Technology-Lawyer

Dennis Kennedy

Technology Law and Legal Technology. Dennis Kennedy is one of the few technology lawyers who is also an expert on the underlying technologies. Dennis an award-winning leader in the application of technology and the Internet to the practice of law. DennisKennedy.com gives you access to a wide variety of Dennis Kennedy's resources on legal technology, his writings, his well-known blog, DennisKennedy.Blog, and information about how you can have Dennis speak to your organization or group.

Dennis Kennedy is one of the most knowledgeable legal technologists you will find. - Michael Arkfeld.

Dennis Kennedy, a lawyer and legal technology expert in St. Louis, Mo., has been a significant influence in the ever-evolving relationship between lawyers and the Web. - Robert Ambrogi

Posts Tagged ‘kennedy’

When Will the Next Episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Podcast Appear?

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013

[Note: I’m going to continue running a Q&A series at through through January (and maybe much longer) on DennisKennedy.Blog. Details on how to submit your questions to me may be found at the end of this post.]

I am a fan of both your column and your podcast with Tom Mighell. I seem to recall that you and Tom published your podcast yourselves before moving to the Legal Talk Network. Have you and Tom considered going back to self-publishing the podcast? Alternatively, is there a chance the podcast could find a new home? – Mike Morse

The answer is: Yes, there is a 100% chance the podcast will find a new home.

Let me pre-announce that the Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast (“a podcast on legal technology, with an Internet focus”) will soon return to regular production at its new home – the ABA’s Legal Technology Resource Center. The podcast will be part of what will become a group of legal technology-related podcasts produced by and distributed through the Legal Technology Resource Center.

Tom and I are currently working on the next episode of the podcast, so we expect the relaunch to be soon, tentatively in early January.

There might also be some other announcements related to the podcast coming in the near future.

We were very sad when we learned that the Legal Talk Network had to stop production of our podcast and the other podcasts on the network, but knew that we wanted to continue. As I mentioned in my 2012 Blawggies post, the Legal Talk Network was very important in the history of law-related podcasting and it was an honor and a pleasure to be part of it. Moving to the Legal Technology Resource Center seemed like a perfect fit for us and we are pleased that we could put the relaunch together.

The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast has a long history. Tom and I launched it when we learned that we would be speaking about podcasting at the 2006 ABA TECHSHOW. We produced 6 episodes on our own. I refer to these episodes as the “lost” episodes because they were taken off the Internet and, until recently, neither Tom nor I could find backup copies. Fortunately, Tom recently found copies.

We did 93 episodes for the Legal Talk Network. I consider the episodes as some of my best work and thinking about legal technology, especially the episodes in 2012.

The mathematicians among you will realize that 6 + 93 = 99. We’[ve decided, however, to continue with the numbering of the current podcast and treat the first six as unnumbered “lost” episodes. That means the first episode of the relaunched podcast will be #94, giving us time to put together a special “hundredth show” episode.

We appreciate the patience that listeners and subscribers to the podcast have had as we make this transition, the nice notes we’ve gotten from people like Mike, and all the positive response the podcast has gotten over the years.

If you have suggestions for topics for upcoming podcast episodes or questions for us to answer on the podcast, let us know. The show notes page for the podcast is here. You can still find earlier episodes on the Legal Talk Network website and in iTunes. We expect that iTunes subscribers will not have to do anything to continue to get the new episodes.

If you have a question for me to answer, you may submit it for me through the usual channels – email at denniskennedyblog @ gmail . com, a comment left on the original post about the Q&A series, this post or a subsequent post, or through Twitter (@dkennedyblog), or whatever other way you want to reach me.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Evelyn Kennedy (1936 – 2012)

Monday, November 5th, 2012

My Mom, Evelyn Kennedy, passed away this afternoon after a long, courageous and inspiring battle with Parkinson’s Disease.

Your thoughts and prayers for our family would be appreciated.

A picture from last July:

Picture of Evelyn Kennedy with Grace, Colleen and Dennis - July 2012

American Parkinson Disease Association

Michael J. Fox Foundation

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Will Lawyers Always Be Late Adopters? – New Podcast

Wednesday, October 24th, 2012

I’ve seen and heard a couple of things recently about lawyers using (and not using) technology that left me shaking my head. Tom and I decided that gave us a good reason to talk about whether lawyers are really late adopters of technology in the newest episode of the Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal Talk Network. This episode is called “Will Lawyers Always Be Late Adopters?.”

Remember that you can subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and receive new episodes automatically. The show notes site for the podcast is at TKMReport.com.

Here’s the description for this episode:

EPISODE #93

#93. Will Lawyers Always Be Late Adopters?

