changer? In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell take a look at Facebook Messages and its implications, how social media and webmail are changing our relationship to email, and whether Facebook Messages or other forms of webmail are in your future. After you listen,

I keep hearing myself say this year that is “email is broken.” Facebook Messages is the latest high visibility effort to radically change the way we use email. In part, it’s a way to give you a Facebook email address, but, more so, it’s a way to bring email, instant messages, Facebook messages and the like into a unified inbox.

We were a little wary of any high-profile “email replacement” after Google Wave fizzled out, but we explored some of the potential advantages and disadvantages of a Facebook-based approach, including potential electronic discovery issues and reservations about giving Facebook even more of our information.

I’m intrigued by the idea of a unified inbox or social media dashboard, whether it might be Facebook Messages or something yet to come. Whether or not Facebook Messages is the right answer or not, the fact is that anything available to Facebook’s 500 million users simply cannot be ignored. You’ll want to watch developments in Facebook Messages before they sneak up on you.

In our “stuff Tom and Dennis having been talking about” segment, we take a look at our practical experiences with e-book readers and share the ways we have found them useful. Tom, a longtime user of the Kindle, also talks about his experience with the iPad as an ebook reader.

We end the episode with our Parting Shots segment, in which we give a couple of useful tips. Tom talks about the Rockmelt Browser, a new browser that incoporates social media. I was dubious about a new browser, but Tom managed to get me interested in trying it, even though I haven’t started yet. I recommend the Canadian Broadcasting Company’s Spark podcast, a weekly radio show hosted by Nora Young that covers technology and its many consequences in an engaging, entertaining and educational way. I especially liked episode 127.

Let us know what you think about this episode. Show notes for the podcast are here. And try some of the back episodes as well. I recommend subscribing to the podcast on iTunes so you automatically get each new episode as it is released. You can also now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools