Technology-Lawyer

Dennis Kennedy

Technology Law and Legal Technology. Dennis Kennedy is one of the few technology lawyers who is also an expert on the underlying technologies. Dennis an award-winning leader in the application of technology and the Internet to the practice of law. DennisKennedy.com gives you access to a wide variety of Dennis Kennedy's resources on legal technology, his writings, his well-known blog, DennisKennedy.Blog, and information about how you can have Dennis speak to your organization or group.

Dennis Kennedy is one of the most knowledgeable legal technologists you will find. - Michael Arkfeld.

Dennis Kennedy, a lawyer and legal technology expert in St. Louis, Mo., has been a significant influence in the ever-evolving relationship between lawyers and the Web. - Robert Ambrogi

Posts Tagged ‘podcast’

Presumptuous Computing – Podcast

Monday, October 11th, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “Presumptuous Computing: But I Didn’t Ask for That” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Clio. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – consider trying out an episode or becoming a regular subscriber through iTunes or our RSS feed.

Here’s the episode (#39) description:

You go to Google and find the new “instant search” feature has been turned on for you. You upgrade a program and find that all of your personalized settings have been reset to the program defaults. Facebook changes privacy settings. Twitter surprises you with a new interface. Why do technology companies seem to think that they can make these changes for us? In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the idea of “presumptuous computing,” the rise and implications of this phenomenon, and what you can do to keep pace and protect yourself.

Three years ago, I wrote a blog post called “Presumptuous Computing – A Trend to Reverse,” in which I argued that too many software vendors were acting like they knew best about what we wanted and generally not acting like good guests on our computers. I had a whole laundy list of irritating examples, from Windows updates to iTunes.

Fast forward three years. While some things have gotten somewhat better (like Windows updates), there’s a whole new generation of programs and web-based services that annoyingly make changes to the user interface, default settings and other features without telling us, let alone giving us any choice.

Tom and I revisit the topic and our general annoyance with the practice and the attitude that “vendor knows best” that too often seems to underlie it. We cover a long list of examples – Google Instant, Google Buzz, Facebook privacy settings, iTunes. The trend simply hasn’t reversed.

We also talk about some practical ways to protect yourself and take better control of your our computer. As Tom says, “Read. Be Smart. Don’t Assume.”

In our Q&A segment, Tom and I answer a couple of questions about the the results from a couple of questions on the use of collaboration tools from the 2010 Inside Legal / ILTA Member Technology Purchasing Survey and specualte on trends in collaboration tools in law firms.

We end the podcast with our Parting Shots – practical tips you can use right away. Tom likes two iPhone/iPad apps for marking up PDFs – Signit! and iAnnotate. I recommend Olivia Mitchell’s blog post The Seven Types fo Presentations to Avoid.

Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think. Show notes for the podcast are here. And try some of the back episodes as well. You can also now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

Does Poor Technology Equal Poor Morale? – Podcast

Wednesday, September 22nd, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “Does Poor Technology Equal Poor Morale?” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Clio. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – consider trying out an episode or becoming a regular subscriber through iTunes or our RSS feed.

Here’s the episode (#38) description:

The word on the street is that associates and young partners are very unhappy with the state of technology in their law firms. The results of a new survey of associate satisfaction tells us just how unhappy associates might be. Or might not be. In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell dive into the results of the 2010 American Lawyer Associates Survey, what the answers reveal about how associates view technology and technology spending at their firms, and the ramifications for firms delaying technology upgrades.

In this episode, we focus on what conclusions we might be able to draw from the recently-released 2010 American Lawyer Associates Tech Survey, especially the results on associate satisfaction with technology.

Not surprisingly, the survey indicated that associates aren’t very happy with the state of technology in large firms. One notable exception is my former law firm, Thompson Coburn, which has topped the survey for several years. I mention some of the things I like about the approach their IT Director, Phil Rightler, has on addressing the technology needs of lawyers.

We note some of our observations about the impact of this dissatisfaction (retention issues) and some of the simple efforts that produce big results in dealing with technology dissatisfaction.

My big point: you have to LISTEN to what associates are saying and understand what motivates most of the complaints – the desire to have tools to help them do their work better.

If you unpack what is being said, you will see that in many, many cases, it boils down to having inadequate collaboration tools.