Lawyers are known as notorious late adopters of technology. Is that a fair characterization? Of course it is. What makes lawyers so cautious about new technologies? Will lawyers always be late adopters? In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss some recent experiences that have reinforced the idea that lawyers are late adopters, the reasons people do and do not adopt new technologies, and practical ways for lawyers to think about moving to new technologies. Podcast here

In large part, this episode was inspired by a picture a friend posted of a computer in a law office running a DOS program. We had also seen two recent blog posts about technology adoption that we thought made some good points about technology adoption: Michael Sampson’s “Why is New Technology Not Adopted?” and Jared Spool’s “Why People Adopt Or Wait For New Technology.” I highly recommend both posts and we discuss them in the podcast and offer a few observations of our own. If you are interested in legal tech, I think you’ll enjoy this episode. We hope it starts a few conversations.

If you haven’t listened to the podcast before or in a while, give this one a listen and then subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

If you have topics you’d like us to cover on the podcast or questions we can answer on the podcast, let us know by leaving a comment or sending me an email.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Living in a Public Beta – New Podcast

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

Does it seem lately like you’re the subject of more and more technology experiments? Tom and I discuss a topic many people have been wondering about lately in the newest episode of the Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal Talk Network. This episode is called “Living in a Public Beta.”

Remember that you can subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and receive new episodes automatically. The show notes site for the podcast is at TKMReport.com.

Here’s the description for this episode:

EPISODE #92

#92. Living in a Public Beta

There’s been a lot of discussion lately about what many see as Apple’s stumble with its maps application in iOS 6. Bryan Wolfe on AppAdvice.com recently asked “Did I Miss The Memo From Apple Making Us All Beta Testers?” From operating systems to software to apps to web services, we often find that new products and services don’t’ quite feel finished. In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss changing expectations in a world of fast and frequent software releases and updates, the challenge for lawyers wanting stability with their technology, and ways to cope with what feels like living in a giant public beta test. Podcast here

Bryan Wolfe’s post raises some interesting questions about our expectations about software and web services, our expectations about completed versions, the evolution of software, need for upgrades, and today’s software development methods and processes. Tom and I don’t have any definitive answer (although I felt like I used the word “tolerance” quite a few times). It was a fun episode to record and we hope it starts some discussion. As always, let us know if you have questions or comments.

If you haven’t listened to the this one a listen and then subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

If you have topics you’d like us to cover on the podcast or questions we can answer on the podcast, let us know by leaving a comment or sending me an email.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available (iBook version here). Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

“Legal Tech Surveys Say . . .” – New Podcast

Thursday, October 4th, 2012

Tom and I talk about two recently-released surveys of legal technology on the newest episode of the Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal Talk Network. This episode is called 2012 Legal Tech Surveys Say . . ..

Remember that you can subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and receive new episodes automatically. The show notes site for the podcast is at TKMReport.com.

Here’s the description for this episode:

EPISODE #91

#91. 2012 Legal Tech Surveys Say . . .

We hear a lot of stories about lawyers using (and not using) technology. It’s always been difficult to get good data on what is actually happening in the ground. The release of results from two major annual surveys about the use of technology by lawyers gives us some data to assess trends and draw conclusions. In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell take a look at highlights of the 2012 ILTA / Inside Legal Technology Purchase Survey and the 2012 Legal Technology Survey Report from the ABA’s Legal Technology Resource Center, the trends the surveys show, and some practical implications of the survey results. Podcast here

A tip of the hat to JoAnna Forshee at InsideLegal and to ILTA for putting together the 2012 ILTA/InsideLegal Technology Purchasing Survey and to Joshua Poje of the ABA for his great summary of ten highlights of the 2012 Legal Technology Resource Center survey. Tom Mighell and I will be serving on the Legal Technology Resource Center’s board this year, so I’d appreciate hearing any feedback or ideas you might have for the Legal Technology Resource Center.

If you have topics you’d like us to cover on the podcast or questions we can answer on the podcast, let us know by leaving a comment or sending me an email.

If you haven’t listened to the podcast before or haven’t listened for a while, give this one a listen and then subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

Also, as a follow-up to my recent post about the webinar on Facebook for Lawyers I presented as part of Avvo’s legal marketing webinar series, here’s a link to the replay of that webinar.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available. Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

LinkedIn for Legal Professionals and Other Recent Podcasts

Tuesday, September 11th, 2012

It’s time to get caught up on recent episodes of the Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal talk Network.

In our most recent episode, Allison Shields was our guest to talk about LinkedIn for Legal Professionals.

Remember that you can subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and receive new episodes automatically. The show notes site for the podcast is at TKMReport.com.

If you have topics you’d like us to cover or questions we can answer on the podcast, let us know by leaving a comment or sending me an email.

RECENT EPISODES (#86 – #90)

#90. LinkedIn for Legal Professionals

Lawyers consistently tell us that LinkedIn is the social media platform that makes the most sense for lawyers and other legal professionals. They like the professional and business focus of LinkedIn as compared to the “personal” focus of Facebook and other platforms. However, lawyers also always tell us that they wish they could use LinkedIn better than they do now. In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell and special guest Allison Shields discuss the new book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, how lawyers can make better use of LinkedIn, and some practical tips lawyers and others can implement right away with LinkedIn. Podcast here

#89. Technology-enhanced Television

As rumors of a game-changing new Apple TV begin to swirl, we wonder whether technology will start to change the way we watch television. Or maybe it already has. Does technology always need to have “productive” uses? In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell turn to a “non-serious” technology topic for the end of summer, explore ways technology, especially tablets, can enhance your TV viewing experience, and find some surprisingly serious conclusions about where technology is taking us. Podcast here

#88. Putting the Web to Work for You

Have you ever wanted one action on the Web automatically trigger another action? For example, if you post a tweet, it automatically becomes a LinkedIn or Facebook update or if you star a blog post in Google Reader, it automatically gets added to your Evernote account. IFTTT (If This, Than That) is a web service does exactly that. In this episode of the Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss web automation and IFTTT, how it might make your life a little easier, and the role this type of service might play for the busy lawyer. Podcast here

#87. I’ll Tumblr for Ya

While Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter draw the lion’s share of social media attention, there are many other social media platforms available to lawyers. Tumblr, Pinterest and Foursquare are just a few of the alternatives. How can you evaluate which of these tools might be worthy of your time and effort? On The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell survey the lesser-traveled landscapes of the social media world, identify some tools that might make sense to some lawyers in some scenarios, and speculate about the future of specialized social media tools. Podcast here

#86. The Lost Art of the Online Discussion

For many years, we used email and listservs for private and public discussions. Today, the last thing we want to do is add a high-volume email list to our overloaded email inboxes. Yet, we still have the need for discussions of all kinds. What are good ways to have discussions using technology today? In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss today’s options for discussions, how to select the right forum for discussions, and whether we can improve the quality of the discussions we have with others. Podcast here

If you haven’t listened to the podcast before or haven’t listened for a while, give one or more of these a listen and then subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, the new book from Allison Shields and me, is now available. Our previous book, LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers is also available and also can be downloaded as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

The Arrival of Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers

Monday, August 27th, 2012

When I got home from work this evening, I found a package that had been delivered today. I opened it and found:

A closer look:

Yes, the new book from Allison Shields and me, Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers, has arrived. For me, my books only really seem real when I get my personal copies in hand.

This book is our “sequel” to LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers, which was published earlier this year. In fact, what I mainly remember about the publication of the LinkedIn book was how fast the deadline for the first draft of the Facebook book was approaching.

We’re quite pleased with the way Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers turned out, although we stretch the concept of “in one hour” well past the breaking point. You’ll get a lot of value in this book. I did prove that it is possible to read the main section of this book in one hour, but I’m a really fast reader.

I believe that the book is still technically in the pre-order period and is available with a 15% discount as a pre-order. We’re excited about this book and think you will be, too. If your firm or organization might consider using the book for social media training efforts, let me know and I can put you in touch with our publishing contacts for info about volume discounts. If you might be interested in a review copy (and have an audience that will appreciate the review), let me know. And, of course, don’t forget about LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers.

Although, frankly, I expect the only book Allison and I might consider next would be “Resting Up after Writing Two Books in Less Than a Year in One Hour for Lawyers,” I have grown fond of the “in One Hour” format and I think it has a lot of potential. I’ll be the Vice-chair of the ABA Law Practice Management Section’s Publishing Board this year and would be happy to hear any topics for an “in One Hour” book that you know that you would definitely buy.

Here’s a link the ordering page for Facebook in One Hour for Lawyers – I hope you enjoy the book.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

The book Allison Shields and I have written called “LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers” is now available and also as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Catching Up on The Kennedy-Mighell Report Podcast – Recent Episodes

Thursday, July 5th, 2012

It’s time to get caught up on recent episodes of the Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal talk Network.

I have a big batch of podcasts in this list, and some very good ones. It’s also a good time to remind you that you can subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and receive new episodes automatically.

And, remember, you don’t have to be a lawyer to listen to these podcasts. Tom and I try to cover a lot of ground that is not specific to lawyers. The show notes site for the podcast at TKMReport.com is back to life and will give you descriptions, resources mentioned in the episodes and more.

I highly recommend Episode #81 on estate planning for your digital estate.

