Technology-Lawyer

Dennis Kennedy

Technology Law and Legal Technology. Dennis Kennedy is one of the few technology lawyers who is also an expert on the underlying technologies. Dennis an award-winning leader in the application of technology and the Internet to the practice of law. DennisKennedy.com gives you access to a wide variety of Dennis Kennedy's resources on legal technology, his writings, his well-known blog, DennisKennedy.Blog, and information about how you can have Dennis speak to your organization or group.

Dennis Kennedy is one of the most knowledgeable legal technologists you will find. - Michael Arkfeld.

Dennis Kennedy, a lawyer and legal technology expert in St. Louis, Mo., has been a significant influence in the ever-evolving relationship between lawyers and the Web. - Robert Ambrogi

Posts Tagged ‘legal’

Recent Episodes of The Kennedy-Mighell Report Podcast

Sunday, April 3rd, 2011

LinkedIn. Backing up. The iPad 2. Beyond Keyword Search.

I thought I’d get you caught up on recent podcasts. Tom Mighell and I have recorded several episodes of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast since I’ve last posted about podcasts on this blog. They are now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here.

We’ve moved past the 50 episode mark, added another great sponsor (Carbonite Pro), and, I think, done some of our best work. I invite to listen to the recent episodes, to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and send us your questions and ideas for future topics.

Here’s a list of the last four episodes (in reverse chronological order) with the program descriptions:

What Comes After Keyword Search?

Despite all the talk about “search” on the web, the simple fact is that we’d trade all the “search” in the world for a lot more “find.” The good news is that there are some developments that will help us get the information we want when we want it. In this episode, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss what comes after traditional keyword search, new tools and techniques like recommendation engines and apps, and whether we are getting closer to being able to truly get the information we want when we want it. (Episode 52)

This podcast grew out of our recent perception that regular Google searching is increasingly unsatisfying. We talk a look at current and future alternatives, with a big emphasis on social search. In the second segment, we talk about our upcoming presentations at IgniteLaw 2011 on April 10.

Climbing Aboard the iPad 2 Train

The first iPad was incredibly successful and the launch of the iPad 2 has created a fresh surge of interest in the tablet category. Is the iPad 2 the tablet device that lawyers have been waiting for? In this episode, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss their experiences in line at the Apple Store on Opening Day attempting to get the freshest information for their audience, talk about their early experiences with the iPad 2, and speculate about the “post-PC era,” the iPad 2 and its potential impact on lawyers and their clients. (Episode 51)

In this podcast, Tom and I decided it would be fun to try to get a new iPad 2 on launch night and report about our experiences. Tom was successful. I wasn’t. In fact, I had to give up on trying to get one at the Apple Store and am still waiting for mine to be shipped to me. Fortunately, Tom, who has written a new iPad for lawyers book, is able to share his real-world experiences, while I rely on what I’ve read and heard. In the second segment, we talk about the new social media phenomenon of group messaging, especially at conferences, and whether we think any of these services will catch on at ABA TECHSHOW in April.

You ARE Backing Up, Right?

Everyone (well, we hope everyone) knows data backup is important. That’s why we always vow to be more diligent after we lose more data at an inopportune time. Data backup has become more complicated over the past few years as our data moves out from our computers to the cloud. We know what to do, so why don’t we? (Episode 50

Tom had an issue with his blog where it looked liked he might have lost about a year’s worth of posts. Fortunately, they were restored, but it reminded us how important backup still is. We discuss new approaches that make backing up your data empire easier and cheaper than ever – if you’ll actually pay attention and make the backups. In the second segment, we talk about recent changes Google made to its search algorithm.