Charlie Mead’s article on the survey also gives you a strong sense of two trains heading in different directions – compare the concerns of associates with the comments from management. It’s no secret that lawyers do leave big firms to start their own firms in no small part due to frustration with technology. I see technology issues becoming a serious lawyer retention issue, especially if the economy improves.

In our Q&A session, Tom and I answer a couple of questions from our audience. Thanks to those of you sending us questions, espcialy those who responded to my call forquestions on Twitter. Send them to us at any time. First, Mike McBride asks if we see a connection between the survey finding we talked about in the main segment and the growth of “Shadow IT” tools like Google Docs in firms where there is dissatisfaction with technology. Yes, we do. Second, Matt Buchanan asks about the current thinking on using an online form of client engagement letter.

We end the podcast with our Parting Shots – practical tips you can use right away. Tom goes all Google, and raves about Gmail’s new priority inbox and the new instant search form of Google’s search engine. I note that Google Instant freaked me out so much that I turned it off immediately, and I pointed people to a couple of article about the “balkanization of the Internet” from the Economist (A virtual counter-revolution (the balkanisation of the internet)) and Wired (The Web is Dead – Long Live the Internet)

Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think. Show notes for the podcast are here. And try some of the back episodes as well. You can also now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

Where Everyone Knows Your Name AND Location – Podcast

Tuesday, September 7th, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “Geolocation: Where Everyone Knows Your Name AND Location” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Clio. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – consider trying out an episode or becoming a regular subscriber through iTunes or our RSS feed.

Here’s the episode (#37) description:

In real estate and on the Internet today, the key is location, location, location. Facebook Places, Google Latitude and Foursquare have opened our eyes to the potential benefits and concerns of geolocation services and features. Why are we voluntarily and publicly disclosing so much personal location information today? In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the growing role of geolocation services, how you might participate in and benefit from them, and how to make good choices about opting in and opting out of this brave new world.

In the last few weeks, use of web-based services that make use of your current location have become a hot topic. The combination of mobile phones, mobile devices, GPS, location apps, location services and the seemingly-unlimited willingness of people to share information about their current location has opened our eyes to a new stage in the evolution of the web.

The title of the podcast is especially interesting in light of the quote I just saw tonight from Google’ Eric Schmidt: “We can suggest what you should do next, what you care about. Imagine: We know where you are, we know what you like.”

We start with a look at the location-based “check-in” services, starting with Foursquare and the high-profile launch of the new Facebook Places. These services allow people to “check-in” and announce that they are at certain places through social media tools. the idea is that you can potentially identify other “friends” at the same location, find restaurants, et al. Sometimes, there might be “game” aspects where you might get recognition, points or awards for checking-in multiple times at a location.

Tom likes these services and uses them. I’m far more wary of them and am uncomfortable with giving up location information. We take a bit of a point/counterpoint approach to the pros and cons of these services.

We also make some predictions about the way these services might affect lawyers and the practice of law. My take is that there are probably some ways these services will have an impact, possibly significant, in some areas of the practice of law, and there are some interesting opportunities for creative lawyers to use these services in their practices. However, I’ll need smelling salts if lawyers take to these services in a significant way in the next year or two. If you are an innovator, put on your thinking cap and you might find that you can capture some areas long before anyone else gets there.

That is, if you are comfortable with the whole idea of giving up location information to the public. I must admit that I find it interesting to see people freely giving up information about their movements and whereabouts on the Internet when there would be a firestorm if government agencies announced that they wanted to collect the same location data. Geolocation is a trend worth watching simply for what it shows about our evolving sense of privacy.

In our “stuff Tom and Dennis have been talking about” segment, Tom reveals that he has recently purchased an iPad and I take advantage of the time slot to ask some specific questions that will impact on my own buying decision. Tom’s answers will be quite useful for anyone contemplating an iPad purchase.

We end the podcast with our Parting Shots – practical tips you can use right away. Tom solidifies his position as DropBox’s #1 fan, and highlights some new features of this highly-praised online file storage and sharing service from DropBox. I point you to the recently-released 2010 Inside Legal / ILTA legal technology survey and the insights it will give you about trends and developments in legal technology today. Rodney Dowell has a great podcast interview with JoAnna Forshee and Jobst Elster of Inside Legal covering the highlights of the survey.

Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think. Show notes for the podcast are here. And try some of the back episodes as well. You can also now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

Siteless Web Presence – Podcast

Wednesday, August 18th, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “The Siteless Web Presence” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Clio. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – consider trying out an episode or becoming a regular subscriber.

Here’s the episode (#36) description:

The conventional wisdom has long been that your website, or perhaps your blog, should be at the core of your web presence. Today, your Internet presence is likely to consist of LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts, and a variety of other places people can find you. Is this expansion of “presence” changing the common wisdom and bringing us to what’s been called the “Siteless Web”? In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the changing Internet environment, whether a website really matters anymore, and how to manage your multi-faceted presence on the Internet.

My friend Ernie the Attorney used to say sometimes that when he didn’t know what he thought about something, he would write a blog post just to learn what he actually thought.

In this episode, Tom and I took that approach. We knew that we wanted to think about the topic of the “Siteless Web” as a way to get a few thoughts together for the webinar we’re doing tomorrow, but we weren’t sure what those thoughts would be. So, rather than go into the podcast with an agenda, we decided just to talk about the topic and see where it led us.

We hope you like this approach.

The “Siteless Web Presence” refers to the potential movement away from a central website or blog to which you direct your audience and have control over what information they get to decentralized web presence that recognizes, especially in the world of social media, that you may have audiences that don’t go to your website or blog, but get information about you and from you in a variety of ways and ways in which you might not have the same degree of control as a website or blog.

Tom sets out a structural way to think about this based on some of Chris Brogan’s writings, emphasizing the idea of a “home base” and “outposts.”

Not surprisingly, I push the idea a bit further than most would and suggest we consider the idea of a number of “personal portals” that link to a variety of our web presences and recognize that our audiences vary and come to us in differnet ways.

Is it time to move away from websites and blogs? I don’t think quite yet, but it’s important to think about what the future holds. I will say that if I didn’t already have a longstanding website or blog, I might consider going directly to some of the “siteless” approaches.

In our “stuff Tom and Dennis have been talking about” segment, we take on one aspect of the “siteless web” – Facebook presence, and discuss our thinking about whether it makes sense to create a fan page for our podcast and how we would go about doing that. You get to eavesdrop on our thought process and I think that you’ll find this segment helpful if you are considering how to bring your business into Facebook.

We end the podcast with our Parting Shots – practical tips you can use right away. Tom loads up with a trifecta of Google tips – dragging and dropping Gmail attachments, file conversion, and how to see what Google knows about your social circle. I try an parting shot embedded within a parting shot – recommending the Legal Toolbox podcast and an episode called “The Use of SaaS in the Legal Field” as a great introduction for lawyers to cloud computing, and then a tip from the podcast to try to visit an actual data center if you are considering cloud computing options. If you can’t make an in person visit, there are video tours (example) you can find on the Web. I predict it will change the way you think about cloud computing.

Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think. Show notes for the podcast are here. And try some of the back episodes as well. You can also now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

A Podcast Listener’s Guide – Podcast

Monday, August 9th, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “A Podcast Listener’s Guide” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Clio. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – consider trying out an episode or becoming a regular subscriber.

Here’s the episode (#35) description:

Lawyers have started to dabble in listening to and creating podcasts. Most of the emphasis we see is on how to create podcasts. However, listening regularly to podcasts can bring you a treasure trove of timely and practical information, especially if you don’t have time to read everything in your “to read” stack. In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell offer some great tips and techniques for improving your use of podcasts, making the most of your listening time, and generally opening the doors to an underused information resource.

I’ve talked to a number of people recently who listen to the occasional podcast, but don’t really seem to take advantage of greats ways to use podcasts. People tell me that they listen to podcasts they find a direct link to or they visit the website of a podcast to download an episode from time to time. In most cases, they don’t seem to take advantage of the best way to consume podcasts – subscribing to them.

At the same time, I noticed that most of the articles and posts I see about podcasts, especially for lawyers, seem to focus on whether and how to produce your own podcast.

As in most aspects of the Internet these days, you can get benefit from being a producer or a consumer. Too often, people neglect the significant benefits of becoming a smart consumer of content. Hence, the idea for this podcast.