RECENT EPISODES (#76 – #85)

#85. Find Now, Read Later

We can find almost anything on the Internet, but retrieving the results at a later date isn’t as easy. Are there ways to “harvest” the web so we can find and read relevant research at a later time? Kennedy-Mighell Report hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell, answer this question by sharing ways to save and keep track of web research, the resources for reading web findings later or offline, and whether techniques like capturing a blog post on a Kindle or iPad really help us with the problem of information overload. Podcast here

#84. Getting a Passing Grade on Passwords

Good password practices are essential in a world where major compromises are common. So how do you create, use and protect strong passwords for all of your accounts? Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell, the hosts of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, take a look at the current state of passwords, give recommendations on password management, and share some simple approaches to dealing with today’s password requirements. Podcast here

#83. Essential iPad Apps for Lawyers

Everywhere we go, we see lawyers using iPads. But what are they using them for? There are thousands of Apps available for the iPad – so many that it’s hard to know where to begin. Fortunately, Tom Mighell has written a new book called iPad Apps in One Hour for Lawyers. In this episode, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the importance of iPad apps for effective use of iPads, Tom’s book, and their favorite iPad Apps for lawyers and others. Podcast here

#82. Lawyers’ Duty to Know Technology?

Many lawyers say they are “good lawyers,” while knowing very little about legal technology. So does that statement really compute in this technology driven world? Recent discussions about possible changes to ethical rules include requirements that lawyers stay up-to-date on technology. Explore the intersection of technology, law practice and ethical rules, along with the implications for lawyers with Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell on this Kennedy-Mighell Report. Podcast here

#81. Planning for Your Digital Estate

With so much of your key information and assets migrating online, it’s a challenge to remember all your passwords and accounts. So just imagine the headaches your spouse or family will have trying to figure it all out once you pass away. On this Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss how to prepare your “digital estate” before death or incapacity. Podcast here

#80. Law Firms Go Mobile

There’s no doubt the net is going more and more mobile. In fact, Facebook recently revealed about half of its 800 million users access their accounts through their smartphones. So what are the implications of this move to mobile for the standard law firm website? In this episode, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the impact of mobile devices on web design, the web design movement known as Mobile First, and what you can do to optimize your website for the mobile era. Podcast here

#79. OMG! Lawyers are Texting?

Twenty years ago, lawyers were debating whether to use email in their practices. It’s now impossible to imagine lawyers practicing without using email. Studies indicate that eight trillion text messages were sent in 2011. Will we see texts and IMs becoming as integral to law practice as email has become? In this episode, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the growing use of texts and IMs by everyone, how these technologies are starting to play a role in the everyday practice of law, and how lawyers should prepare for the use of these technologies in the future. Podcast here

#78. Turning TECHSHOW Topics into a Technology Agenda

Each Spring, ABA TECHSHOW takes center stage as one of the premier legal technology conferences. While there is great value in attending legal tech conferences, all lawyers can benefit simply by seeing what’s on the TECHSHOW agenda. Organizers put a lot of thought into their agendas, so we can all learn where to put our technology focus by seeing what topics these shows cover. Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell use TECHSHOW 2012 as an example of how to assess your current technological agenda, talk about the major topics being covered at TECHSHOW, and suggest ways you can use the TECHSHOW topic list to set your technology priorities for 2012. Podcast here

#77. New iPad, New Decisions

Apple just announced the newest version of the iPad, setting the Internet abuzz with anticipation and speculation. Is this the next big thing? More importantly, must this be your next tech purchase? In this episode, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the new iPad announcement and reactions, what the new iPad brings to the table, and whether lawyers should expect to see a new iPad in their possibly post-PC futures. Podcast here

#76. Future OS: Windows 8, Apple Mountain Lion and Beyond

Has it really been three years since the introduction of Windows 7? Surveys indicate that Windows XP users still outnumber Windows 7 users. Recent announcements indicate that we’ll be seeing both Windows 8 and a new Mac OSX update called Mountain Lion in 2012. In this episode, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell take a look at what we have now learned about operating system updates, the current state of operating systems, and what our future operating systems might look like. Podcast here

If you haven’t listened to the podcast before or haven’t listened for a while, give one or more of these a listen and then subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

View Dennis Kennedy's profile on LinkedIn

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

The new book Allison Shields and I have written called “LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers” is now available and also as an iBook. Also still available, The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

Recent Episodes of The Kennedy-Mighell Report Podcast

Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

I wanted to post an update on recent episodes of the Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast on the Legal talk Network.

There have been some very good episodes lately, on some great topics, and I wanted to highlight them. It’s also a good time to remind you that you can subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and receive new episodes automatically.

You don’t have to be a lawyer to listen to these podcasts. Tom and I try to cover a lot of ground that is not specific to lawyers. Episode #73 is just one good example.

I also wanted to note that the show notes site for the podcast at TKMReport.com is back to life and will give you descriptions, resources mentioned in the episodes and more.

RECENT EPISODES (#69 – #75)

#75. Search Plus Your Legal World

Google’s new “Search Plus Your World” represents a new direction in Internet search where social elements become part of our search results. Bringing our social media world into search results indicates both the growing importance of social media and the need to find new ways to get relevant results. Can we make use of what our friends and connections find on the web to get us better search results? In this episode, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell take a look at Search Plus Your World, whether bringing social into search might help us, and whether this approach might work for you. Podcast here

#74. Ultrabook Benefits for Attorneys

The big story at the 2012 Consumer Electronics Show was “ultrabooks.” This new category of computer stole the thunder, at least for a few days, from tablet computers. Should lawyers be considering ultrabooks in 2012? In this episode, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell take a look at the new world of ultrabooks, whether tablet computers like the iPad are taking over the computer market, and what it all means for traditional notebook computers and desktop PCs. Podcast here

#73. Making Collaboration Tools Work in 2012

People are collaborating more than ever before. There are more collaboration tools and technologies than ever before. Yet, the actual adoption of collaboration tools seems to lag behind the wish to use collaboration tools. In this episode, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the gap between tools and people in collaboration, the common challenges faced when implementing collaboration tools, especially ones used by lawyers, and their best recommendations for improving the adoption of collaboration tools and technologies in 2012. Podcast here

#72. Pardon the Legal Technology Interruption 2011

What kind of year was 2011 for legal tech? What were the big developments and trends that you need to know? In this episode, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell pay tribute to ESPN’s “Pardon the Interruption” and adopt its format for a fast-paced and fun discussion of what transpired in legal technology in 2011. Podcast here

#71. Who Moved My Social Media Cheese?

Many social media users have been surprised recently by changes to the design and user interface of the web pages and apps they have been accustomed to using with these services. These changes have been happening for quite a while, but this round of revision seems to have created a backlash from longtime users. Are these kinds of changes fair or foul? In this episode, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss recent interface modifications by Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and others, the response to these changes and the rollout of the changes, and the implications for users as rely more and more on cloud services. Podcast here

#70. 2012 Technology Gift Guide

‘Tis the season for gift-giving. And the season for technology gift lists. The latest technology is always a great present – especially for lawyers. In this episode, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell roll out their own technology gift guide for lawyers, give some of their favorite buying tips, and give you plenty of suggestions for your own wish list! Podcast here

#69. Will Video Kill the Lawyer Star?

Forty-eight hours of video is added to YouTube every minute. Second graders make professional-quality movies using inexpensive cameras and standard software. It’s no surprise that lawyers are tentatively beginning to think about using video in connection with their practices. In this episode, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the growing use of video by lawyers, survey the tools for creating and distributing videos, and share some observations and tips about lawyers jumping into the world of video. Podcast here

If you haven’t listened to the podcast before or haven’t listened for a while, give one or more of these a listen and then subscribe to the podcast in iTunes.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell.

qrcode

Announcing the 2011 Blawggie Awards

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

Welcome to the 2011 edition of Dennis Kennedy’s annual Best of Law-related Blogging Awards, affectionately known as the “Blawggies.”

The Blawggies, which honor the best law-related blogs as determined from my personal and highly-opinionated perspective, were first unleashed on an unsuspecting blogosphere in December 2004 and are an annual tradition here at DennisKennedy.Blog.

I’m very pleased that this eighth edition of the awards makes them the longest running annual awards list for law-related blogs selected by a lawyer named Dennis Kennedy living in St. Louis, Missouri – just a crazy idea that has turned into a bit of an institution in the world of law-related blogging.

I’ve included some explanatory and historical information about the Blawggies at the end of this post. As I’ve said before and explain in more detail at the end of this post, the Blawggies are not based on any popular votes, surveys or, God forbid, objective criteria. They are highly-opinionated choices made by me alone as I write this post.

Longtime readers will note that I’ve dropped a few categories from last year, in large part because of the continuing movement of bloggers away from blogging to social media and the impact that’s had on blawgs. And, in no small part, it’s because, as I describe below, because I base these awards on blawgs I actually read.

Executive Summary.

Spoiler Alert Many people do not like long blog posts such as this one. Even fewer like long introductions to long blog posts, or reading through commentary to learn the award winners. What follows is the executive summary list of winners. If you’d like to keep up the level of suspense, you’ll want to scroll quickly past the summary list. If all you really want to know is whether I mention you or your blawg, hit control-F and search for your name or your blawg’s name.