The Land of LinkedIn

Lawyers can’t go a single day without hearing how they need to be using social media. Social media, however, is a big topic and there are lots of social media tools. The tool lawyers most commonly use is LinkedIn, but are they really using it to good advantage? (Episode 49)

As I recall, the title was a hat tip to Lincoln’s birthday. Lately, I’ve been thinking that brad-based presentations to lawyers about “social media” are becoming less useful. Better, I think, to focus on one of the social media tools and cover it in depth. We delve into how we use LinkedIn and how you might use it better. In the second segment, we get a report from Tom about his trip to the 2011 LegalTech NY conference.

I invite you to listen to the episodes that interest you. I also recommend that you subscribe to the podcast through iTunes to get new episodes as they are released (and not wait until I post about recent episodes on this blog).

Let us know what you think about episodes. And try some of the other back episodes as well. Although we’re working on some technical issues (please be patient), the show notes for the podcast can be found at www.tkmreport.com.

We always welcome your questions and will try to answer them on episodes.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

IgniteLaw 2011 and The Freemium Practice of Law

Monday, March 7th, 2011

I was disappointed not to be able to attend the first IgniteLaw in 2010, although close observers will catch my very brief virtual appearance on the video from last year. I’m planning to make it to the recently-announced IgniteLaw 2011 that will happen on April in Chicago on the evening before the start of the 25th ABA TECHSHOW.

IgniteLaw (“The Future of Law Practice, in 6 minute increments”) is presented by my friends Matt Homann (LexThink) and JoAnna Forshee (InsideLegal). IgniteLaw uses the popular “Ignite” format with speakers getting 6 minutes to present with 20 automatically-advancing slides. The videos from last year will give you an idea of what to expect.

I thought it would be fun to come up with a possible presentation. While my first choice was to do a dramatic re-enactment of Doug Sorocco’s tremendous presentation from last year, I quickly realized that Doug’s presentation simply cannot be duplicated. We have to talk Doug into coming back this year.

The topic idea I submitted is called “The Freemium Practice of Law” and here is the description I wrote:

Richard Susskind meets Chris Anderson meets Larry Lessig on the road to new legal business models based on the notion of “Freemium.” How might lawyers give away traditional core services and products (think documents) to generate new flows of income, happy clients and personally-fulfilling work using technology readily-at-hand, Open Source principles, and new technology on the horizon?

I wanted to pull together some provocative ideas I’ve thought about off and on for the last couple of years, but haven’t written about or presented before. The talk would take me into some different areas than I’ll be presenting on at TECHSHOW (collaboration tools for transactional lawyers and Open Source software for law firms).

I’m excited about this topic and presentation. So much so that I’ve already sketched out the slides for the presentation. There’s a voting process for IgniteLaw, so I’m hopeful that my topic gets picked.

If you will be in Chicago on April 10 (for TECHSHOW or otherwise), I encourage you to attend IgniteLaw 2011. Tickets are free, seats are limited, and the information you need about tickets is here. Hope to see you there. I’ll be pestering you about going to TECHSHOW and talking a bit more about my presentations there in a future post.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter ñ @dkennedyblog. Follow me ñ @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

Catching Up on Kennedy-Mighell Report Podcasts

Monday, February 14th, 2011

Tom Mighell and I have recorded several episodes of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast since I’ve last posted about podcasts on this blog. They are now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here.

Here’s a list (in reverse chronological order) with the program descriptions:

To Cloud or Not to Cloud: That is the Question for Start-up Firms

You’re starting a new firm, or you want to revamp your existing firm’s technology. What approaches and strategies make the most sense for the 10-20 lawyer firm in 2011? Is the “cloud” part of your firm’s immediate future? In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell take a look at some of the technology options for smaller firms, the long term strategies and short-term tactics that should be considered, and the role cloud computing can play in todayís legal technology environment. (Episode 48)

A New Start: Legal Technology Resolutions for 2011

The new year is the perfect time to breathe some life into your approach to technology. Even small accomplishments can bring you big results. Where should you begin and what priorities should you set? In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell survey what technology resolutions lawyers are making for 2011, how to narrow down your list of choices, and, most importantly, how best to make your technology resolutions come true. (Episode 47)

Asked and Answered

What are the hot questions in legal technology today? In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell take on audience questions on legal technology and give you their best answers. (Episode 46)

Whatís the Word for Legal Tech in 2010?

Did technology rock the legal world in 2010 or was it a sleepy little year for legal tech? What were the tech highlights and lowlights for 2010? In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell offer up a wide-ranging, fast-paced and highly-opinionated review of what transpired in legal technology in 2010. (Episode 45)

I really like all of these recent episodes (and the next one we’ve recorded on LinkedIn) and am grateful for the steady increases we’re seeing in downloads of the podcast. I recommend that you subscribe to the podcast through iTunes to get new episodes as they are released.

Of the recent batch of four episodes listed above, I really enjoyed the episode called Whatís the Word for Legal Tech in 2010? (Episode 45). In this episode, we did a tribute to one of our favorite podcasts: ESPN’s Pardon the Interruption (PTI). We based on review of legal tech in 2011 on the style of PTI and designed segments around familiar segments of PTI. Fun and informative.

Let us know what you think about episodes. And try some of the other back episodes as well. Although we’re working on some technical issues (please be patient), the show notes for the podcast can be found at www.tkmreport.com.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter ñ @dkennedyblog. Follow me ñ @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

Tech Resolutions for 2011

Thursday, January 27th, 2011

The ABA Journal has published my latest monthly legal technology column. It’s called “Happy New Tech Year: 4 First Steps for the Next 365 Days” and, as you might gather from the title, it makes some recommendations for “new year’s resolutions” you might make about technology from 2011.

Although, I make a few specific suggestions (e.g., change all of your passwords), the article focuses on the notion of how to make good resolutions and to focus on what makes the most sense for you.

As I say in the column, “Think of resolutions as first steps that are simple, easy to accomplish and targeted toward areas that will reduce friction between you and the rapidly changing world of technology.”

I highlight four areas you might want to focus on for 2011.

1. Protect Yourself. Examples include change all of your passwords or get a password management program.

2. Spruce Up Your Online Presence. Examples include refreshing your design, updating pictures and visiting your profiles on online directories.

3. Learn. Pick a technology topic, program or feature (track changes, email management, PowerPoint) and take a class or find other ways to learn it well. Or subscribe to a podcast like The Kennedy-Mighell Report to keep up-to-date on legal technology developments and topics.

4. Innovate. I like to try one new technology every year. I think this is my year of the Mac. 2011 might be a good year for you to try a cloud computing application.

The money quote:

Technology is definitely complicated, but lawyers have to keep up. The best way is to have some written resolutions that help you take small steps. Go for easy wins, build momentum and surprise peopleóincluding yourselfówith how far you can go in 2011.

Check out the article here.

Tom Mighell and I also discuss this topic, with a strong focus on how to make resolutions that you will actually complete, in a recent episode of the Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter ñ @dkennedyblog. Follow me ñ @denniskennedy

The Lawyerís Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

Your Questions Answered in Next Kennedy-Mighell Report Podcast

Friday, December 24th, 2010

NOTE: The podcast mentioned in this post can now be found here.

I’ve been able to talk Tom into doing our next episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast as an all question-and-answer show where we try to answer legal tech questions from our listeners (and readers of this blog).

Now all we need is a show’s worth of questions to answer.

That’s where you come in.

Send us your questions in the next couple of days by leaving a comment on this post, by emailing me (denniskennedyblog @ gmail.com) or my direct messaging Tom (@tommighell) or me (@dkennedyblog) on Twitter.

Any topic is fair game. If you wanted to try this, you might record your question as an audio file and we’ll try to insert it into the show.

Also, please let us know whether you want us to mention your name on the episode.

Thanks for your help and thanks for listening to the podcast in 2010. We’re especially proud of of last episode, “What’s the Word for Legal Tech in 2010,” which is an homage to one of our favorite podcasts (and one that was inspiration for our podcast, ESPN’s Pardon the Interruption (PTI) podcast.