I’ve listened to audio content (books on tape, seminars, CDs, etc.) for many years. I’m definitely an audio learner.

I also noticed several years ago that you could listen to commercial radio on a short car trip and never hear anything other than commercials or DJ promotional chatter for your whole trip. Even National Public Radio, which reduces the “commercials,” still gives you the audio content in the order they want.

As we mention several times in the podcast, the key way to think about podcasts is as “Tivo for radio.” This is especially true since organizations like NPR make so much of their daily content available for free later as podcasts. By subscribing to podcasts, you can listen to programs when you want, where you want and in the ways you want. You might listen on an iPod or on your computer, in your car or office or while working out.

Two key points:

First, the big benefit I see to podcasts is the control it gives you as a listener. You can determine what you listen to when and where. It’s difficult to overestimate the value of portability. If you use iTunes, you also are able to use its control features (organizing into playlists, listening at double speed, et al.).

Second, you really need to take advantage of the ability to subscribe to podcasts, either through iTunes or via an RSS feed. By subscribing, the podcasts automatically come to you and you never have to go out again and look for individual episodes. Your task becomes one of management rather than finding.

We go into all of this in a good amount of detail on the podcast. I think you’ll find it helpful.

As a note, if Tom seems surprised at one point, it’s because he actually was surprised that he had convinced me to change my approach and use the method he uses. I actually am willing to consider good ideas and and make changes based on them.

In our “Questions and Answers” segment, we anticpate our audience question (i.e., “What podcasts do you listen to?”) and provide a list (and mini-reviews) of some of our favorite podcasts these days. You can put together a pretty good list just by taking notes from this section.

We end the podcast with our Parting Shots – practical tips you can use right away. Tom, a huge fan of e-books, recommends Calibre as an e-book management tool. I note a great little Internet Explorer 8 tip our friend Adriana Linares tweeted recently – simply hitting the key will reveal the standard menus (File, Edit, View, etc.) at the top that are missing from the standard view in IE8. It’s a simple tip that can make your life just a little easier.

Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think. Show notes for the podcast are here. And try some of the back episodes as well. You can also now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

Powering Up Your Personal Productivity – Podcast

Monday, August 2nd, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “Powering Up Your Personal Productivity” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Clio. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – consider trying out an episode or becoming a regular subscriber.

Here’s the episode description:

“Do more with less” is a mantra of the day. One of the great promises of the day is that technology will organize and optimize us, as computers take over the work we don’t need to do and make our lives easier. The reality feels more like a jammed email inbox, a mountain of to-do lists and technology we often fight with. In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell and special guest Allison Shields, discuss the importance of improving personal productivity and the role technology, when done well, can play in optimizing your work, enhancing your productivity and simplifying your life.

We haven’t had a guest host for a while and we wanted to talked about personal productivity. When it comes to personal productivity for lawyers, law practice management consultant Allison Shields of LawyerMeltdown.com and the Legal Ease Blog is certainly the first person I think of. She has published many articles, blog posts and podcasts on personal productivity for lawyers. All of them are highly practical and she speaks/writes in ways that lawyers can understand, presenting great information that you can put into immediate use. Tom and I were very pleased that she was able to fit a visit to our podcast into her busy schedule.

There’s a lot of great information and discussion about personal productivity in this podcast. In my opinion, anyone who listens to the podcast will take away at least one great tip that will help make his or her life a little easier than it is today.

We launch in with the basic, troubling question of whether technology designed to make us more productive has actually made us feel less productive and more overwhelmed than ever before. Our answers might surprise you. Then, it’s on to the impact of billing time on productivity, the central role of email management and whether there might be a “magic bullet.” If there’s a magic bullet, I haven’t found it. We also discuss the importance of seeing productivity as a process.

Allison offers a very useful way to think about categories of productivity and the need to assess where you have the biggest needs and what tools best address those needs.

We try to end on a note of hope, even though improving productivity is an ongoing battle for all of us.

In our “Questions and Answers” segment, we ask Allison “What are your best tips for improving personal productivity using technology?” Allison has some great ideas, especially about using calendars, and Tom and I chime in with a few tips of our own.

We end the podcast with our Parting Shots – practical tips you can use right away. Allison notes that effective use of Outlook is a key element in improving productivity and recommends Ben Schorr’s The Lawyer’s Guide to Microsoft Outlook 2007. She also raves about an online scheduler called Tungle. Tom is also a fan of Tungle, and offers the new EverNote Trunk as his parting shot. EverNote Trunk is described as “a showcase of great apps and products that makes your Evernote experience more awesome.” I maintain that David Allen’s works are essential to understanding personal productivity and highly recommend his books, Getting Things Done and Making It All Work, and some GTD blogs and websites, including David’s website (lots of free resources) and the blog GTD Times.

Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think. Show notes for the podcast are here. And try some of the back episodes as well. You can also now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

Lawyers as Project Managers – Podcast

Monday, July 12th, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “Lawyers as Project Managers” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Clio. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – consider trying out an episode or becoming a regular subscriber.

Here’s the episode description:

It’s what you do with the technology after you get it that really matters. A hot area these days in legal technology is the use of technology for project management, especially in e-discovery. But e-discovery is not the only place we’re seeing project management discussions. In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell take a look at the impact project management concerns will play in technology choices, the evolution of legal project management skills and practices, and the increasing role project management is already playing in the practice of law.

It seems that a day rarely goes by where I don’t see several blog posts and articles about the growing role project management is playing in the practice of law.

In a sense, it’s a bit of a surprise to see the emphasis in 2010, because the idea has been around for quite a while. I had written about using a program called The MasterList because of its project management focus back in my 2002 legal tech trends article, an article also noteworthy for my confident prediction about the role blogs could play. Ironically, it was a prediction I confidently made more than a year before I got around to starting my own blog. Tom and I also dedicated a chapter of our book to the role of project management tools in collaboration efforts.

On the other hand, there’s no doubt that the growing emphasis on e-discovery has re-energized and brought a new focus to the role project management can play in the practice of law, and Tom and I dive into this very important topic.

We cover the waterfront, from difference between case manaagement and project management to whether project manage is a necessary lawyer skill today to the huge benefits good project managers bring to projects.

One of the great things I’ve found is that project management skills can definitely be taught and learned. Project management is also a great example of an approach to fit your technology into your real-world needs.

In our “Questions and Answers” segment, we take on two audience questions:

1. Is there a good way to manage or delete Facebook friends with whom I no longer want to be “friends”? (Yes – and we outline a couple of approaches)

2. Is there a way that I can easily go back and look through old tweets, Facebook posts and other social media updates? (yes – there are ways, but probably not so easily as you’d wish)

We end the podcast with our Parting Shots – practical tips you can use right away. Tom thinks it’s time to take a closer look at Google Voice and recommends a blog post on the top 10 clever Google Voice tricks. I rave about Rodney Dowell’s recent episode of The Un-Billable Hour titled “Outsourcing Legal Work to India – Even Solos Do it and Nick Morgan’s recent blog post “10 Rules for Presenting as a Team.

Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think. Show notes for the podcast are here. And try some of the back episodes as well. You can also now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

The Summer of the Smartphone – Podcast

Monday, July 12th, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “The Summer of the Smartphone” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Clio. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – we’re very pleased with the growing numbers of downloads the podcast is getting.

Here’s the episode description:

The demand for pre-orders for the new iPhone 4 knocked out the AT&T order site on the first day. It seems like someone announces a new Android phone every few days. HP recently bought Palm. And the love affair between lawyers and BlackBerries seems to be cooling off . . . maybe. There’s never been a more confusing time to be looking for a smartphone. In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell survey the current smartphone landscape, try to make sense of where we are and where we are going, and offer some guidance, tips and opinions on the ever-changing world of smartphones.

The episode was recorded about three weeks ago and, if anything, it seems like the consensus that we have arrived at the smartphone era is growing faster than we expected. For example, I saw reports recently that Nokia had commented that the demand for smartphones was knocking down sales of traditional cellphones.

We started with John Pazkowski’s recent humorous headline on Digital Daily: “Analysts Raise iPhone 4 Sales Forecasts from Huge to Ginormous.”

Since I have historically struggled with even the rudimentary use of a phone, I’m delighted to find that phones are becoming more like computers.

Tom and I share our thoughts on the iPhone 4, Android phones and other shartphones and give our tips for selecting and purchasing a smartphone. For me, it’s difficult not to consider the carrier as the key factor in your decision.

In our “stuff Dennis and Tom have been talking about lately” segment, we bat around the question whether Tom and I should create an iPhone app for our podcast, book and other projects. Tom remains dubious, but the conversation will help you consider some of the factors that come into play when looking into the iPhone app platform.

A few days after we recorded the episode, I convinced myself that Facebook (fan page or application) was a better route to take than an iPhone app, even though I remain intrigued by the idea of creating an iPhone app.

We end the podcast with our Parting Shots – practical tips you can use right away. Tom recommends Judgepedia, “an interactive encyclopedia of courts and judges.” I recommend a favorite podcast of mine – the BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects.

Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think. Show notes for the podcast are here. And try some of the back episodes as well. You can also now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

Follow my microblog on Twitter – @dkennedyblog. Follow me – @denniskennedy

Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools

Simplifying Legal Technology Strategies – Podcast

Monday, June 14th, 2010

Tom Mighell and I have recorded another episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast and it’s now available on the Legal Talk Network and on iTunes, with an RSS feed here. The episode is called “Simplifying Legal Technology Strategies” (show notes here), and it’s sponsored by Clio. A special thank you to readers of this blog who listen to the podcast – we’re very pleased with the growing numbers of downloads the podcast is getting.

Here’s the episode description:

Law firms tend to struggle with setting technology strategies. They get as far as forming technology committees, yet often give them little or no direction. Are there some simple ways to set your underlying technology strategy and keep your firm on course? In this episode, co-hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss a simple approach to technology strategy based on familiar investment principles, the importance of diversification and an easy visual approach to help make things happen.

This podcast grew out of an article I wrote that appeared in April in the ABA’s Law Practice Today webzine called ““Putting Diversification at the Center of Your Firm’s Technology Strategy – Using a Simple Grid” (download PDF version here).

I’ve always found that law firms have, at best, some kind of vague and amorphous default strategy they use when making technology decisions. This approach does not serve them well. In the article and the podcast, I try to put forth a simple strategy I’ve found helpful that can be put together using one sheet of paper and a simple grid. I draw on analogies from investing, portfolio management and diversification and attmept to apply them to legal technology decision-making. Tom and I talk about the approach in some detail. This approach forces you to think in terms of risk and return (or cost and benefit). If you are trying to come up with some kind of strategy for technology decisions, let me suggest this as a starting point. It synthesizes a lot of the ideas I’ve had about legal technology over the years into one simple package.

We also take on the topic of “social media experts and gurus” in our “stuff Dennis and Tom have been talking about lately” segment. In part, it’s a semi-serious bit of whining about why, even though Tom and I have been using social media forever (i.e., more than 3 years), we never get referred to as “social media gurus.” More so, it’s a discussion of the history of web pioneers and early adopters as compared to the role of the “explainers” and teachers. My contention is that the early movers tend to be focused on “just doing it” and aren’t as able to clearly analyze, categorize and explain what they are doing, which is something that a later round of adopters can often see and set out. With my own blog, I was so concentrated on writing to reach a new audience that I didn’t think much about “best practices” and “rules.” If asked to speak or write an article on blogging, I might do that, but I noticed that others tended to study what bloggers were doing and systematize it. That sometimes resulted in the odd feeling I’d get when reading an article that indicated I was breaking all the “rules” of blogging for lawyers or, worse, that my blog wasn’t technically even a blog. Tom and I have a great conversation and I recommend it to you as a springboard for more discussion on the topic. Just a reminder: we always welcome your questions for future Q&A segments.

We end the podcast with our Parting Shots – practical tips you can use right away. Tom recommends a cool tool called Soluto that can help you speed up the start process when you turn on your computer. I take a moment to honor the passing of John Wooden and then give a great tip I found to help you turn spoken word recordings in iTunes into recordings that can be listened to at double speed.

Give our new episode a listen and let me know what you think. Show notes for the podcast are here. And try some of the back episodes as well. You can also now follow the podcast on Twitter at @tkmreport.

[Originally posted on DennisKennedy.Blog (http://www.denniskennedy.com/blog/)]

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Now Available! The Lawyer’s Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, by Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Visit the companion website for the book at LawyersGuidetoCollaboration.com. Twitter: @collabtools