Here’s the list of the award winners. I will encourage you to read the whole post for details and the runner-up choices, and my thoughts about the blawgs.

2010 Blawggie Award Categories and Winners.


1. Best Overall Law-Related Blog – Adam Smith, Esq.

2. The “Marty Schwimmer” Best Practice-Specific Legal Blog – Ken Adams’s The Koncise Drafter

3. Best Law Practice Management Blog – Law21.ca

4. Best Legal Blog Category – Law Librarian Blogs

5. The “Kennedy-Mighell Report” Best Legal Podcast – The Unbillable Hour Podcast

6. The “Sherry Fowler” Best Writing on a Blawg Award – Tie, Tom Mighell and Allison Shields

7. Best Law Professor Blog – Tie: Paul Caron’s The TaxProf Blog and Jim Maul’s Mauled Again

8. The “DennisKennedy.Blog” Best Legal Technology Blog – Ron Friedmann’s Strategic Legal Technology

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I encourage you to keep reading this post to learn about the winning blogs (and why I felt that they were winners) and about the runners-up.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

THE 2011 BLAWGGIE AWARDS

1. Best Overall Law-Related Blog – Adam Smith, Esq.

Bruce MacEwen’s recent post pointing out that he didn’t consider Adam Smith, Esq. a “blawg,” rather an “online publication,” only cemented my decision to give Bruce (and his Adam Smith, Esq. partner, Janet Stanton) this award for 2011. While Adam Smith, Esq.’s coverage of the legal profession from an economic perspective has a depth most do not associate with blogs, I won’t debate the semantics of the term “blawg,” but I will say that I’m happy any day a post from Adam Smith, Esq. shows up in my Google Reader. I appreciate the detailed, boundary-pushing analysis of the economics of legal practice and other issues, and the sometimes surprising, but always thoughtful, insights. Always a rewarding read.

Runner-up – Jordan Furlong’s Law21.ca – Jordan Furlong covers law practice and the legal professions with insight, creativity and a willingness to challenge business-as-usual approaches. As I’ve said before, if you want to get the jump on what people will be talking about a year or two from now, you’ll want to read what Jordan is writing today.

2. The Marty Schwimmer Best Practice-Specific Blog – Ken Adams’s The Koncise Drafter

A repeat winner, legal drafting expert Ken Adams covers every aspect of improving contract drafting. If you ever find yourself in a debate over whether you need to say “indemnify AND hold harmless,” this blawg will be the resource you will want to know. A recent post delved into the use of “sole and absolute discretion.” His blog is the premier resource for transactional lawyers who draft and review contracts, and it would also be useful for litigators who need help in interpreting specific contract language. More importantly, Ken is leading the charge for clear and concise contract language.

[Note #1: This category is named for Marty Schwimmer, whose Trademark Blog, has long been my gold standard for what a practice-specific blog should be. Note #2: This category illustrates how my choices are based on blogs I actually read and my own subject matter areas, and should give you a reason to create your own awards to highlight the best blawgs in your practice areas.]

Runner-up – In House Blog – In House Blog is one of the rare group blogs that works for me. It’s a nice selection of posts of information of general interest to in house counsel, with enough helpful information to make it useful without feeling overwhelming.

3. Best Law Practice Management Blog – Jordan Furlong’s Law21.ca

I couldn’t bear the thought of giving Jordan two runner-up awards. Jordan makes you think. He questions standard law practice management approaches and challenges business as usual think. He also makes helpful recommendations. If you want to get a head-start on how law practices will be managed in the future, you’ll want to consider what Jordan is writing today.

Runner-up – Jim Calloway’s Law Practice Management Tips Blog – Jim Calloway has a voice that is perfectly tuned to solo and small firm lawyers. His common sense and practical tips and commentary also speak to a wider audience. I learn something from Jim’s posts on a regular basis. Jim is the Practice Management Advisor of the Oklahoma Bar, a popular author and speaker, and one of the most knowledgeable experts on law practice management you will ever find. Think of him as the genuinely helpful teacher you wish you could have had – now you can. I’m happy to call him a friend, too.

4. Best Legal Blog Category – Law Librarian Blogs

I use this category to highlight the blogs written by law librarians, a category that I don’t think gets enough attention. These blogs are places to find great information, help for finding information, links to great resources and just plain interesting insights into topics like knowledge management and our changing world of information. If you want to try just one, Sabrina Pacifici’s BeSpacific Blog provides a steady stream of links to great US government information. The Law Librarian Blog is a great starting place and there’s a great list of law library blogs here.