A special thanks, too, for all the positive feedback I’ve received on my 2010 Blawggie Awards post.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

MacGyver Your Software

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

The ABA Journal has published my latest monthly legal technology column. It’s called “MacGyver Your Software: Necessity Reveals Useful Tools You Never Knew Your Software Had.” It covers some ways you can cleverly make use of the standard programs you have to do some things that you thought only programs you don’t have could do.

As I say in the column,

I have noticed that many lawyers who make innovative use of technology in their practices take advantage of program features not commonly used by others. Often, this results from the lack of budget or permission to install new programs. Necessity becomes the mother of invention.

Those of you famility with TV history (and who isn’t?) will get the reference to MacGyver, who could also make some amazing new use out of seemingly random materials at hand to escape from difficult situations.

Many lawyers with limited technology tools have felt like a MacGyver trying to cobble together software and hardware to accomplish something that technology they didn’t have would easily do.

The premise of this column is to take a look at ways you can use common tools for quite different purposes, not just give you some tips to use existing programs better.

Some examples include using your word processor as a metadata scrubber or blog publishing tool, presentation programs as a graphics editor or audio/video editor and Adobe Acrobe for a wide variety of purposes.

The idea is to get you to think in new ways and not to throw your hands up in despair because your firm won’t let you get tools you need. There are other options.

The money quote from the column:

Now is a great time to explore the unused features in software you already have. If you unleash your inner MacGyver, do some exploring and are willing to be creative, you are likely to find a much bigger and better-stocked toolbox than you ever imagined.

Check out the article here.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

Big Answers for Mid-Sized Law Firm Problems – Podcast

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “Big Answers for Mid-Sized Problems” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Clio. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – consider trying out an episode or becoming a regular subscriber through iTunes or our RSS feed.

We have a special guest host for this episode – our friend Catherine Sanders Reach, Director of the < "http://www.abanet.org/tech/ltrc/home.html">American Bar Association’s Legal Technology Resource Center.

Here’s the episode (#44) description:

There are lots of technology resources and conferences for large firms and small firms. Mid-sized law firms often feel that needed information and resources can be difficult or even impossible to find. Where can mid-sized firms get appropriately-focused technology assistance? In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell and special guest host, Catherine Sanders Reach talk about the unique issues mid-sized law firms face, suggest practical steps those firms can take to address those issues, and discuss ways to improve the legal technology landscape for mid-sized firms.

I’ve long felt that the most underserved area of legal technology is the unique needs and issues faced by mid-sized law firms and legal organizations. If you are in a small firm or a big firm, you’ll find a lot of resources and conferences. However, it’s difficult to find resources (or conferences) focused on mid-sized firms. I keep thinking that I’d like to create a “portal” to resources for mid-sized firms in my spare time. Then again, I keep thinking that I’ll have some spare time to do that.

We brought Catherine in not just because we like her and think she is one of the most knowledgeable people out there, but because the ABA’s Legal Technology Resource Center has survey information and other data that give us some insights into the mid-sized market.

We start with a definition of mid-sized firms that moves from my “mid-sized is a state of mind” approach to a more practical definition of 10 – 100 lawyers, that breaks into two categories – 10 to 49, and 50 to 100.

There are a number of issues that begin to separate mid-sized firms from small firms – IT employees, sophistication of applications, tech committees, to name a few.

Catherine does a great job of highlighting key findings from the most recent ABA survey and looking at historical trends. If you deal with technology in a mid-sized firm, you’ll want to hear this information.

We also give a few suggestions for mid-sized firms and realize that this is a topic we’ll come back to in a future podcast.

I’ve become quite worried about mid-sized firms in today’s market and some of the issues they face. Technology might not be the most difficult one, but it’s well up on the list. Our podcast will give you some ideas, but providing education and resources for mid-sized firms should get a bigger share of the legal technology discussion than it seems to be getting today.

