Technology-Lawyer

Dennis Kennedy

Technology Law and Legal Technology. Dennis Kennedy is one of the few technology lawyers who is also an expert on the underlying technologies. Dennis an award-winning leader in the application of technology and the Internet to the practice of law. DennisKennedy.com gives you access to a wide variety of Dennis Kennedy's resources on legal technology, his writings, his well-known blog, DennisKennedy.Blog, and information about how you can have Dennis speak to your organization or group.

Dennis Kennedy is one of the most knowledgeable legal technologists you will find. - Michael Arkfeld.

Dennis Kennedy, a lawyer and legal technology expert in St. Louis, Mo., has been a significant influence in the ever-evolving relationship between lawyers and the Web. - Robert Ambrogi

Posts Tagged ‘open source’

Starting a Conversation about Open Source in Law Practice

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

At ABA TECHSHOW 2011, I got the opportunity to speak with Rodney Dowell on the topic of the “Open Source Powered Law Firm.” Rodney was great, the audience was engaged, and I really enjoyed the experience. Gwynne Monahan does a nice job of capturing the session in her post, “First Mac, then #cloudcomputing so perhaps #opensource #abatechshow.”

As I mentioned in the session, former Red Hat CEO Bob Young was a keynote speaker at ABA TECHSHOW 2000 and, I believe, this was the first TECHSHOW session since then to focus on Open Source software. Young’s talk inspired me to write a law review article on the Open Source licenses in 2001 (“A Primer on Open Source Licensing Legal Issues: Copyright, Copyleft and the Future,” 20 St. Louis Univ. Pub. L. Rev. 345 (2001)) and put together a list of web sources on Open Source legal issues. I’ve been interested in Free and Open Source software and the philosophy behind it ever since. If you Google my name and “Open Source” you’ll find some of my writings and a couple of podcasts (e.g., this podcast).

I’ve had the chance in 2011 to write one article and co-author with Gwynne Monahan another on the use of Open Source software in the practice of law.

The major article is the one with Gwynne that was recently published in the March/April 2011 issue of the ABA’s Law Practice magazine. It’s called “10 Tips for Getting Started with Open Source Software” and it’s meant to be a easy and practical introduction to Open Source Software and the role it might play in law practice. As you might guess from the title, it feature ten important practical tips.

In my monthly technology column for the American Bar Journal in March 2011, I wrote a short and concise introduction to Open Source software in law practice called “Free Can Be Good: Add Open Source to Software Considerations.” In the column, I conclude: “Open Source programs are be coming realistic alternatives for lawyers, especially for focused tasks. Now is a great time to add a consideration of Open Source software to your technology decision-making process.”

Through the presentation and the articles, I wanted to join with Gwynne and Rodney in raising the profile of Open Source software, highlighting its growing importance and introducing the philosophy and reality of Open Source software.

Open Source is about community. The articles and presentation are meant to start the conversation, but we also wanted to find ways to continue and extend the conversation about the use of Open Source software in the practice of law. One step in that direction is a new LinkedIn group called Open Source Tools for Law Practice. With luck, it will grow to help people find others interested in Open Source and offer a place for conversations. If you are interested in Open Source, please consider joining the group.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

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April Issue of Law Practice Today Features Diversity / Inclusion Theme

Monday, April 26th, 2010

The April issue of Law Practice Today, the webzine of the ABA’s Law Practice Management Section, is out. It focuses on practical aspects of diversity and inclusion in the practice of law and the legal profession.

It’s quite a collection of articles, from an excellent set of authors, that looks at diversity and inclusion from a variety of perspectives, with an emphasis on the practical, not the theoretical. Highly recommended.

As someone who helped co-found Law Practice Today and a current member of its board, I can hardly be expected to be objective about it, so I’ll point to Jim Calloway’s post about this issue. I also guest co-edited this issue, so all pretense of any objectivity goes out the door. But, I definitely think it’s a great issue.

The issue also contains two articles I wrote or co-wrote.

The first is co-written with Gwynne “@econwriter5” Monahan and is called “Will Free Fit into Your Technology Budget? An Open Source Software Primer for the Solo and Small Firm Lawyer.” I’ve wanted to write something introductory and practical about one of my favorite topics, Open Source, and was pleased that I could talk Gwynne into co-authoring the article with me. Gwynne is both very knowledgeable about Open Source and an excellent writer. Once again, I found out again how much I enjoy co-authoring. For more perpsectives on possible use of Open Source software in law practice, check out this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast, with my usual collaborator, Tom Mighell.

I also contributed a new article that suggests that diversification and portfolio management should be the primary foundation for defining technology strategies and choices. It’s called “Putting Diversification at the Center of Your Firm’s Technology Strategy-Using a Simple Grid Approach.” The article also offers a simple grid approach to setting strategy. I’d enjoy getting some feedback on that article.

We’ve gotten great feedback on the issue so far, so I encourage you to visit the issue and read all of the articles.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]