Runner-up – Non-US Law-related Blogs – I also use this category to remind people that Blawgging is a global phenomenon. There are many great United Kingdom blawgs and, as longtime readers know, I’m a huge fan of Canadian bloggers. As I’ve said before, “If you only have US blogs on your reading list, you need to go global.” Diversity is a good thing. Why not start in Canada? The annual Clawbie awards will give you a starter list.

5. The Kennedy-Mighell Report Best Legal Podcast – Rodney Dowell’s Unbillable Hour Podcast

[Disclosure: Our podcast, The Kennedy-Mighell Report, is produced by the Legal Talk Network and I’m an unabashed fan of the production team at LTN. That has no impact on my choice, but you might wish to factor that into account and it gives me another chance to remind you that these awards are my personal, opinionated choices. I used to get some criticism for giving myself awards or naming awards after me on this list (in fact, I still do), but, as I've explained before, most of the reason for that stems from my longtime experience of seeing lists I made republished without attribution or linkbacks. Adding myself to the list is a way to make sure that someone finds his or her way back to my work if the list is "repurposed."]

There are many great legal podcasts and it’s difficult to choose just one, but I’ve chosen Rodney Dowell’s Unbillable Hour podcast this year. Rodney Dowell has interviewed a series of great guests in 2011 (including me talking about listening to podcasts). I really like his interviewing style and, even when I’m not sure I’m interested in the topics, his guests are excellent and Rodney brings out some great comments from them. His enthusiasm is very apparent.

Runner-up – The Legal Talk Network Family of Podcasts – I went with my heart and chose the whole family of blogs on the Legal Talk Network, the best one-stop shop for law-related podcasts. This family of podcasts includes the “granddaddy” of legal podcasts, Lawyer to Lawyer with Bob Ambrogi and Craig Williams (congratulations on hitting Episode 300 this year!), and excellent podcasts from Rodney Dowell, Monica Bay, Sharon Nelson and John Simek, and others. With consistently great production values, top-notch hosts and great topics, LTN is the place to go for legal podcasts. This award is, in part, a small way to thank LuAnn Reeb, Kate Kenney and the whole LTN team for all the great work they do.

6. The Sherry Fowler Best Writing on a Blawg Award – Tie, Tom Mighell for Inter-Alia, TKMReport.com and iPad4Lawyers; Allison Shields for the LegalEase Blog

I’m a big fan of the pure writing ability of some of the best blawggers. I named this award after the legal blogger who had the biggest influence on my blog writing, Sherry “Scheherezade” Fowler (who hasn’t been a lawyer blogger for many years). This is my favorite of the Blawggies, my most-opinionated award, and the one I historically get most criticized for. The bottom line: I like the writing I like.

This year, I decided to single out two of my writing collaborators. Tom Mighell revamped his main blog, revitalized our podcast show notes blog and started a new blog for his iPad in One Hour for Lawyers book. Tom has such a great, seemingly-effortless style that’s very hard to duplicate. For example, he writes a daily post describing his “Blawg of the Day.” It seems so simple, but it is so hard to write these little summaries and do them on a regular basis. Just try it.

Allison Shields is co-authoring a new book with me to be called “LinkedIn in One Hour for Lawyers,” that will be published in the spring. I’ve always enjoyed Allison’s practical approach and conversational style. I told Allison recently that I liked the way she could take a topic and make it accessible to a novice, yet, at the same time, provide something for advanced readers and give people a thing or two to think about, all in a concise package. It’s been a pleasure to write the book with Allison and I strongly recommend her blog and email newsletter to you.

7. Best Law Professor Blog – Tie: Paul Caron’s The TaxProf Blog and Jim Maul’s Mauled Again

The Blawggies have always had a spot for the best law professor blawg and now that I’m a contributing editor to the Legal Skills Prof Blog on the great Law Professor Blog Network, I feel I’m much closer to this category than ever before. In part, it’s my little effort to bridge the great divide between practicing lawyers and law professors.

I have repeat winners here. To me, the test of a great blog is how it keeps me returning to it time after time because of its great posts when it’s outside my subject matter. Jim and Paul both do a great both of covering the tax beat, with welcome excursions into legal education, the economic crisis and other areas. Both show how to write a blog with an academic focus and a a real world impact.

Runner-up – Eric Goldman’s Technology & Marketing Law Blog – Eric’s blawg covers my own area of work – information technology law and related and intellectual property law issues with gusto, style and excellent insights, all done in a way that keeps touch with the real world. Very helpful.

8. The DennisKennedy.Blog Best Legal Technology Blog – Ron Friedmann’s Strategic Legal Technology

As I mentioned, I used to give my own blog this award every year, in part because of the attribution issue I talk about in this post and in part because I thought some of my blogging friends got a laugh out of it. They did, but others didn’t, and, instead, I started the tradition of naming the award for my blog rather than having my blog win it. I still get some criticism for that, and my friends laugh even more at that.

When it comes to my own interests in legal technology, Ron Friedmann’s blog is my go-to blog. Ron and I have similar interests in and perspectives on legal technology and he’s great at posting about issues that intrigue me, like outsourcing, strategy and bigger issues. Although the solo and small firm market is not Ron’s target audience, his blog is a good place to get a sense of trends and big-picture issues.

Runner-up – Tie, Jeff Richardson’s iPhone J.D. and Vivian Manning’s Small City Law Firm Tech – I own an iPhone and an iPad. Jeff Richardson does a great job of covering the iOS waterfront from the perspective of the practicing lawyer. Jeff gives you developments, tips, news, apps recommendations and more. Vivian provides a great stream of article annotations, links, practical tips and observations on tech. I often find good information here.

9. Biggest Blawg Disappointment of the Year

I see this as my failing, not that of the blawgosphere. I simply do not have a winner of the best new blawg category. This probably reflects the great movement away from blogging to social media by distinct individual voices, as well as the continuing emphasis on niche, practice-oriented group blogs by law firms. If you aren’t in the audience for the topic area, you likely won’t follow the blog. I’m sad that I don’t have a winner, but invite you to mention your favorite blawg started in 2011 in the comments. And I’ll make a special effort to track down some new blawgs in 2012.

And there you have it – the 2011 Blawggie Awards.

I wish I could give awards to all the blawgs (and blogs) I like, but this post is already long enough (another Blawggie tradition). Once again, I encourage you to create your own awards (although I’d prefer that you not call them Blawggies – that makes me feel that you haven’t read my blog).

When it really comes down to it, the Blawggies are really my way of saying thank you to the blawgs I enjoy most. There are times when blogging can seem like a thankless pursuit, so remember that all bloggers welcome a thank you from readers from time to time.

Some Background on the Blawggies.

The Blawggies are not based on any popular votes, surveys or, God forbid, objective criteria. They are highly-opinionated choices made by me alone, based on my experience, expertise and likes and dislikes gained from nearly nine years of blogging and from reading blogs voraciously for a good number of years before that.

The reactions to the Blawggies have traditionally run the gamut from “who does this guy think he is?” to “if he’s so smart about blawgs, why didn’t he give my blawg an award?” to “who is Dennis Kennedy?”

Seriously, though, I’ve always wanted to do three things with the Blawggie awards:

1. To highlight the law-related blogs I read and like and to say thank you to those who write them.

2. To direct my readers to the law-related blogs I enjoy.

3. To prompt others to give their own awards so I can learn about other blogs I should be reading.

From the beginning, I expected that many bloggers would pick up on the idea and write their own awards posts. After all, there is no barrier to entry for posting your own awards. I thought that I could then get great recommendations for blogs to add to my reading list from other awards posts in much the same way you can get great recommendations for new music to listen to from the “best of the year” posts by music bloggers that appear at this time of year.

As I’ve said before, “When you realize that there is no reason that you can’t simply post your own awards, you move you from merely blogging to becoming a Blogger with a capital ‘B.’”

The best response to my list is to post your own list, although I do invite your comments and discussion about my list.

The Blawggie-winning Criteria.

I like blogs with (1) consistently useful content, (2) a generous and helpful approach, and (3) a combination of commitment, personality and talent, with an emphasis on good writing. In other words, I like blogs that compel me to read them on a regular basis.

The awards necessarily reflect my many biases and personal preferences, which are far too numerous to list here.

It’s very important to remember that the awards also reflect the blawgs I actually read. While I read a lot of law-related blogs, the number of blawgs I read continues to decrease and the number of non-law-related blogs I read increases. Also, the blawgs I do read are concentrated in my areas of interest and day-to-day focus.

I’m a transactional lawyer, who focuses on information technology law, legal technology and law practice management issues. For better or worse, I’m simply not familiar with most litigation-oriented, criminal defense, regulatory or other specialized blogs. You get the idea.

A Word about the Name “Blawggies.”

Among the historic documents of law-related blogging are a series of emails in which Denise Howell (@dhowell), blogging pioneer and coiner of the term “blawg,” and I had on the question whether “Blawggies” (as well as “blawgger” and “blawgging”) should be spelled with one or two “gs”. As a result, I’m pretty confident of the correct spelling, although I’m seeing more of the single “g” approach lately.

I use the word “blawg” in the sense of “law-related blogs.” I find “lawyer blogs” or “legal blogs” to be limiting and inaccurate for what I want to cover.

All best wishes for 2012.

Dennis

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

qrcode