In our “stuff Tom and Dennis having been talking about” segment, we include Catherine and take a look at some recent surveys in Macintosh use by lawyers and discuss whether or not Macs are starting to make inroads into law offices. Perhaps the most interesting point is that the growing use of Macs by lawyers (and their family members) might have implications for future Mac use in law firms, especially as we see growing interest in the “Bring Your Own Computer” approach to work technology.

We end the episode with our Parting Shots segment, in which we give a couple of useful tips. Tom talks about Google’s new Cloud Connect. Catherine has a very useful Outlook tip. I mention TechnoLawyer as an excellent resource for mid-sized firm lawyers, as is the ABA’s Legal Technology Resource Center.

Let us know what you think about this episode. Show notes for the podcast are here. And try some of the back episodes as well. I recommend subscribing to the podcast on iTunes so you automatically get each new episode as it is released. You can also now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

One Inbox to Rule Them All – Podcast

Monday, December 13th, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “One Inbox to Rule Them All” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Clio. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – consider trying out an episode or becoming a regular subscriber through iTunes or our RSS feed.

Here’s the episode (#43) description:

Facebook has just announced its new Facebook Messages, which has been referred to as “Facebook email” or a “Gmail killer.” It’s not exactly email, but it does aim to centralize all of our messaging in the Facebook platform. Given Facebook’s scope, is this a game-changer? In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell take a look at Facebook Messages and its implications, how social media and webmail are changing our relationship to email, and whether Facebook Messages or other forms of webmail are in your future. After you listen,

I keep hearing myself say this year that is “email is broken.” Facebook Messages is the latest high visibility effort to radically change the way we use email. In part, it’s a way to give you a Facebook email address, but, more so, it’s a way to bring email, instant messages, Facebook messages and the like into a unified inbox.

We were a little wary of any high-profile “email replacement” after Google Wave fizzled out, but we explored some of the potential advantages and disadvantages of a Facebook-based approach, including potential electronic discovery issues and reservations about giving Facebook even more of our information.

I’m intrigued by the idea of a unified inbox or social media dashboard, whether it might be Facebook Messages or something yet to come. Whether or not Facebook Messages is the right answer or not, the fact is that anything available to Facebook’s 500 million users simply cannot be ignored. You’ll want to watch developments in Facebook Messages before they sneak up on you.

In our “stuff Tom and Dennis having been talking about” segment, we take a look at our practical experiences with e-book readers and share the ways we have found them useful. Tom, a longtime user of the Kindle, also talks about his experience with the iPad as an ebook reader.

We end the episode with our Parting Shots segment, in which we give a couple of useful tips. Tom talks about the Rockmelt Browser, a new browser that incoporates social media. I was dubious about a new browser, but Tom managed to get me interested in trying it, even though I haven’t started yet. I recommend the Canadian Broadcasting Company’s Spark podcast, a weekly radio show hosted by Nora Young that covers technology and its many consequences in an engaging, entertaining and educational way. I especially liked episode 127.

Let us know what you think about this episode. Show notes for the podcast are here. And try some of the back episodes as well. I recommend subscribing to the podcast on iTunes so you automatically get each new episode as it is released. You can also now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

Integrating Practice Management Tools in Law School

Monday, November 15th, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “Integrating Practice Management Tools in Law School” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Clio. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – consider trying out an episode or becoming a regular subscriber through iTunes or our RSS feed.

Here’s the episode (#42) description:

With law firms cutting back or eliminating summer internships and law schools focusing on teaching theoretical legal concepts, law students find themselves in a difficult position in a difficult market. How can law students learn needed practical skills, including how to use legal technology? In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell talk to Professor Clark D. Cunningham from Georgia State University College of Law, Jonathan Call, law school student at GSU College of Law, Jack Newton from Clio and Andy Adkins from the University of Florida Levin College of Law, about the exciting and innovative efforts to bring practical skills training, including legal technology, to law schools and law students.

Tom and I have long had an interest in ways education about legal technology can be improved for lawyers and law students. I especially enjoy the chances I get to talk to law students about legal technology. In addition, Tom and I are contributing editors for the new Legal Skills Prof Blog, part of the great Law Professor Blogs Network.

When we learned about the experiment the Georgia State University College of Law was doing with our podcast sponsor, Clio, we decided that it was a perfect topic for the podcast. A big thank you to Christy Burke and the great team at LegalTalkNetwork (especially the fabulous Kate Kenney), we put together a big show with four guests to talk about the project, put it in context, and, we hope, point to ways other schools might try similar experiments.

We divided the episode into two segments. In the first, we get an “on the ground” report on the Georgia State University School of Law experiment from Professor Cunningham and Jonathan Call. In the second, Jack Newton of Clio gives us his observations and insights from the vendor perspective and our good friend, Andy Adkins, adds his vast knowledge and perspective to talk about where this experiment fits into the history of bringing technology to law students, law professors and law schools.

This is exciting stuff. And it’s important work. If we are going to significant change in the use of technology in the legal profession, it is likely to evolve from these types of experiments to get the next generation of tools into the hands of the next generation of lawyers.

The one great insight I got from this conversation, and I should have thought of this before, is that because cloud-based tools can be used in schools without the need for additional computer infrastructure, it’s possible to move quickly on these types of initiatives.

A big “thank you” to all our guests. Let us know what you think about this episode.

We end the podcast with a Parting Shot about our involvement with the Legal Skills Prof Blog and how we are excited to be part of that project. Check out the blog here.

Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think. Show notes for the podcast are here. And try some of the back episodes as well. You can also now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

Top Tech Tips for Today’s Travelers – Podcast

Thursday, November 11th, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “Top Tech Tips for Today’s Travelers” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Clio. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – consider trying out an episode or becoming a regular subscriber through iTunes or our RSS feed.

Here’s the episode (#41) description:

Traveling with technology today has, simultaneously, gotten both easier and harder. On the road, you need to be resourceful and give yourself plenty of options to meet unexpected challenges. At the same time, you still want to “pack light.” In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell share their notes and experiences from a recent trip, offer some of their best travel tips, and make a few predictions about where traveling with technology is headed.

Tom and I had just returned from a great trip to Washington, DC for the American Bar Association’s Law Practice Management Section’s fall meetings. We had compared notes with other attendees about what we have learned about traveling with technology over the years. We thought it would be fun and instructive to share some of our favorite travel tips and observations with our listeners.

We talked a bit about how our traveling styles differ. It’s essential to have a good understanding of your own style, what technology you actually use, and what you really want to accomplish. From that base, you can make smart choices about what you need for each trip.

Tom and I joked a bit about how your bag is really the most important “technology” tool you need, but it’s clear that your choice of computer bag (or backpack) can be important. My big observation from my recent trip was how valuable a sportscoat with lots of pockets can be.

We talk about Internet connections, power cords, the rise of smartphones and much more. Tom also gives his opinion on whether you can travel with an iPad and no laptop. We also talk about software and Internet services we find useful while traveling.

When traveling, I’m a big believer in giving yourself a number of options while still consolidating what you take down to the acceptable minimum. You have to be resourceful and be prepared for the unexpected. In the podcast, you’ll hear lots of our practical tips, both those that we have learned the hard way and what we’ve learned as helpful advice from travelers we know.

In our “stuff Tom and I have been talking about” segment, we discussed the upcoming 25th anniversary of the ABA TECHSHOW, the promotional video we shot for TECHSHOW, and the value of attending legal technology conferences.

We end the podcast with our Parting Shots – practical tips you can use right away. Tom recommended Google’s Gmail Security Checklist. I like a post from Dave Taylor that explains how to download your personal information from Facebook.

Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think. Show notes for the podcast are here. And try some of the back episodes as well. You can also now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools